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Intel & Microsoft hope to push iPad's global market share under 50% in 2013

post #1 of 75
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Both Microsoft and Intel are said to have been working closely with PC makers in hopes of pushing Apple's iPad to less than 50 percent of the global tablet market by mid-2013.

Original design manufacturers based in Taiwan indicated to DigiTimes that Intel and Microsoft have been working closely with partners to develop new tablets based on the forthcoming Windows 8 operating system, which will launch this fall. The sources indicated that Microsoft will release Windows 8 for traditional PCs to device makers in September, while Windows RT, the newly announced name for the ARM-based version, will be issued some time after.

A total of 32 Windows 8 tablets are expected to be available this year. Participating manufacturers Hewlett-Packard, Dell, Lenovo, Acer, Asustek, and Toshiba are expected to launch models by the end of 2012.

Windows 8 tablets from Lenovo and Acer are expected to be priced as low as $300, to take on low-end Android tablets, while more expensive and powerful models will target Apple's iPad. Those tablets will reportedly cost as much as $1,000; Apple's most expensive iPad model with a 64-gigabyte capacity and wireless cellular connectivity is $829.

Intel has been looking to make up for lost ground in the mobile space ever since Apple decided that Intel's Atom processors weren't efficient enough to run the iPad. Instead, Apple developed its own new ARM chip design, which it dubbed A4, that debuted in the first-generation iPad.




Now, most smartphones and tablets run on ARM processors rather than Intel's mobile chips, which continue to dominate in more traditional PCs. Intel, however, hopes to find more success with smartphones and tablets with its new "Medfield" processors, unveiled at the Consumer Electronics Show earlier this year.

Microsoft, meanwhile, plans to hedge its bets between Intel and ARM with the release of Windows 8 later this year. The Redmond, Wash., software giant revealed last year that Windows 8 will offer compatibility with ARM-based processors, which allow longer battery life for portable devices.

Since the iPad launched in 2010, Apple's device has been the dominant player in the touchscreen tablet market. One recent prediction from Gartner called for Apple to account for 61 percent of tablet sales in 2012.

[ View article on AppleInsider ]
post #2 of 75
That'll probably be about as successful as their plan to take down the iPod with the Zune.
post #3 of 75
Yep, like Nokia with MSFT But one day the dreams will come through
post #4 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdjohn3 View Post

That'll probably be about as successful as their plan to take down the iPod with the Zune.

Also about as successful as their ultrabook strategy as well.
post #5 of 75
"Intel & Microsoft hope to push iPad's global market share under 50% in 2013"

Well the only way they can do that is by making a better product, so I hope they do.
post #6 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Both Microsoft and Intel are said to have been working closely with PC makers in hopes of pushing Apple's iPad to less than 50 percent of the global tablet market by mid-2013.

In that case I'll take two.
post #7 of 75
I get why Intel wants it to happen, they don't have any say in the iPad whatsoever. But why are Apple and Microsoft still fighting each other this hard? Google is a much closer threat to both companies than they are to each other. I understand the iPad threatens the Windows dominance (to a point), but if Microsoft would just release a badass version of Office for the iPad, people would probably make it their first App Store purchase when they get a new iPad, even if Microsoft wanted to charge a premium for it.
post #8 of 75
Good luck with that.
post #9 of 75
Ha, ha. It's always good to start the day with a good laugh!
post #10 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post

I get why Intel wants it to happen, they don't have any say in the iPad whatsoever. But why are Apple and Microsoft still fighting each other this hard? Google is a much closer threat to both companies than they are to each other. I understand the iPad threatens the Windows dominance (to a point), but if Microsoft would just release a badass version of Office for the iPad, people would probably make it their first App Store purchase when they get a new iPad, even if Microsoft wanted to charge a premium for it.

I am not sure about Google actually! As Tim Cook said in his phone conference, there is another competitor out there which is not Google (referring to MS).

I think Google would not be the main competitor for at least until they are done with the acquisition of MOTO and refining the software/hardware package. This gives another year to both Apple and MS. Google was initially a threat to MS but MS managed to steer clear and it is now on the safe side. For instance Google docs are great products but they did not punch a hole sadly.
post #11 of 75
[QUOTE=AppleInsider;2097854]Both Microsoft and Intel are said to have been working closely with PC makers in hopes of pushing Apple's iPad to less than 50 percent of the global tablet market by mid-2013.



And in 2013 I will be working with various political parties to become the President of China.
post #12 of 75
Predictions like these, coming from a couple of companies that have sadly not been able to realize any of their recent past predictions just seem pointless.

We could go back in time and hear the exact same argument regarding iPods vs mp3 players. Or iPhone vs any number of single hardware iterations.

The fact that Apple has gotten a foothold into enterprise - well it's not a foothold because they've created and own the iPad category, tells me it's going to be all the other tablet manufacturers on the outside trying to get in. I'm sure they'll chip away at Apple's market share, but then again Apple isn't going to sit still with what they have - hardware or software wise. That's the part that I think these prognosticators forget. They're talking about moving forward as if Apple is going to sit still and we know that just isn't the case.

I'm still waiting to see ANY other company come up with something radically new and different as far as a smartphone or tablet or something entirely new. It's not happening, unless we factor Apple into the mix, which is sad. What happened to companies creating things? It seems like everything we're seeing out there for tech is just a copy of what Apple has created.
post #13 of 75
So they have app and media stores ready to go? They have licensing agreements with all the major studios and other content generators? They have a mature and "developer friendly" development environment (this one they do with Visual Studio)? They have a cloud storage solution ready to go? They have a revenue sharing plan ready for developers (IMHO, they ought to make it an 80-20 split to give developers better return than Apple.)? They have extremely strict hardware spec requirements (screen resolution, storage, GPU performance, connectivity, etc.) to avoid the splintering that has occurred with Android? They have a way to keep OEMs from gumming up the systems with adware?

iOS is so much more than a hunk of hardware and an OS.

IMHO, Microsoft ought to become more like Apple and make their own tablet - hardware, OS, everything. Partner with some manufacturers if you must, but make it a MICROSOFT device. (Although the Zune didn't work out so well for them, but the XBox has.)

- Jasen.
post #14 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post

I get why Intel wants it to happen, they don't have any say in the iPad whatsoever. But why are Apple and Microsoft still fighting each other this hard? Google is a much closer threat to both companies than they are to each other. I understand the iPad threatens the Windows dominance (to a point), but if Microsoft would just release a badass version of Office for the iPad, people would probably make it their first App Store purchase when they get a new iPad, even if Microsoft wanted to charge a premium for it.

Count me one of them.
post #15 of 75
Meanwhile, on the smartphone front, Microsoft chugs along with 2% market share. After years and billions $ of effort

Success in smartphones and tablets are tied together in the long term

Windows survivor - after a long, epic and painful struggle. Very long AAPL

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Windows survivor - after a long, epic and painful struggle. Very long AAPL

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post #16 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

"Intel & Microsoft hope to push iPad's global market share under 50% in 2013"

Well the only way they can do that is by making a better product, so I hope they do.

Yeah that headline.. it sounds like they'll do whatever it takes to defeat their enemy. Give away wintel tablets for free even. What about introducing some great products?
post #17 of 75
If you listen to the anti-Apple/pro-Android posters here you'd think the iPad was also below 50% in the face of the Kindle Fire and Galaxy tablets.


Quote:
Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post

I get why Intel wants it to happen, they don't have any say in the iPad whatsoever. But why are Apple and Microsoft still fighting each other this hard? Google is a much closer threat to both companies than they are to each other. I understand the iPad threatens the Windows dominance (to a point), but if Microsoft would just release a badass version of Office for the iPad, people would probably make it their first App Store purchase when they get a new iPad, even if Microsoft wanted to charge a premium for it.

But then MS is saying they'll take a submissive role as an App Store developer. With Office for Mac they were making plenty of money on it without giving up their Windows dominance, but to go that route does help strengthen a platform that is monopolizing the tablet market while eating away at their PC sales... which also include their Office suite et al. app sales.

At this point they should be fighting to win.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #18 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post

I get why Intel wants it to happen, they don't have any say in the iPad whatsoever. But why are Apple and Microsoft still fighting each other this hard? Google is a much closer threat to both companies than they are to each other. I understand the iPad threatens the Windows dominance (to a point), but if Microsoft would just release a badass version of Office for the iPad, people would probably make it their first App Store purchase when they get a new iPad, even if Microsoft wanted to charge a premium for it.

Don't underestimate Microsoft. They have been hamstrung the last 10 years by antitrust monitoring but that is over now. Meanwhile Tim Cook is demonstrating weakness by letting every pressure group and their dog push Apple around. I expect MS to make a comeback soon.
post #19 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

"Intel & Microsoft hope to push iPad's global market share under 50% in 2013"

Well the only way they can do that is by making a better product, so I hope they do.

I second that. I'm an iPad 2 and 3 owner but I would like to see what Windows 8 brings to the market in the tablet spectrum. Sure there will be poor offerings with some, but I'll give them the benefit of the doubt and hope that they bring some actual competition to Apple. More competition = more innovation/cheaper prices/big win for the consumer.
post #20 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasenj1 View Post

They have a revenue sharing plan ready for developers (IMHO, they ought to make it a 50-50 split to give developers better return than Apple.)?

- Jasen.



Apple's agency model stipulates that developers receive 70% of the revenue produced from their products and services.
post #21 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post



Apple's agency model stipulates that developers receive 70% of the revenue produced from their products and services.

Oops. You're right. Ok, make that 80-20 or 90-10. My bad, I though Apple was keeping 70%.

- Jasen.
post #22 of 75
This will cause the analysts to downgrade Apple in the future...

"Apple just sold 20 million iPads, why did you downgrade AAPL from outperform to neutral?"

"Microsoft and Intel are cutting into Apple's market share."
na na na na na...
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na na na na na...
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post #23 of 75
If Intel were smart, they would strike a deal with Apple to make Apple's processors and other chips that Apple designs in an outsourcing contract, so Intel could generate revenue. Intel is being two faced about this since Intel was late into the ARM processor market. If Apple and Intel joined forces to produce the best ARM processors, then both companies benefit. The problem Microsoft has is their ecosystem is not going to be as developed as Apple since Microsoft doesn't market tablets and computers. Microsoft has already proven that they have a difficult time competing in the iPod and iPhone market, and the tablet market is another that Microsoft just doesn't know how to compete. Microsoft is losing to Apple in the desktop and laptop market because the WIndows based computers just aren't as easy to use, they don't have compelling designs and Apple is just a better overall product that is part of a more developed ecosystem. Customers defect from one brand because they aren't satisfied. It is as simple as that. Customers will only stay with one product until they reach a point where they can't put up with second rate customer service and support. Apple has focused on certain key areas and corporations are learning slowly that the overall price for computer is a sum of the product AND support costs and finding a hardware supplier that can match Apple is impossible to find.
post #24 of 75
Digitimes ... I wish I had their "sources".

If the iPad falls below 50%, it most likely will not have anything to do with Intel.
I'd be looking more at the Windows RT ARM based tablets, and existing Android tablet makers dropping the new Windows OS on them.

I suspect that the market cannibalised wont be the iPad one - it will be the "Android" one.
post #25 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Don't underestimate Microsoft. They have been hamstrung the last 10 years by antitrust monitoring but that is over now. Meanwhile Tim Cook is demonstrating weakness by letting every pressure group and their dog push Apple around. I expect MS to make a comeback soon.

I agree with the first sentence, but the rest is silly.

Antitrust monitoring has not been a major issue for MS in the last decade. The Bush admin didn't care about anti-trust. The biggest issue for MS has been a bad CEO and crappy (Vista) or late (Bing, Zune, WP7) products.

I see no evidence that Cook is "showing weakness." It seems to me that he understands that Apple is no longer viewed as an underdog, which means the level of scrutiny is becoming much higher, and people are less willing to give Apple a pass. He's adapting as needed -- probably better than Jobs would have done.

Here are the real reason not to underestimate MS:

1. Unlike Google, MS knows how to build and sustain a platform.

2. Windows is still very entrenched in corporations. It is really hard to overstate the slavish devotion to MS of some IT groups.

3. MS Office remains a very important, and mostly unchallenged, software suite for business and government. Including MS Office for free on W8 tablets could be their strongest selling point.

Now, having said all that, I think MS will still probably lose to Apple in the tablet space. But it's not an obvious slam dunk for Apple. There is a plausible path to success for MS.
post #26 of 75
Are they planning a mock funeral for the iPad I wonder?

http://www.tgdaily.com/mobility-feat...iphone-funeral

IMHO MS have as much chance of this as RIM do at a come back. They have never innovated in their entire existence, only ripped of other's IP. How on earth can MS come up with a game changer which is what it would take. Their market cap's history tells the story of Ballmer's tenure in a very graphical way ... it's all down hill. The tablet market is a new and different one, their entrenched place in the old PC world is of no help to them in the long run, maybe even a hindrance.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #27 of 75
For the math to work on that (using Gartner's numbers), MSFT would need to gain a 11% share in a year. Not mathematically impossible if the market expands by 50%, but I would imagine they would really only be able to gain at the expense of Android.

There are better interaction models out there than the iPad, I am sure... but I really enjoy using my iPad on the couch to controlling my Apple TV watching Netflix as I catch up on email, news, stocks, and other stuff. In a work setting, there could be a lot of improvement-- to the extent that a slate-styled tablet can have better ergonomics.
post #28 of 75
"Microsoft and Intel try to take over the world"

And the news is?
post #29 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaarrrgggh View Post

For the math to work on that (using Gartner's numbers), MSFT would need to gain a 11% share in a year. Not mathematically impossible if the market expands by 50%, but I would imagine they would really only be able to gain at the expense of Android.

There are better interaction models out there than the iPad, I am sure... but I really enjoy using my iPad on the couch to controlling my Apple TV watching Netflix as I catch up on email, news, stocks, and other stuff. In a work setting, there could be a lot of improvement-- to the extent that a slate-styled tablet can have better ergonomics.

I think the answer to the last part is, not until we see a larger (and proportionately lighter) iPad. There would be a lot better chance of a serious 'work' tablet if it were say 17' or more. I'd refer to this as a desk or work tablet.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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post #30 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdjohn3 View Post

That'll probably be about as successful as their plan to take down the iPod with the Zune.

Yes, and I have plans to overtake Walmart by selling groceries from the back of truck.
post #31 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

Antitrust monitoring has not been a major issue for MS in the last decade. The Bush admin didn't care about anti-trust. The biggest issue for MS has been a bad CEO and crappy (Vista) or late (Bing, Zune, WP7) products.

Yes it has been crappy products, but I think the antitrust is related to that.

At this point in history, with a proliferation of computing devices, integration has proved to be the winning model. But what MS got in trouble for originally was bundling, so every time they had to decide between integration or non- integration over the last 10 years they must have stopped and considered the antitrust implications. Perhaps without that oversight, they would have integrated more, and therefore been more successful than they otherwise have been. Jobs himself said in his biography that it was the antitrust that made Bill get out.

Quote:
I see no evidence that Cook is "showing weakness." It seems to me that he understands that Apple is no longer viewed as an underdog, which means the level of scrutiny is becoming much higher, and people are less willing to give Apple a pass. He's adapting as needed -- probably better than Jobs would have done.

Steve was smart and wanted to change the world but he was also tough. He said about Android that he wanted to "destroy" it, and "go thermonuclear war on this." Now, in business, it must be a scary thing to hear that a genius with $40,000,000,000 dollars wants to destroy you! And more importantly it makes the next guy who might want to come after you think twice. Tim is being too laid back and nice.

Quote:
Here are the real reason not to underestimate MS:

Those are some *additional* reasons.
post #32 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Don't underestimate Microsoft. They have been hamstrung the last 10 years by antitrust monitoring but that is over now. Meanwhile Tim Cook is demonstrating weakness by letting every pressure group and their dog push Apple around. I expect MS to make a comeback soon.

Yes, they have been hamstrung. But no, not by antitrust monitoring. They have been hamstrung by a CEO who isn't up to the job.
post #33 of 75
They're going to target the iPad with $1000+ Win 8 tablets? Can't wait for the fire sale.
post #34 of 75
Apple doesn't care about market share.
post #35 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraboy View Post

Yes, they have been hamstrung. But no, not by antitrust monitoring. They have been hamstrung by a CEO who isn't up to the job.

And why did the previous CEO quit? Jobs (who had long conversations will Bill and has known him for years) said it was the antitrust.
post #36 of 75
i have been using windows 8 on my iPad via Splashtop for a few days now and i can say this;
If the hardware that comes out is affordable while running Windows 8 at decent speeds, Apple will absolutely have something to worry about.
Metro in Win 8 for a tablet is very user friendly and quite decent. If apps follow and the Microsoft Store gets some big developers over there, these predictions might be accurate.
post #37 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Both Microsoft and Intel are said to have been working closely with PC makers in hopes of pushing Apple's iPad to less than 50 percent of the global tablet market by mid-2013.

Original design manufacturers based in Taiwan indicated to DigiTimes that Intel and Microsoft have been working closely with partners to develop new tablets based on the forthcoming Windows 8 operating system, which will launch this fall. The sources indicated that Microsoft will release Windows 8 for traditional PCs to device makers in September, while Windows RT, the newly announced name for the ARM-based version, will be issued some time after.

A total of 32 Windows 8 tablets are expected to be available this year. Participating manufacturers Hewlett-Packard, Dell, Lenovo, Acer, Asustek, and Toshiba are expected to launch models by the end of 2012.

Windows 8 tablets from Lenovo and Acer are expected to be priced as low as $300, to take on low-end Android tablets, while more expensive and powerful models will target Apple's iPad. Those tablets will reportedly cost as much as $1,000; Apple's most expensive iPad model with a 64-gigabyte capacity and wireless cellular connectivity is $829.

Intel has been looking to make up for lost ground in the mobile space ever since Apple decided that Intel's Atom processors weren't efficient enough to run the iPad. Instead, Apple developed its own new ARM chip design, which it dubbed A4, that debuted in the first-generation iPad.




Now, most smartphones and tablets run on ARM processors rather than Intel's mobile chips, which continue to dominate in more traditional PCs. Intel, however, hopes to find more success with smartphones and tablets with its new "Medfield" processors, unveiled at the Consumer Electronics Show earlier this year.

Microsoft, meanwhile, plans to hedge its bets between Intel and ARM with the release of Windows 8 later this year. The Redmond, Wash., software giant revealed last year that Windows 8 will offer compatibility with ARM-based processors, which allow longer battery life for portable devices.

Since the iPad launched in 2010, Apple's device has been the dominant player in the touchscreen tablet market. One recent prediction from Gartner called for Apple to account for 61 percent of tablet sales in 2012.

[ View article on AppleInsider ]

STOP __ STOP The presses

There has been an error 2012-2013 is incorrect. It should have read 3012-3013

Sorry about that
post #38 of 75
Dah, it will happen soon. Apple simply does not have a product to compete in 5.5"-8" tablet space. iPad is great tablet for couch potatoes, but there is a huge demand for smaller tablets which could be held by one hand and for multipurpose tablets.

There will be more tablets of dual tablet/phone usage with headset and speakerphone. Windows 8 tablet can also serve as productivity tool: you can run full blown desktop apps on it.

The industry is changing quickly and Apple is too big it too cocky to react quickly. What happened with iPhone market share is a good example.

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post #39 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

And why did the previous CEO quit? Jobs (who had long conversations will Bill and has known him for years) said it was the antitrust.

Jobs also said he was infertile.
post #40 of 75
Apple should feel extremely smug about this story. Two extremely large corporations working closely with some of the world's leading OEMs to try (I emphasise try as well) and reduce the market share of a single product line from one company! BRING IT ON!
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