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Google Drive launches with 5GB of free cloud storage

post #1 of 34
Thread Starter 
The long-rumored Google Drive service was officially launched on Tuesday, offering users 5 gigabytes of free cloud-based file storage.

In a post to the company's official blog, Google Drive was presented as a service that allows users to "create, share, collaborate, and keep all of your stuff." It allows users to upload and access all file types, including videos, photos, Google Docs, PDFs and more.

The Google Drive application can also be installed on a Mac or Windows PC to sync files locally. A Drive application is now available for Google Android devices, while the company said it is "working hard" on a version of Drive for iOS devices.

For those who need more storage, Google offers 20 gigabytes for $5 per year, 80 gigabytes for $20, 200 gigabytes for $50, 400 gigabytes for $100, and one terabyte for $256.

Upgrading to a paid account will also give Gmail users a boost on their e-mail storage through Google to 25 gigabytes. Storage used in Gmail does not come out of space allotted for Google Drive.



In comparison, Apple's iCloud service, which launched last October, comes with 5 gigabytes for free, while users can buy an additional 10 gigabytes for $20 per year, 20 gigabytes for $40, or 50 gigabytes for $100.

Google said that Drive allows users to work with others in real time on documents, spreadsheets and presentations. Using the new service, users can also share content easily, and add and reply to comments on anything, including PDFs, images, or video files.

Of course, the company's search technology is also a part of the package, granting the ability to search by keyword and filter by type, owner and more. Google Drive can also recognize text in scanned documents using Optical Character Recognition technology.

Drive also ties in with other Google products, allowing users to attach photos from Drive to posts in the Google+ social networking service. Soon, users will also be able to attach files from Drive directly to e-mails in Gmail.

Google also boasted that drive is an "open platform," which will allow third-party developers to enable new features. Some of the additions mentioned by the company include the ability to send faxes, edit videos, and create website mockups.
post #2 of 34

Here, place all your stuff here for us to rifle through... uh, I mean, to index and make accessible to you.  Heck we will even do OCR on your images so we can scrape every last bit of data from your files. All for you of course...

 

Google, your service is interesting, I just wish I trusted you more...

NoahJ
"It is unwise to be too sure of one's own wisdom. It is healthy to be reminded that the strongest might weaken and the wisest might err." - Mahatma Gandhi
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NoahJ
"It is unwise to be too sure of one's own wisdom. It is healthy to be reminded that the strongest might weaken and the wisest might err." - Mahatma Gandhi
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post #3 of 34

For the paid options that's dramatically less expensive than Drop Box.
 

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post #4 of 34

Since Apple is incurably bad at anything server side, this might be worth a look. And before anyone accuses me of trolling, my iCloud email has been playing up for weeks, and a movie I rented off iTunes yesterday took 7 hours to download.

post #5 of 34

iCloud email has indeed has some early outages—but that feature is more competing with GMail, not Google Drive.

 

I prefer Apple to hold my data because keeping my data private is central to how they make money (i.e., giving thei customer a good product and a good experience).

 

Whereas for Google, privacy is a necessary “evil” that works against how they make nearly all of their money (selling info about you to advertisers, directly or otherwise).

 

Google’s profits are harmed by privacy. Apple’s profits are helped by it. I don’t question Google’s technical prowess, but I question whether they can be trusted today, next year, and in 5 years, to care about my privacy as much as I do.

 

Plus I hate ads. I’m happy to let my phone company pay a subsidy to Apple for my iCloud privileges :)

post #6 of 34

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NoahJ View Post

 

Google, your service is interesting, I just wish I trusted you more...

 

 

I agree.  When Gmail first came out, a friend of mine was very into it.  I told him that I wasn't comfortable with any third party using my email as a database.

 

I don't trust any of these companies offereing cloud services.  With hard drives being as cheap as they are, I see little or no reason for third-party storage, unless the intent is to keep redundant copies off-site in an encrypted format, in case your house burns down or something.  Otherwise, I llike to keep my data safe at home.

post #7 of 34

Don't trust us? How about we charge you to go through your files if you want to upload more? Trust us now?

 

No thanks, I'll let Spotlight index locally.

post #8 of 34

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

For those who need more storage, Google offers 20 gigabytes for $5 per year, 80 gigabytes for $20, 200 gigabytes for $50, 400 gigabytes for $100, and one terabyte for $256.

 

According to Google's official blog announcement, 25GB costs $30/year, 100GB is $60/year and 1TB is $600/year.  I'm not sure where your numbers come from.

 

EDIT:  As someone pointed out below, AI had the old prices, which were much better.

 


Edited by NormM - 4/27/12 at 5:02am
post #9 of 34

Seriously?  As if I'd really give Google access to my filesystem?  So they can, what?, index it to sell targeted ads about my content to third parties?

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

    AT&T believes their LTE coverage is adequate

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   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

    AT&T believes their LTE coverage is adequate

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post #10 of 34

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Seriously?  As if I'd really give Google access to my filesystem?  So they can, what?, index it to sell targeted ads about my content to third parties?

 

You like viagra and birth control pills ads?

post #11 of 34

The storage pricing is interesting. Right now, if you click to upgrade your storage, you're presented with the traditional options of 20GB for $5 and so on, not the ones Google specifies in their blog post. Since I already purchased the 20GB/$5 option a couple months ago, my Google Drive has 25GB of storage right now for a measly $5/year.

 

I wonder if/when they'll change this. As of now, that is incredibly cheap for a ton of cloud storage. I'd recommend anyone considering using Google Drive to get the upgrade now instead of waiting.

post #12 of 34

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Planet Blue View Post

The storage pricing is interesting. Right now, if you click to upgrade your storage, you're presented with the traditional options of 20GB for $5 and so on, not the ones Google specifies in their blog post. Since I already purchased the 20GB/$5 option a couple months ago, my Google Drive has 25GB of storage right now for a measly $5/year.

 

I wonder if/when they'll change this. As of now, that is incredibly cheap for a ton of cloud storage. I'd recommend anyone considering using Google Drive to get the upgrade now instead of waiting.

 

https://support.google.com/drive/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=2374993&topic=14940&ctx=topic

 

 

Storage Monthly Rate
25 GB $2.49
100 GB $4.99
200 GB $9.99
400 GB $19.99
1 TB $49.99
2 TB $99.99
4 TB $199.99
8 TB $399.99
16 TB $799.99
 

 

Obviously AppleInsider did not research the real costs of Google Drive storage. They offer monthly fees beyond the initial free 5 GB.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #13 of 34

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Seriously?  As if I'd really give Google access to my filesystem?  So they can, what?, index it to sell targeted ads about my content to third parties?

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Just_Me View Post

 

 

You like viagra and birth control pills ads?

 


I know, right?!   First, if you don't want ads, get an ad blocker.  I haven't seen ads on the internet in *years*.

 

And if you're too lazy to get a free ad blocker, then would you rather that the ads you see be something you might actually be interested in?  Or just lots of dancing clowns advertising low low refinance rates?  (Do they still do dancing clowns?  *I don't know myself, because I use an ad blocker!*)

 

... oh, and AI:  I give it a "fail" on the new interface.  And what's with the major FB promotion - the "click here for FB" button was about 10 times larger than the "login" button!  Uck.

post #14 of 34

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierrajeff View Post

 

 

 

 

 


I know, right?!   First, if you don't want ads, get an ad blocker.  I haven't seen ads on the internet in *years*.

 

And if you're too lazy to get a free ad blocker, then would you rather that the ads you see be something you might actually be interested in?  Or just lots of dancing clowns advertising low low refinance rates?  (Do they still do dancing clowns?  *I don't know myself, because I use an ad blocker!*)

 

... oh, and AI:  I give it a "fail" on the new interface.  And what's with the major FB promotion - the "click here for FB" button was about 10 times larger than the "login" button!  Uck.

 

AI wants to track you using FB.....but hey look pretty website.


Edited by Just_Me - 4/24/12 at 12:47pm
post #15 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierrajeff View Post
And what's with the major FB promotion - the "click here for FB" button was about 10 times larger than the "login" button!  Uck.

 

Screen Shot 2012-04-24 at 3.55.35 PM.png

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #16 of 34

Where the f*** did you get that impression from what I wrote? 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierrajeff View Post


I know, right?!   First, if you don't want ads, get an ad blocker.  I haven't seen ads on the internet in *years*.

 

And if you're too lazy to get a free ad blocker, then would you rather that the ads you see be something you might actually be interested in?  Or just lots of dancing clowns advertising low low refinance rates?  (Do they still do dancing clowns?  *I don't know myself, because I use an ad blocker!*)

 

 

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

    AT&T believes their LTE coverage is adequate

Reply

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

    AT&T believes their LTE coverage is adequate

Reply
post #17 of 34

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View PostI prefer Apple to hold my data because keeping my data private is central to how they make money (i.e., giving thei customer a good product and a good experience).

 

Whereas for Google, privacy is a necessary “evil” that works against how they make nearly all of their money (selling info about you to advertisers, directly or otherwise).

 

Google’s profits are harmed by privacy. Apple’s profits are helped by it. I don’t question Google’s technical prowess, but I question whether they can be trusted today, next year, and in 5 years, to care about my privacy as much as I do.

 

Plus I hate ads. I’m happy to let my phone company pay a subsidy to Apple for my iCloud privileges :)

 

You should spend a few minutes with Apple's Privacy Policy. Apple's clearly states they may share "non-personally identifiable" data with whoever they wish and for any reason. An example of that supposed anonymous data that may be shared for marketing/advertising purposes is information associated with a UDID. I suspect many here would not consider that non-personally identifiable.

 

Tim Cook went even further recently. In a March 8th letter to Congress responding to privacy concerns and questions they had ordered Mr Cook to answer:

"We do not share personally identifiable information with 3rd parties for their marketing purposes, absent consent" How does an Apple user give consent for targeted marketing by 3rd parties using personally identifiable information gathered and sold/shared by Apple from your use of their services? 
 
Things are not always as they seem. 
melior diabolus quem scies
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post #18 of 34

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

... the ability to send faxes...

 

That is sooo 1982

 

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/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
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How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
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post #19 of 34

If Dropbox doesn't get their extra storage prices in line with what Google is charging, I'll be switching if this proves to be fast and demonstrates reliable uptime. Anything I store in an offsite cloud goes into an encrypted folder anyway so I'm not worried about Google data mining my files.

 

Now if the 1Password folks start supporting Google Drive, life will be good.

 

BTW, has anyone activated it yet? When I went through the process (https://drive.google.com/start), I got a pop-up informing me that I'd get an e-mail when Google Drive had been activated on the account. So then I tried signing up a new Google account and was offered the opportunity to activate Google Drive immediately (on that account).

post #20 of 34

 

I've used my iDisk pretty much daily since January 2000 when its first version premiered. Seeing that icon pop up on my desktop has always delighted me. I use it a lot for personal backups and storage and file sharing, and a lot for my freelance work as well. Even though I'm making other arrangements for my important data that's backed up up there, I know I'll still be using my iDisk until the day they turn it off this summer.
 
I hope Apple opens up some sort of iCloud-related replacement for it (apart from the in the cloud options that some iCloud-aware apps already have).
post #21 of 34
My DropBox account now has 12.8GB of storage absolutely FREE. Thanks to a beta programme they are running. I find iCloud to be absolutely useless compared to Google Apps and DropBox and I don't have to install Lion to make it work either.
post #22 of 34

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

 

 

You should spend a few minutes with Apple's Privacy Policy. Apple's clearly states they may share "non-personally identifiable" data with whoever they wish and for any reason. An example of that supposed anonymous data that may be shared for marketing/advertising purposes is information associated with a UDID. I suspect many here would not consider that non-personally identifiable.

 

Tim Cook went even further recently. In a March 8th letter to Congress responding to privacy concerns and questions they had ordered Mr Cook to answer:

"We do not share personally identifiable information with 3rd parties for their marketing purposes, absent consent" How does an Apple user give consent for targeted marketing by 3rd parties using personally identifiable information gathered and sold/shared by Apple from your use of their services? 
 
Things are not always as they seem. 

 


Especially not when we read one of GG's posts. So, his implication is that Apple is violating your privacy just as much as Google is. Does anyone believe that? No, I didn't think so, and it's with good reason that no one does.

 

But, let's, for the sake of argument, assume that Apple is an egregious privacy violator like we know Google to be. Does that somehow make it ok that Google is an egregious privacy violator. No, it doesn't.

 

If you value privacy -- and, if you value freedom, you must -- Google remains your worst choice for any "cloud" activity. Would it be wiser not to use cloud storage at all? Probably. But, if you have to or want to, Google simply isn't a good choice.

post #23 of 34

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

 

 

https://support.google.com/drive/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=2374993&topic=14940&ctx=topic

 

 

Storage Monthly Rate
25 GB $2.49
100 GB $4.99
200 GB $9.99
400 GB $19.99
1 TB $49.99
2 TB $99.99
4 TB $199.99
8 TB $399.99
16 TB $799.99
 

 

Obviously AppleInsider did not research the real costs of Google Drive storage. They offer monthly fees beyond the initial free 5 GB.

 

When AI published the article, Google still had the old pricing on their website. They've since updated the page. Google does note, however, that those on the (awesomely cheap) old plan will stay on it indefinitely, as long as they keep renewing:

 

 

Quote:
Google storage plans have changed, but you can stay on your current plan as long as you:
  • Keep your account active
  • Keep payment information in Google Wallet accurate and up-to-date
  • Don’t cancel or upgrade your current plan

 

http://support.google.com/drive/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=39567&p=butter_old_storage

post #24 of 34

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Seriously?  As if I'd really give Google access to my filesystem?  So they can, what?, index it to sell targeted ads about my content to third parties?

 

Yup:

 

Google Drive files can end up in ads, even though you still own them (arstechnica.com)

 

"If a user uploads a photo and sets it as publicly viewable, that picture could end up in an ad for Google."

 

 

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

    AT&T believes their LTE coverage is adequate

Reply

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

    AT&T believes their LTE coverage is adequate

Reply
post #25 of 34

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

For the paid options that's dramatically less expensive than Drop Box.
 

 

It still looks like SkyDrive is a better deal.

post #26 of 34

Not so according to Google. The agreement is basically a boilerplate one, similar to Microsoft's cloud agreement for instance. What's yours remains yours. Google just did a poor job of explaining what the agreement means and why it's required.

 

http://enews.earthlink.net/article/top?guid=20120426/db478476-36b2-4699-824d-76f65fd8ee48

 

EDIT: The Verge has a very good comparison of the terms of service between SkyDrive, iCloud, Dropbox and Google Drive. A good read if you're not familiar with what you agreed to for the service you've chosen to use.

http://www.theverge.com/2012/4/25/2973849/google-drive-terms-privacy-data-skydrive-dropbox-icloud


Edited by Gatorguy - 4/26/12 at 11:21am
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post #27 of 34

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Not so according to Google. The agreement is basically a boilerplate one, similar to Microsoft's cloud agreement for instance. What's yours remains yours. Google just did a poor job of explaining what the agreement means and why it's required.

 

http://enews.earthlink.net/article/top?guid=20120426/db478476-36b2-4699-824d-76f65fd8ee48

 

EDIT: The Verge has a very good comparison of the terms of service between SkyDrive, iCloud, Dropbox and Google Drive. A good read if you're not familiar with what you agreed to for the service you've chosen to use.

http://www.theverge.com/2012/4/25/2973849/google-drive-terms-privacy-data-skydrive-dropbox-icloud

 

My understanding is that Google needed to add all the legalise to allow them to perform minor tasks such as moving data from one server to another and that it is not their intention to rifle through all of your info. 

 

BTW anyone with a skydrive account- MS are downsizing the limits, if you have an existing account you can opt in to keep the 25gb, not sure how long the offer lasts for though...

post #28 of 34

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

 


his implication is that Apple is violating your privacy just as much as Google is. Does anyone believe that?

 

You bet your ass "Apple is violating your privacy just as much as Google is"! And even more than Google if they can get away with it!

And all of those big digital corporations share your 'private' data with the acronyms on a permanent basis. You're in the US, you know! Big Brother is all over you!

 

You're really very naive if you think Apple is holier than thou.

post #29 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlvarezLuis View Post
You bet your ass "Apple is violating your privacy just as much as Google is"! And even more than Google if they can get away with it!

 

In what way?

 

Quote:

And all of those big digital corporations share your 'private' data with the acronyms on a permanent basis.


Well, as the government can force them to, there's no real surprise here. The government has no right to data without legal justification, however.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #30 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

In what way?


 

In every way.

 

Quote:
Well, as the government can force them to, there's no real surprise here.

The 'surprise' here is that the government doesn't need to force them to. The big corporations bend over backwards to accommodate the acronyms' appetite for our personal data, even before they are asked. Betraying their customers trust. No subpoenas or other inconvenient, traceable paperwork necessary.

post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlvarezLuis View Post
In every way.


Yeah, thanks for expounding. I understand perfectly now.

 

… 

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #32 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by hungover View Post

 

 

My understanding is that Google needed to add all the legalise to allow them to perform minor tasks such as moving data from one server to another and that it is not their intention to rifle through all of your info. 

 

BTW anyone with a skydrive account- MS are downsizing the limits, if you have an existing account you can opt in to keep the 25gb, not sure how long the offer lasts for though...

Oh my gosh thankyou for telling me. I signed up for Skydrive pretty much the same day it was released and i had 25GB but today after reading your post I checked it and they shrunk it to 7 GB. There was a button saying if i still wanted the 25GB I had to click now. Sneaky little bastards, I wonder how many original users won'tknow they had to do that to retain their original 25GB before the deadline. It's great, I now have 25GB from Skydrive, 50GB from Box, 10GB from Dropbox, a measly 5GB from Apple and Google and unlimited storage from Asus till Nov. 2014 all for free. I defiantly recommend a Skydrive account for those who don't have one, the online version of Office is great, especially for those who need toshare their docs.

When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #33 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

Oh my gosh thankyou for telling me. I signed up for Skydrive pretty much the same day it was released and i had 25GB but today after reading your post I checked it and they shrunk it to 7 GB. There was a button saying if i still wanted the 25GB I had to click now. Sneaky little bastards, I wonder how many original users won'tknow they had to do that to retain their original 25GB before the deadline. It's great, I now have 25GB from Skydrive, 50GB from Box, 10GB from Dropbox, a measly 5GB from Apple and Google and unlimited storage from Asus till Nov. 2014 all for free. I defiantly recommend a Skydrive account for those who don't have one, the online version of Office is great, especially for those who need toshare their docs.

 

Your collection is still incomplete. You ought to add SugarSync (5GB free) and Minus (10GB free).

 

But... what on earth are you going to do with all those small personal clouds?

 

I started out with DropBox, but 2.5GB was too small/little so I changed to Minus where I have 20GB of free online storage space now. For me that's more than enough for a virtual pendrive/USB stick that I can't lose, forget or have stolen.

post #34 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlvarezLuis View Post

 

Your collection is still incomplete. You ought to add SugarSync (5GB free) and Minus (10GB free).

 

But... what on earth are you going to do with all those small personal clouds?

 

I started out with DropBox, but 2.5GB was too small/little so I changed to Minus where I have 20GB of free online storage space now. For me that's more than enough for a virtual pendrive/USB stick that I can't lose, forget or have stolen.

 

I write a lot of programs, add code to open source projects and I need a place to share them, I mostly use them to store backup/ghost iso's for my computers. Also pictures, music, movies the normal stuff. It adds up pretty quick. The best service I signed up for was Asus Webstorage, I got one year free unlimited storage when I bought my Asus Slider, I knew they weren't going to offer unlimited storage forever so I signed a 5 year contract for only 50 bucks a year. So I paid 200 dollars for unlimited storage for 5 years, not bad if I do say so myself. Plus their service is amazing, if you upload movies in Divx or MP4 you can stream them online in Flash. It converts them on the fly. So cool....


Edited by Relic - 5/7/12 at 4:44pm
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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