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80% of Good Technology enterprise activations are Apple's iPhone, iPad

post #1 of 23
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The top six most-activated devices in the workplace tracked by Good Technology were all Apple devices, with the iPhone and iPad accounting for 79.9 percent of customer activations.

The iPhone 4S was by far the most popular device activated by Good's customers in the first quarter of 2012, accounting for 37 percent of all activations. That built on the record 31 percent of activations Apple's latest-generation smartphone took in the fourth quarter of 2011.

In second place was the iPad 2, which accounted for 17.7 percent of enterprise activations tracked by Good. Close behind in the first quarter was the iPhone 4, which represented 15.2 percent of activations.

Apple's new iPad, released only weeks before the March quarter ended, had a strong initial showing in fourth place. The third-generation tablet represented 12.1 percent of activations in the month of March, and 4.3 percent across the whole quarter.

The first-generation iPad came in fifth place with 2.8 percent of activations in the quarter, while 2.5 percent of Good customers also continued to add Apple's iPhone 3GS, first released in 2009, to their lineup.

Good


The most popular Android device tracked by Good was the Motorola Droid, which came in seventh place with 1.6 percent of activations. It was followed by the Samsung Galaxy S II in eighth, the Google Nexus in ninth, and in tenth was the Sprint EVO 4G smartphone.

No Android-based tablets cracked the top 10 devices, and Good Technology found that 97.3 percent of tablet activations in the first quarter of 2012 were of Apple's iPad.

The iPad was activated the most in three industries: financial services, business and professional services, and life sciences. The mobile device management company revealed that the life sciences category showed "disproportionally higher rates of iPad activations when compared to other overall device activations."

For companies that support both iOS and Android smartphones, Apple remains the dominant choice at 78 percent among Good Technology customers, compared to 28 percent for Android.

The latest numbers show Apple in an even stronger position than Good's last report issued in January. That data, covering the fourth quarter of 2012, found that the iPad represented 96 percent of enterprise tablet activations, while the iPhone was 53 percent of phones.
post #2 of 23

That just cracks me up.  The 3gs which is "old" by today's standards still ranks higher than all non-iOS devices.  Android fanboys really should be ashamed of themselves for defending such a crappy product.

post #3 of 23

next android version should be renamed race for the bottom

post #4 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

That just cracks me up.  The 3gs which is "old" by today's standards still ranks higher than all non-iOS devices.  Android fanboys really should be ashamed of themselves for defending such a crappy product.

 

Not really that bad. Good Technology is all about enterprise and Android is not in that niche. Tons of Android phones are sold to young people, bargain hunters and techno geeks, however due to the open software model they are viewed by enterprise as a potential security risk, regardless of whether that view is justified or not.

 

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post #5 of 23

Stomp.  Stomp.  Stomp.  Stomp.

 

This is becoming embarrassing.

post #6 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

 

 

Not really that bad. Good Technology is all about enterprise and Android is not in that niche. Tons of Android phones are sold to young people, bargain hunters and techno geeks, however due to the open software model they are viewed by enterprise as a potential security risk, regardless of whether that view is justified or not.

 

smoking.gif

 

Security is only part of the picture.  IT departments also want "easy to manage/support".  That's where Apple's model shines over Google's.

 

On the Android side of things, too many cooks means too many people passing the buck (or dropping the ball) when things go wrong.  With Apple, it's a one-stop shop no matter what the problem.

 
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post #7 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by auxio View Post

 

 

Security is only part of the picture.  IT departments also want "easy to manage/support".  That's where Apple's model shines over Google's.

 

On the Android side of things, too many cooks means too many people passing the buck (or dropping the ball) when things go wrong.  With Apple, it's a one-stop shop no matter what the problem.

 

I really hate to say this, but that is usually not an IT department Mantra - otherwise how do they justify Windows. IT departments are usually about job creating and job security and if anyone could do then it would cause them to loose a job, thus the reason not having Mac on the network, they do not need IT support.

post #8 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

 

 

I really hate to say this, but that is usually not an IT department Mantra - otherwise how do they justify Windows. IT departments are usually about job creating and job security and if anyone could do then it would cause them to loose a job, thus the reason not having Mac on the network, they do not need IT support.

 

Maybe, but, I'd be surprised if the IT staff actually thinks things through that far to realize that Macs require less support. IT geeks are a little afraid of them because don't understand them. It's like "How's this thing supposed to work? There is no Start Button."

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post #9 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

 

 

I really hate to say this, but that is usually not an IT department Mantra - otherwise how do they justify Windows. IT departments are usually about job creating and job security and if anyone could do then it would cause them to loose a job, thus the reason not having Mac on the network, they do not need IT support.

 

Then why would an IT company, Good technogoly, ever publish an article that would but them out of business or lessen their amount of business lol.gif

post #10 of 23
It is actually kind of sad that there is no real competition to at least excite the people at Apple to motivate them to even higher accomplishments. Even though AT&T doesn't make much of an attempt to sell the iPhone anymore it still dominates android, even though they are giving those away. And what happened to Lumia? Did that go the way of the Kin?
post #11 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

 

 

I really hate to say this, but that is usually not an IT department Mantra - otherwise how do they justify Windows. IT departments are usually about job creating and job security and if anyone could do then it would cause them to loose a job, thus the reason not having Mac on the network, they do not need IT support.

 

Are you seriously that naive to think that Macs don't require IT support when placed on a Microsoft-centric network?  Here's a couple of examples which would require IT support for the average Mac user in my workplace:

 

1) Someone who has only ever used Windows sends out an email with a link to get a file off the M: drive.

2) You need to fill out a company form/timesheet on an intranet website which only works in Internet Explorer.

 

My point was definitely limited to iPhone/iPad vs Android.  Not Mac vs Windows PC.

 

 
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post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

. Good Technology is all about enterprise and Android is not in that niche.

Not that I have seen. Most people got the app without fully understanding what it does.

Would love for Apple to buy them and better integrate in, specifically so it worked better in an enterprise environment. Using sftp to access our samba server is a pain and of limited flexibility.

(does anybody use WebDAV in a corporate environment?)

BTW, the new forum was bad on an iPad, but barely useable on an iPhone! What was AI thinking?
post #13 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by auxio View Post

 

 

Are you seriously that naive to think that Macs don't require IT support when placed on a Microsoft-centric network?  Here's a couple of examples which would require IT support for the average Mac user in my workplace:

 

1) Someone who has only ever used Windows sends out an email with a link to get a file off the M: drive.

2) You need to fill out a company form/timesheet on an intranet website which only works in Internet Explorer.

 

My point was definitely limited to iPhone/iPad vs Android.  Not Mac vs Windows PC.

 

Actually, I work a number of company who were primarily PC and use my only my Mac Laptop on the company network and did my work and never once had I had a need to call IT for support. The best part when a discussion came up about whether the company should allow more Macs on the company Network IT fought it and justified it as it would required too much support. My Bose at the time turned to me and a few others who also used their own Mac and asked how many time we call IT for support and we all said zero. At the time I and others used VPC and DAVE to do those things which were PC only. Grant it, this pre-dates OSX, OSX made it even simpler. Those company networks were not purely base off of Microsoft, most the network was Unix based since we also had Unix base machines as well.

 

However, my experience and I lots of it form a number of companies is IT department tend not look for simple solutions, the more complicated the better, many times they tell you it is for security reason.

 

 

 

post #14 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

 

 

I really hate to say this, but that is usually not an IT department Mantra - otherwise how do they justify Windows. IT departments are usually about job creating and job security and if anyone could do then it would cause them to loose a job, thus the reason not having Mac on the network, they do not need IT support.

 

Over the years, IT folks have become more knowledgable about Apple, so there is less bias. Then IT folks are up to their eyeballs trying to maintain Windows XP and perhaps Windows 7 machines, and networks, and virus updates, and a myriad of other enterprise based systems; the last thing they need is more to maintain. IT support staff are in no danger of losing their jobs, because Windows is not going away. Apple products and their self-management are what the IT support staff needs to give their customers the functionality they need without incurring heavy support costs.

post #15 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

 

Actually, I work a number of company who were primarily PC and use my only my Mac Laptop on the company network and did my work and never once had I had a need to call IT for support.

 

 

 

 

Yes, but I'd say your perspective is a bit skewed because you work in IT.  Honestly, tell me how many average Mac users would know to find the true network path for the M: drive (or whatever Windows network drives/shares are set up at a Microsoft shop)?

 

Sure the IT department could set up scripts which automatically mount those shares for them on login.  But again, other people who only use Windows will be using drive letters to tell people where to get things on the network, and drive letters have no meaning in Mac OS X.

 

I have plenty of other examples I've lived through over the years, but this is one which comes up frequently.

 

 
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post #16 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

 

 

Not really that bad. Good Technology is all about enterprise and Android is not in that niche. Tons of Android phones are sold to young people, bargain hunters and techno geeks, however due to the open software model they are viewed by enterprise as a potential security risk, regardless of whether that view is justified or not.

 

smoking.gif

 

I see. So Apple products are not suitable for the Enterprise unless there's a chance to use Enterprise success as a reason to justify Android's lousy performance. 

Gotcha.

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post #17 of 23

 

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Originally Posted by sunspot42 View Post

Stomp.  Stomp.  Stomp.  Stomp.

 

This is becoming embarrassing.

 

Especially for a completely missing RIM.

post #18 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by auxio View Post

 

 

Are you seriously that naive to think that Macs don't require IT support when placed on a Microsoft-centric network?  Here's a couple of examples which would require IT support for the average Mac user in my workplace:

 

1) Someone who has only ever used Windows sends out an email with a link to get a file off the M: drive.

2) You need to fill out a company form/timesheet on an intranet website which only works in Internet Explorer.

 

 

 

Thank God Internet Explorer 6 and its quirky rendering ways is finally no longer supported by Microsoft and gone from most of the civilized world. 

post #19 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

 

 

I really hate to say this, but that is usually not an IT department Mantra - otherwise how do they justify Windows. IT departments are usually about job creating and job security and if anyone could do then it would cause them to loose a job, thus the reason not having Mac on the network, they do not need IT support.

 

Anybody who claims IT departments require Windows PCs for the sake of job security should also agree that Apple should make iMacs easier to take apart and repair, as opposed to the service nightmare that it is today.  Is Apple afraid that if they made iMacs easier to take apart, then they would not be able to bill as much for service?  For home users who have never worked as professional computer technicians:  Inserting a stick of memory does not count.

 


Edited by Haggar - 4/26/12 at 6:33pm
post #20 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post

 

 

Over the years, IT folks have become more knowledgable about Apple, so there is less bias. Then IT folks are up to their eyeballs trying to maintain Windows XP and perhaps Windows 7 machines, and networks, and virus updates, and a myriad of other enterprise based systems; the last thing they need is more to maintain. IT support staff are in no danger of losing their jobs, because Windows is not going away.

 

As IT staff become more knowledgeable and willing to work with both Macs and PCs, maybe the IT departments can fire those guys who just sit at their desks and say "I only work on Macs" any time someone needs IT support.  Apple's dumbing down of Mac OS X Server might also help.  Since the dumbed-down OS X Server is supposed to be easy enough for everyone to use, those "I only do Mac" folks would no longer be needed.


Edited by Haggar - 4/26/12 at 6:39pm
post #21 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by auxio View Post

 

 

Security is only part of the picture.  IT departments also want "easy to manage/support".  That's where Apple's model shines over Google's.

 

On the Android side of things, too many cooks means too many people passing the buck (or dropping the ball) when things go wrong.  With Apple, it's a one-stop shop no matter what the problem.

 

Um, not really. We replaced our RIM's back in January with Samsung Notes. We purchased them directly from Samsung Europe, their service package is really incredible. Supporting them has also been a real easy task, much, much easier then our Apple iPhone's that some of our traders use. We normally have to send back any faulty phones to Apple and wait. Samsung gave us backups something Apple refused to deal even with large orders, so when a phone is faulty and if we can't fix it by reflashing the software, we just issue a repacement. Send the bad one to Samsung and they send us a new one that goes back on the shelf. Oh, the software, we have one rom that already has all of our software pre-installed, email, server mounts already programmed. All we do is flash a new phone and your off in exactly 4 minutes, the iPhones take at least 45 minutes for each phone to setup, plus there isn't app side loading support which is a bitch in a half so you have to login into the iTunes account and install each and every program seperatly. No, hands down a good Android phone is much better for a IT department when it comes to supporting a lot of units. Ask any IT guy who deals with both platform. The ability to back up the entire phone into a single rom is a real time saver. Not to mention and I'm sorry but we need it Android has a filemanager that can mount our servers as a normal folder on the desktop, while in the building or over VPN in the field. Not to mention our sales staff has gone completely nuts over the larger screen. 

 

We gave Apple a chance to compete they couldn't match the service nor the price that others could do. Oh and last November was the first time I had ever used a Android phone before that I has an iPhone 4 as my main phone but now that UBS has gone Galaxy Note I have to and it's hard to say but it's a much better platform for business. Joe blow consumer, oh Apple all the way but Corp stuff, I don't see it. Not saying it isn't happening because it is, I just don't get it, especially at the prices Apple charges.


Edited by Relic - 4/27/12 at 5:59pm
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post #22 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

 

 

Um, not really. We replaced our RIM's back in January with Samsung Notes. We purchased them directly from Samsung Europe, their service package is really incredible. Supporting them has also been a real easy task, much, much easier then our Apple iPhone's that some of our traders use. We normally have to send back any faulty phones to Apple and wait. Samsung gave us backups something Apple refused to deal even with large orders, so when a phone is faulty and if we can't fix it by reflashing the software, we just issue a repacement. Send the bad one to Samsung and they send us a new one that goes back on the shelf. Oh, the software, we have one rom that already has all of our software pre-installed, email, server mounts already programmed. All we do is flash a new phone and your off in exactly 4 minutes, the iPhones take at least 45 minutes for each phone to setup, plus there isn't app side loading support which is a bitch in a half so you have to login into the iTunes account and install each and every program seperatly. No, hands down a good Android phone is much better for a IT department when it comes to supporting a lot of units. Ask any IT guy who deals with both platform. The ability to back up the entire phone into a single rom is a real time saver. Not to mention and I'm sorry but we need it Android has a filemanager that can mount our servers as a normal folder on the desktop, while in the building or over VPN in the field. Not to mention our sales staff has gone completely nuts over the larger screen. 

 

We gave Apple a chance to compete they couldn't match the service nor the price that others could do. Oh and last November was the first time I had ever used a Android phone before that I has an iPhone 4 as my main phone but now that UBS has gone Galaxy Note I have to and it's hard to say but it's a much better platform for business. Joe blow consumer, oh Apple all the way but Corp stuff, I don't see it. Not saying it isn't happening because it is, I just don't get it, especially at the prices Apple charges.

 


I'm not an IT guy. So I'm not discounting or disputing what you're saying here. But based on the chart in the OP and my personal experiences with two different Fortune 500 companies over the past several years, the Android platform is not one that's being embraced by corporate America - at least not in the same way that iOS is (and RIM was). Maybe in Europe Android is being more openly embraced as an acceptable platform for corporate IT. Smart phones were becoming somewhat popular when I worked for a company that had a defense contractor as one of its divisions several years back. The Blackberry was the first to be accepted by the IT gods. Then came Windows Phone and finally iOS. But there, because of the defense division's objections (I was told based on security concerns and the open nature of the platform) Android devices are (or at least were) strictly prohibited.

 

You work for UBS in Europe? So as I said, in Europe (even at a banking institution) maybe things are different.

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post #23 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

 

 

Especially for a completely missing RIM.

 

Do you realize that Good doesn't support Blackberries?  RIM devices use their own software (Blackberry Enterprise Server) which in a lot of ways is better than Good for Enterprise.  I administer both servers at work.  I'm not a big fan of RIM handhelds (after supporting them in my job for the last 6 or 7 years), but there's a reason they aren't on the Good device list.

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