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Apple's iPhone climbs to 31% share of US smartphone market

post #1 of 58
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A new analysis claims the iPhone made up 30.7 percent of the U.S. smartphone market and 14 percent of the mobile market in the first quarter of 2012.

comScore noted Apple's steady upward climb when it released on Tuesday quarterly data from its MobiLens service, which surveyed 30,000 mobile subscribers users.

Apple's share of the smartphone market grew 1.1 percent when compared to the fourth quarter of 2011. The figures were up 0.5 percent from Apple's three-month average from February.

The Cupertino, Calif., company's growth was outpaced by the Google Android platform, which grew 3.7 percent sequentially to reach 51 percent market share.

Research in Motion and Microsoft lost out during the quarter. The BlackBerry maker fell from 16 percent in December 2011 to 12.3 percent in the March quarter, while Windows Phone maker watched its market share slip from 4.7 percent to 3.9 percent during the same period.

comScore March 2012
Source: comScore

According to the research, Apple was the third-largest handset maker in the U.S. during the March quarter. Samsung took the top spot from the survey with 26 percent, up 0.7 percent from the previous quarter. LG came in second place with 19.3 percent share. Motorola and HTC trailed Apple in fourth and fifth place, respectively.

Apple announced last month sales of 35.1 million iPhones during the March quarter.

Estimates have disagreed as to whether Samsung or Apple took the top spot among global smartphone makers fro the quarter. Strategy Analytics and IDC see Samsung as having won out, while IHS iSuppli believes Samsung shipped just 32 million smartphones.
post #2 of 58

Incredible numbers. What a crazy world we're living in. 35 million units...

 

I think share figures always should be presented with actual user figures as well. A decline in percentage for one part might look like someone is loosing customers when it's not the case. The whole smartphone market is growing, right? It just means that the one that see a decline in share isn't growing as fast as the others. It might still be healthy business though.

 

I'd like the following data accompanying the share percentage:

Share: X%

Change in share: +-X%

Number of users: X

Change in number of users: X

post #3 of 58
Correct me if I'm bad at math, but I don't think that T-Mobile has enough customers to offset Apple's majority (not plurality) at AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint. Especially not enough to kick Apple to 31%.
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post #4 of 58

Remember when the iPhone was announced and Steve Jobs hoped to claim 1% of the hand-held market? 5 years later and it is 14 times the initial goal.

post #5 of 58

1% of the handheld market which means including the feature phones
Which still does not say that this isn't an incredible feat. Kudos!

post #6 of 58

Looking at the chart, there's been a total inversion with the previous OS leaders now at the bottom and those who were not part of the old boy's club, being at the top.

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post #7 of 58

How the heck does google have 50%+. I rarely see android. Mostly iphones. 4S at that

post #8 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by MGLeet View Post

Correct me if I'm bad at math, but I don't think that T-Mobile has enough customers to offset Apple's majority (not plurality) at AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint. Especially not enough to kick Apple to 31%.

I share your scepticIsm, but it is true that 75% of AT&T's iPhone sales last quarter we're to existing iPhone owners. Depending on what happened to all those old 3GS models, new iPhone subscribers on AT&T could be as low as 1.1M.

It does seem that lots of the newcomers to smartphones make the mistake of buying an Android phone, as it is "just as good as" the iPhone. Samsung's copycat strategy is still working.

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post #9 of 58

I wonder if we will see Microsoft regaining market share in the next six months, and if it does, at whose expense... I will be surprised if the marketing effort put into Lumia doesn't pay off at least partially. However, with the release of HTC One X and Samsung Galaxy III, Nokia has a very tough battle ahead of it...


Edited by DrDoppio - 5/2/12 at 4:16am
post #10 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just_Me View Post

How the heck does google have 50%+. I rarely see android. Mostly iphones. 4S at that

I suspect there are many, many cheap ones lying in boxes and under beds in children's rooms.

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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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post #11 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Looking at the chart, there's been a total inversion with the previous OS leaders now at the bottom and those who were not part of the old boy's club, being at the top.

 

 

Could that happen again?

post #12 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just_Me View Post

How the heck does google have 50%+. I rarely see android. Mostly iphones. 4S at that

 

 

I nev er see anything except iPhones.

post #13 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I suspect there are many, many cheap ones lying in boxes and under beds in children's rooms.

You think they can be used as baby monitors?

So this means per baby two android phones sold. ;-D

post #14 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by I am a Zither Zather Zuzz View Post

 

 

Could that happen again?

Absolutely, it could all change again, don't see significant change happening in the near future but as Apple has significant loyalty amongst it's user base, it is more likely that Google are the ones who need to look over their shoulder at this stage.

post #15 of 58
I wonder what the market looks like when you exclude feature phones from the line up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

I wonder if we will see Microsoft regaining market share in the next six months, and if it does, at whose expense... I will be surprised if the marketing effort put into Lumia doesn't pay off at least partially. However, with the release of HTC One X and Samsung Galaxy III, Nokia has a very tough battle ahead of it...

I certainly hope so because WinPh deserves to be a contender based on technical competency and usefulness. I'd certainly choose it over Android.

I'm surprised that with RiM faltering for so long that they are still retaining the number 3 position in new smartphone OS share. And with a solid 13%, which I'm sure MS would be ecstatic to have.

Based on the current info and trends I don't see either MS or RiM increasing their market share.

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post #16 of 58

I see a lot of Android phones myself, but that's because I happen to know a lot of lower income people and they are on prepaid plans.  All of them say that if the iPhone ever becomes available on a prepaid plan, they'll be on it in a minute.

 

But yes, out of the people I know that can afford traditional mobile plans, it seems like almost all either have an iPhone or are planning to get one as soon as they are eligible for a subsidized upgrade.

 

I've long maintained that the day Apple makes a deal with major prepaid providers is the beginning of the end for Android.

post #17 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just_Me View Post

How the heck does google have 50%+. I rarely see android. Mostly iphones. 4S at that


I keep thinking it must be that I don't run in the same type of circles as Android users.

 

I've sat at many a table with different groups of people, young and old, and when the phones come out I see mostly iPhones, Blackberrys (yes) or old flip phones (in that order) and few, if any, Android phones.

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post #18 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tildeboy View Post

I see a lot of Android phones myself, but that's because I happen to know a lot of lower income people and they are on prepaid plans.  All of them say that if the iPhone ever becomes available on a prepaid plan, they'll be on it in a minute.

 

But yes, out of the people I know that can afford traditional mobile plans, it seems like almost all either have an iPhone or are planning to get one as soon as they are eligible for a subsidized upgrade.

 

I've long maintained that the day Apple makes a deal with major prepaid providers is the beginning of the end for Android.

"Once the iPhone is on more than just AT&T it is the beginning of the end for Android." (Everyone - Circa 2009/2010)

 

Moving goalposts much?

post #19 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post


I keep thinking it must be that I don't run in the same type of circles as Android users.

I've sat at many a table with different groups of people, young and old, and when the phones come out I see mostly iPhones, Blackberrys (yes) or old flip phones (in that order) and few, if any, Android phones.
That is likely part of it, but probably more because most Android users aren't buying top-end smartphones with that platform, but feature phones that run Android. They get some internet capabilities but they don't use them as much as iPhone users. Perhaps those buying the Galaxy S II are using their phones and buying apps as much as iPhone users, but those clearly aren't the majority of units sold.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #20 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I wonder what the market looks like when you exclude feature phones from the line up.
I certainly hope so because WinPh deserves to be a contender based on technical competency and usefulness. I'd certainly choose it over Android.
I'm surprised that with RiM faltering for so long that they are still retaining the number 3 position in new smartphone OS share. And with a solid 13%, which I'm sure MS would be ecstatic to have.
Based on the current info and trends I don't see either MS or RiM increasing their market share.

I was under the impression that feature phones are already excluded from the statistics. If I have to guess, I'd say that lower-end smartphones probably account for half of Android's share and perhaps less than 10% of iOS's...

 

Regarding RiM, I have very little hope for them. I saw their latest efforts recently and they're innovative, but that's hardly the main ingredient in market success -- inertia in the consumer's mindset, or the latest fashion -- alternatively pricing -- are more important factors.

 

I can imagine WP grabbing some current smartphone users from Android, which has a more volatile user base, but not many from iOS. On the other hand, first time smartphone buyers who get WP would probably be choosing it over an iPhone as the second choice, so that may limit iOS expansion. The second factor is less important in the US where smartphone penetration is high, and more so in growing markets such as China.

post #21 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

"Once the iPhone is on more than just AT&T it is the beginning of the end for Android." (Everyone - Circa 2009/2010)

 

Moving goalposts much?

Well I never said that, so your implication is a little disingenuous.

post #22 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tildeboy View Post

I see a lot of Android phones myself, but that's because I happen to know a lot of lower income people and they are on prepaid plans.  All of them say that if the iPhone ever becomes available on a prepaid plan, they'll be on it in a minute.

 

But yes, out of the people I know that can afford traditional mobile plans, it seems like almost all either have an iPhone or are planning to get one as soon as they are eligible for a subsidized upgrade.

 

I've long maintained that the day Apple makes a deal with major prepaid providers is the beginning of the end for Android.

 

"All of them say..." LOL.

 

No matter what these "lower income people" say, there's a very slim chance they'd be buying a $750 iPhone on a prepaid plan if they don't have a free one now. If they like the iPhone, they should make use of the generous carrier subsidy while it lasts.

post #23 of 58

Here in the UK you can get prepaid iPhones easily, but almost all the iPhone users I know are on contract because the upfront cost is too much on prepaid. If you're not a heavy user, prepaid is often cheaper over 18 or 24 months, but that depends on you being willing to spend £500 on the handset.

post #24 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

I was under the impression that feature phones are already excluded from the statistics. If I have to guess, I'd say that lower-end smartphones probably account for half of Android's share and perhaps less than 10% of iOS's...

I imagine that anything running Android on a phone is considered a smartphone at this point, but I don't think it should.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #25 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I imagine that anything running Android on a phone is considered a smartphone at this point, but I don't think it should.


Are there any currently produced dumb phones running Google-licensed Android? I don't think there are but I'm not certain.

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post #26 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I imagine that anything running Android on a phone is considered a smartphone at this point, but I don't think it should.

I understand your point since I have friends that use cheaper Android phones as feature phones -- they've never activated them and don't even have gmail accounts! Personally, I don't care much about the distinction, since I am not as interested in absolute numbers but in the trends, which would be unaffected by definitions as long as the methodology is intact.

 

Also, if dumb users buy smart phones we shouldn't blame it on the phones :)

post #27 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I imagine that anything running Android on a phone is considered a smartphone at this point, but I don't think it should.

 

I don't know how you would make a distinction.  If you go by the definition laid out here, then I don't think any Android phone can reasonably be considered a feature phone.  Maybe there is another definition, but it looks like you'd probably have to seriously blur the lines to make that case.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


Are there any currently produced dumb phones running Google-licensed Android? I don't think there are but I'm not certain.

 

I think my take on it would be that if it is a phone that runs a derivative of Android, then it's probably a smart phone.  Maybe if it's seriously crippled that it cannot do things like run add-on apps, then maybe it's a feature phone, but I don't see any reason for anyone to do that.


Edited by JeffDM - 5/2/12 at 8:45am
post #28 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
Are there any currently produced dumb phones running Google-licensed Android? I don't think there are but I'm not certain.

 

There are "smartphones" and there are "smartphones". The telecoms act as though anything with Android, WP7, and iOS must be forced to have data for no reason. You know.

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There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #29 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by MGLeet View Post

Correct me if I'm bad at math, but I don't think that T-Mobile has enough customers to offset Apple's majority (not plurality) at AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint. Especially not enough to kick Apple to 31%.


This was a survey.
post #30 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

"Once the iPhone is on more than just AT&T it is the beginning of the end for Android." (Everyone - Circa 2009/2010)

 

Moving goalposts much?

 

But everyone didn't say that.

 

Exaggerate much?

post #31 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

I wonder if we will see Microsoft regaining market share in the next six months, and if it does, at whose expense... I will be surprised if the marketing effort put into Lumia doesn't pay off at least partially. However, with the release of HTC One X and Samsung Galaxy III, Nokia has a very tough battle ahead of it...

 

Well despite Microsoft's drop in share in the above table (3 months).... their March share is the same as February. 3.9%

 

http://www.comscore.com/Press_Events/Press_Releases/2012/4/comScore_Reports_February_2012_U.S._Mobile_Subscriber_Market_Share

 

Total smartphone users have grown... so Microsoft actually grew their installed base. Might be a blip... might be the green shoots.

post #32 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Just_Me View Post

How the heck does google have 50%+. I rarely see android. Mostly iphones. 4S at that


I keep thinking it must be that I don't run in the same type of circles as Android users.

 

I've sat at many a table with different groups of people, young and old, and when the phones come out I see mostly iPhones, Blackberrys (yes) or old flip phones (in that order) and few, if any, Android phones.

 

 

All I ever see are iPhones.  

post #33 of 58
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post #34 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbsoluteDesignz View Post

"Once the iPhone is on more than just AT&T it is the beginning of the end for Android." (Everyone - Circa 2009/2010)

 

Moving goalposts much?

about every day... you only need to wait 24hrs to read another idiotic justification

 

"once (place stupidity here) Android is done"

 

you should not think much of it - iOS users for the most part represent the Dumbing down of Apple. Critical thinking is not their strong point.

post #35 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by I am a Zither Zather Zuzz View Post

 

 

I nev er see anything except iPhones.

Maybe it's true for students especially High Schools'. Do a survey, ask high school students what smart phones they want to own.

post #36 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

 

"All of them say..." LOL.

 

No matter what these "lower income people" say, there's a very slim chance they'd be buying a $750 iPhone on a prepaid plan if they don't have a free one now. If they like the iPhone, they should make use of the generous carrier subsidy while it lasts.

I don't imagine they'd be buying the latest model, but given that you can now get "last year's model" free with contract on traditional mobile plans, I think it is very likely that if a prepaid option becomes available, it will also offer "last year's model" at a much lower price of $200 - $300.  And yes, many of these lower income people have Android smartphones, not feature phones, from services like Boost Mobile where they had to pay $200 or more for the phone up front.

 

Lower income doesn't always mean "never has any money", often it means that they simply have poor credit or don't have a reliably predictable monthly income.  So when they come into some cash, they splurge.  May not be the smartest way to run your finances, but it doesn't change the reality of people doing it.

 

Frankly, if Boost Mobile came up with an iPhone option, I'd give it serious thought myself.  They offer unlimited plans that work out to $55 a month for their Android phones, half what I pay AT&T on a "traditional" plan.

post #37 of 58
I have friends that have new, but super cheap per-paid, Android branded handsets that cannot play the majority of games on Google Play. The phones struggle with displaying a web page. They remind me of something much slower than the original iPhone.

They come close to being just a feature phone since most of the app experience is not available to them.
post #38 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tildeboy View Post

I don't imagine they'd be buying the latest model, but given that you can now get "last year's model" free with contract on traditional mobile plans, I think it is very likely that if a prepaid option becomes available, it will also offer "last year's model" at a much lower price of $200 - $300.  And yes, many of these lower income people have Android smartphones, not feature phones, from services like Boost Mobile where they had to pay $200 or more for the phone up front.

 

Lower income doesn't always mean "never has any money", often it means that they simply have poor credit or don't have a reliably predictable monthly income.  So when they come into some cash, they splurge.  May not be the smartest way to run your finances, but it doesn't change the reality of people doing it.

 

Frankly, if Boost Mobile came up with an iPhone option, I'd give it serious thought myself.  They offer unlimited plans that work out to $55 a month for their Android phones, half what I pay AT&T on a "traditional" plan.

 

Well, the 3GS still goes for $400, so I don't imagine one will ever be able to get even an unused old model iPhone for less than that. And yes, I agree that there are decent pre-paid options, which I wish people would use more in order to break the current horrible carrier model.

 

 

 

Quote:

 

Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

I have friends that have new, but super cheap per-paid, Android branded handsets that cannot play the majority of games on Google Play. The phones struggle with displaying a web page. They remind me of something much slower than the original iPhone.
They come close to being just a feature phone since most of the app experience is not available to them.

 

There are many cheap phones out there, but they are a waste of money. Tell your friends to get HTC One S -- an amazing phone not much different, yet cheaper than the One X flagship.

post #39 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I don't know how you would make a distinction.
Didn't Nokia use Symbian on dumb phones, feature phones and smartphones? How were those models differentiated?
Quote:
If you go by the definition laid out here, then I don't think any Android phone can reasonably be considered a feature phone.  Maybe there is another definition, but it looks like you'd probably have to seriously blur the lines to make that case.
The definition should be changing as the distinction changes. If you look at the original smartphones they would be laughed at today if you tried to claim they are modern smartphones. The Samsung Dart is an example of what I'd classify as a feature phone. As Android grows more and more comparatively un-smart devices will be getting Android, but does simply having Android installed mean they are in the same category and have the same utility as Galaxy S II and HTC One? i don't think so.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #40 of 58

Why do you think the Dart is a feature phone?  What specific aspects make it not a smart phone?   I think it's better to just do away with the class than to try to arrive at a more contrived definition.

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