or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Apple's reputation intact after negative tax avoidance press
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple's reputation intact after negative tax avoidance press

post #1 of 46
Thread Starter 
A report calls Apple's reputation "Teflon," referring to recent revelations of the company's tax practices and finds that public opinion went mostly unchanged when the story broke a week ago.

U.K.-based YouGov's BrandIndex, a daily brand perception tracker, found that when compared to a similar tax "scandal" involving GE, Apple faired very well and saw almost no decline in public reputation.

The online survey, which asks a panel of 2.5 million worldwide respondents about various brand issues, compared the fallout from the New York Times story regarding Apple's "diverted taxes" with another piece from the same paper involving GE's "zero tax bill." The exact number of respondents that participated in this particular study was not reported.

When survey respondents were asked the question, "Would you be proud or embarrassed to work for this brand?" Apple's "Reputation Score" went up from 52 to 58 a few days following the NYT article before eventually leveling out at its current 51. In comparison, when it was reported that GE made $14.2 billion in profits in 2010 but wasn't required to pay taxes and instead claimed a tax benefit of $3.2 billion, the company's score dropped severely. It took GE two months to bounce back to a score of 33 after falling to 23 a day after the story ran, followed by a bottom of 14 a week later. The survey measurements range from a score of 100 to -100.

BrandIndex
Source: YouGov


Apple's tax practices made headlines when it was revealed that the world's most valuable tech company diverts parts of its international revenue stream to allegedly avoid paying high U.S. state taxes. According to the Times, Apple pays a 9.8 percent tax rate, though that number has been disputed.
post #2 of 46

I think the reason is that it's a huge stretch to compare Apple to GE.  GE paid zero taxes.  None at all.  Apple paid billions, although some think it should have been even higher.  That's a pretty big difference.

post #3 of 46

Also, I read a Forbes article that claimed the NY Times report was sloppy reporting taxes based on 2010 profits against 2011 profits. The article claimed that Apple's tax rate was more like corporate normal 24% in 2010.
 

post #4 of 46

The NYT article was purely a hit piece. Why they did it, I have no idea. I'm just glad it didn't work.

post #5 of 46

I wonder if the larger public has now learned to ignore anything negative the media says about Apple since there have been so many manufactured controversies? It must be strange for all those millions of people who own Apple products to be constantly fed stories about how they don't work as advertised, explode, etc, when their own products work just fine. Or to be told they're a security nightmare when they've never encountered a virus or malware. Add in the recent revelations about Mike Daisey and at this point the public probably thinks anyone saying anything negative about Apple is either a rabid anti-fan or has an agenda.

post #6 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booga View Post

I think the reason is that it's a huge stretch to compare Apple to GE.  GE paid zero taxes.  None at all.  Apple paid billions, although some think it should have been even higher.  That's a pretty big difference.

Bingo! That is a huge difference.

 

It's really sad that people would even be upset with these companies for fully-complying with the existing tax code. They should be livid with their legislators who both spend their money and who make up the tax code, complete with all of its loopholes that that these companies legally take adavantage of.

post #7 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by penchanted View Post

Bingo! That is a huge difference.

 

It's really sad that people would even be upset with these companies for fully-complying with the existing tax code. They should be livid with their legislators who both spend their money and who make up the tax code, complete with all of its loopholes that that these companies legally take adavantage of.

 

It makes no difference to any of us personally what another person or another company paid in terms of taxes. All that matters to us personally is that WE don't like the idea that WE are getting stuck paying for everything. Tell me I'm wrong.

 

Also, it's time the US eliminates the income tax. It's harmful to Americans and distorts our economy in a very bad way. It is a needless disincentive to doing well. Of course, I believe all taxes are wrong-headed, but a flat tax or a consumption tax may be where our country is headed.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #8 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

 

It makes no difference to any of us personally what another person or another company paid in terms of taxes. All that matters to us personally is that WE don't like the idea that WE are getting stuck paying for everything. Tell me I'm wrong.

 

Not exactly.  I really like my country, and don't mind paying taxes to keep it working.  But when I'm paying my fair share but see others not doing so, I don't like it.  Some may argue over what constitutes a "fair share", but almost no one would argue 0% is it.  Thus the huge difference between GE and Apple.

post #9 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
Also, it's time the US eliminates the income tax. It's harmful to Americans and distorts our economy in a very bad way. It is a needless disincentive to doing well.

 

We introduced it to pay for the Reconstruction after the Civil War.

 

… I think we're reconstructed by now. lol.gif

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #10 of 46

"Apple's reputation intact after negative tax avoidance press"

 

American's despise our government nearly as much as we do the corporations which run it.  Given that the 99% are every bit as greedy and stupid as the 1% who own us but considerably less well informed, it's hardly surprising that we flock to whoever provides the tastiest bread and the most entertaining circuses.  

 

Of course few things are as fickle as brand "loyalty," and the moment Apple ceases to titillate and amuse the masses will flock to some other logo, in pursuit of a distinction but not a difference which will change absolutely nothing.  Give us toys or give us…  Oh, that's right.  All we want is toys.

post #11 of 46
Ask yourself if it was your money wouldn't you legally shelter as much of it against taxes as you could? Don't you take as many deductions as you can to do that now?!?

Apple it to be commended for demonstrating good business practice hat thrifty money management.

The fact that the NYT wrote the story is a matter of poor editorial choice. Nothing is louder that the snap sound as wallets snap closed to things like subscriptions!
post #12 of 46

Well, H&R BLOCK doesn't win customers by promising to "make you pay your fair share."

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #13 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

We introduced it to pay for the Reconstruction after the Civil War.

 

… I think we're reconstructed by now. lol.gif

 

And we're most definitely heading toward "deconstruction".

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #14 of 46

Goes to show how detached they are.  The people know who is benefitting from the Government and its bureaucracy.

An Apple man since 1977
Reply
An Apple man since 1977
Reply
post #15 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booga View Post

 

Not exactly.  I really like my country, and don't mind paying taxes to keep it working.  But when I'm paying my fair share but see others not doing so, I don't like it.  Some may argue over what constitutes a "fair share", but almost no one would argue 0% is it.  Thus the huge difference between GE and Apple.

 

I love the US, but I don't love wasteful government. The problem is, everyone thinks that THEIR pet project or government funded kickback isn't wasteful. This is why I'd support no income tax, no minimum wage, no price controls and no bailouts or support for the oil industry, car companies, banking, housing, farms, etc. Level the playing field, get the nitpickers out of our way and let competition rebuild America.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #16 of 46

Yea because the entire US income tax system is a gigantic fraud anyhow, and people are waking up to it:

 

read the book:

 
Watch the videos:
 
Also the documentary movie, America: Freedom to Fascism:
post #17 of 46

 

Your links are all about income tax. What does it have to do with this story (VAT/corporate tax)?

 

lol.gif

 

Now read the truth...

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irwin_Schiff

 

"Irwin A. Schiff (born in February 24, 1928) is a prominent figure in the United States tax protestermovement. Schiff is known for writing and promoting literature that claims the United States income tax is applied incorrectly. He has lost several civil cases against the federal government and has a record of multiple convictions for various federal tax crimes. Schiff is serving a 13-plus year sentence for tax crimes (with his location listed as the Terre Haute Federal Correctional Institution). His projected release date is October 7, 2016.[1]"

post #18 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

 

Your links are all about income tax. What does it have to do with this story (VAT/corporate tax)?

 

lol.gif

 

Now read the truth...

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irwin_Schiff

 

"Irwin A. Schiff (born in February 24, 1928) is a prominent figure in the United States tax protestermovement. Schiff is known for writing and promoting literature that claims the United States income tax is applied incorrectly. He has lost several civil cases against the federal government and has a record of multiple convictions for various federal tax crimes. Schiff is serving a 13-plus year sentence for tax crimes (with his location listed as the Terre Haute Federal Correctional Institution). His projected release date is October 7, 2016.[1]"

 

Although it is true that the Constitution allows Congress many enumerated powers, "authority over financial and budgetary matters, through the enumerated power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United States"*, there is also a valid argument by "Eric Patashnik, (who) suggests that much of Congress's power to manage the budget has been lost when the entitlement state expanded since 'entitlements were institutionally detached from Congress's ordinary legislative routine and rhythm.'"*

 

* http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powers_of_the_United_States_Congress

 

You may subscribe to the notion that everyone must "pay their fair share", whereas a significant number of us believe there is no such thing as a fair share, because the "rules" about what is considered "fair" are never applied equally. It isn't the job of the government to determine what is fair. That power belongs to individuals and we don't like being forced into obligations and debts to others.


Edited by SpamSandwich - 5/8/12 at 8:28pm

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #19 of 46

Apple doesn't avoid tax.  It merely chooses in which jurisdicition to place its taxable activities.  Why should the US want all of the tax to the exclusion of the rest of the workd?  Pure greed, that's why.

post #20 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdfetof View Post

Apple doesn't avoid tax.  It merely chooses in which jurisdicition to place its taxable activities.  Why should the US want all of the tax to the exclusion of the rest of the workd?  Pure greed, that's why.

One man's tax avoidance is another man's tax minimalisation.
post #21 of 46

This is somewhat reassuring, that most people either don't care or don't fall for this type of horse-shit sensationalism and manufactured outrages. Which is all it's been, everything from Foxconn, to this newest tax 'controversy', has all been mindless, cynical click-bait with no real intrinsic value. 

post #22 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

 

I love the US, but I don't love wasteful government. The problem is, everyone thinks that THEIR pet project or government funded kickback isn't wasteful. This is why I'd support no income tax, no minimum wage, no price controls and no bailouts or support for the oil industry, car companies, banking, housing, farms, etc. Level the playing field, get the nitpickers out of our way and let competition rebuild America.

 

I would agree that the tax code is a mess, but do you really understand what it would mean to have no government?  The US is a complex organism, and if you remove all regulation and control you don't get some ideal free market, what you get is a twitching mass of uncontrolled cancerous cell growth.  There's an old saying that the fire code is written in blood -- every regulation is there because of some terrible disaster that happened.  Similarly with many other safety laws.  The financial regulations adopted after the great depression avoided another one until they were dismantled.  The truth is that markets aren't very good at regulating themselves.  In a truly free market, companies would literally kill each other.  Polluters would save a few cents by killing the fish that others depend on, and by dramatically raising their neighbors' medical costs and shortening their lives.  We have no choice.  We can't get rid of government.  We have to make it work.

post #23 of 46

And most of Apple 100 billion dollar cash is in Asian banks. America will probably never see that money. 

Mac IIcx, Mac Quadra 800, Mac Performa 5200, Power Mac 8600, LaserWriter, iPhone 3G, iPad 3G, iPhone 4S | MacBook Pro, 27" iMac, iPad 3 LTE

Reply

Mac IIcx, Mac Quadra 800, Mac Performa 5200, Power Mac 8600, LaserWriter, iPhone 3G, iPad 3G, iPhone 4S | MacBook Pro, 27" iMac, iPad 3 LTE

Reply
post #24 of 46

Yes, corporate income tax -- it's part of the same, he covers these issues.  VAT is not in the US.  

 

Wow, so you attack the messenger who discovered information that exposes the scam, and all you do is attack.  I can tell you are a true intellectual.  

 

Next thing you will tell us is that the government never railroads anyone, and that the messenger, Schiff, is not a political prisoner -- which is what he is in essence.  If all you do is stay this superficial, all you will give is responses like that below.  

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

 

Your links are all about income tax. What does it have to do with this story (VAT/corporate tax)?

 

lol.gif

 

Now read the truth...

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irwin_Schiff

 

"Irwin A. Schiff (born in February 24, 1928) is a prominent figure in the United States tax protestermovement. Schiff is known for writing and promoting literature that claims the United States income tax is applied incorrectly. He has lost several civil cases against the federal government and has a record of multiple convictions for various federal tax crimes. Schiff is serving a 13-plus year sentence for tax crimes (with his location listed as the Terre Haute Federal Correctional Institution). His projected release date is October 7, 2016.[1]"

post #25 of 46

You mean the United States of the World?  After all, is that not what the globalists like Obama and Bush and many others have been pushing us towards.  Destroying the sovereignty and Constitution, and propping up the the communist-founded United Nations.  After all, who funds the UN most, the US does -- we need to get out of the UN!  

 

The globalist goals are to lower the standard of living of the US and raise the rest of the world, and destroy nations and bring a one world government.  This is the road to the destruction of our freedoms.  

 

The UN wants a global income tax -- are you ready for even MORE insanity?  I am not.  Enough is enough.  

 

Campaign for Liberty, for those who are awake:

http://www.campaignforliberty.org

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mercury99 View Post

And most of Apple 100 billion dollar cash is in Asian banks. America will probably never see that money. 

post #26 of 46
Fully agree. Apple's following our current tax laws, legally. All companies do the same, some use even more allowed loopholes.

If anything, we need to TELL our legislatures to SIMPLIFY THE FEDERAL TAX CODE. As a byproduct, many/all of the expensive loopholes will be gone. This is the real problem -- congressional politicians (especially the career politicians) are giving away or bankrupting our nation.
The Truth is difficult to see, and more difficult to say — My God
Reply
The Truth is difficult to see, and more difficult to say — My God
Reply
post #27 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

A report calls Apple's reputation "Teflon," referring to recent revelations of the company's tax practices and finds that public opinion went mostly unchanged when the story broke a week ago.

 

A revelation? What revelation? Is it a revelation that normal Americans are no longer shocked by stories of wealthy companies taking advantage of tax laws to pay less taxes? Just like we're not shocked any more by reports of Congressmen passing pork-barrel legislation wasting millions on pet projects or accepting millions from lobbyists. Move along...nothing to see here.

"You can't fall off the floor"   From 128k Mac to 8GB MBP

Reply

"You can't fall off the floor"   From 128k Mac to 8GB MBP

Reply
post #28 of 46

I suggest to read Forbes’ opinion on the NYT report, before starting “tax avoidance” discussions: http://www.forbes.com/sites/timworstall/2012/04/30/apples-9-8-tax-rate-new-york-times-ignorance-again/

 

As it was said before NYT piece has nothing to do with the reality, but everything with fabricated scoop. For the sake of humanity I hope that Apple’s ‘teflon’ reputation is the result of people still having critical opinion on media reports, as opposed to blind Apple fanaticism.

post #29 of 46

Apple is a publicly listed company. As a shareholder I would be pissed off if they did not take all legal means to reduce their tax burden. In fact, they may be negligent in regards to their stockholder obligation if they did not do this.

 

This whole tax haven thing is only news in so far as various national governments are able to alter their tax laws in the future to clamp down on these currently legal tax avoidance measures. It will cut into profits for big companies like Apple and Google.

post #30 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by chabig View Post

The NYT article was purely a hit piece. Why they did it, I have no idea. I'm just glad it didn't work.

The reason why they did it is simple.  The NYT is a bunch of liberals and Apple is a successful corporation and liberals hate corporations.

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

 

Although it is true that the Constitution allows Congress many enumerated powers, "authority over financial and budgetary matters, through the enumerated power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United States"*, there is also a valid argument by "Eric Patashnik, (who) suggests that much of Congress's power to manage the budget has been lost when the entitlement state expanded since 'entitlements were institutionally detached from Congress's ordinary legislative routine and rhythm.'" ...

 

The income tax is explicitly authorized by the Constitution in the 16th Amendment:

 

The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration.

 

The 16th Amendment, along with every other Amendment, is just as much a part of the constitution as the original Articles (or, even more so, in cases where they override or modify clauses in the original Articles). This is why the argument against the income tax is a fool's argument.


Edited by anonymouse - 5/9/12 at 5:24am
post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyforall View Post

You mean the United States of the World?  After all, is that not what the globalists like Obama and Bush and many others have been pushing us towards.  Destroying the sovereignty and Constitution, and propping up the the communist-founded United Nations.  After all, who funds the UN most, the US does -- we need to get out of the UN!

 

How do you figure it was communist founded?  The League of Nations (forerunner to the UN) was started by Woodrow Wilson.  The initial member states of the UN were the Security Council (France, the Republic of China, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom and the United States) and _46_ other nations.  How exactly is this communist founded?  Yes, there were communist countries involved, but it wasn't just them and this was post-WW2 and both sides were trying to keep things from going toward war again.  You have to have both sides working together to keep peace.

 

This simple bit of information can be found from 5 seconds of Googling.   

post #33 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by poke View Post

I wonder if the larger public has now learned to ignore anything negative the media says about Apple since there have been so many manufactured controversies? It must be strange for all those millions of people who own Apple products to be constantly fed stories about how they don't work as advertised, explode, etc, when their own products work just fine. Or to be told they're a security nightmare when they've never encountered a virus or malware. Add in the recent revelations about Mike Daisey and at this point the public probably thinks anyone saying anything negative about Apple is either a rabid anti-fan or has an agenda.

Well, I personally have issues with my WiFi (iMac, MacBook Air), an issue that "doesn't exist". I've had the iPhone connection issues(but Apple solved that with a free case, so that's fine by me). I have a serious gripe with Lion which I hate, but I'll admit it's a bit of a personal thing more than a "issue" per se. I have a serious gripe, also, with Apple's cables (they suck hard, they cost 26 to 75 euros and they spoil in a year or so). Most people I know also have issues with their cables (USB iPhone, Macbook Air charger...), where the plastic yellows out and dies very fast. I want something stronger, and since my 10 years old black thinkpad cable is just as good as brand new, I know Apple can do it. 

 

 

Point: Apple products are far from issue-less. Obviously though, my iPhone did not explode, start spewing liters of acid or any other bizarre stuff :p

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply
post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by SSquirrel View Post

 

How do you figure it was communist founded?  The League of Nations (forerunner to the UN) was started by Woodrow Wilson.  The initial member states of the UN were the Security Council (France, the Republic of China, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom and the United States) and _46_ other nations.  How exactly is this communist founded?  Yes, there were communist countries involved, but this was post-WW2 and both sides were trying to keep things from going toward war again. 

Also, many communist countries argue the UN is USA-led due to funding from the US being huge.

 

I guess everyone sees what they fear most...

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply
post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDCragg View Post

The reason why they did it is simple.  The NYT is a bunch of liberals and Apple is a successful corporation and liberals hate corporations.
But they don't normally hate liberal corporations. Which is what Apple is.
post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

The income tax is explicitly authorized by the Constitution in the 16th Amendment:


The 16th Amendment, along with every other Amendment, is just as much a part of the constitution as the original Articles (or, even more so, in cases where they override or modify clauses in the original Articles). This is why the argument against the income tax is a fool's argument.

Beyond that, the U.S. Supreme Court has affirmed that the income tax is perfectly legal - and has totally squashed all the related arguments (such as the claim that salary is not an income or that business profits are not income).

The anti-income tax people are free to stop paying U.S. income taxes any time they want. Emigrate. That way, you won't be using any of the services that you object to paying for, either.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


But they don't normally hate liberal corporations. Which is what Apple is.

 

Steve Jobs, an ultra capitalist, managed to position Apple as a "cool" and "alternative" company.  They were the underdog up against the Microsoft corporate machine.  With Apple becoming larger and more mainstream corporate and with Jobs dying this is probably changing.  Apple is now the biggest corporate target of all except for the oil companies.  Plus the writers at NYT want to advance their careers.  It's hard to do that talking about how "cool" Apple is.  It's easy to advance your career in the liberal media though if you jump on the anti-corporate lynch mob and go after the biggest "star".

post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightknight View Post

Well, I personally have issues with my WiFi (iMac, MacBook Air), an issue that "doesn't exist". I've had the iPhone connection issues(but Apple solved that with a free case, so that's fine by me). I have a serious gripe with Lion which I hate, but I'll admit it's a bit of a personal thing more than a "issue" per se. I have a serious gripe, also, with Apple's cables (they suck hard, they cost 26 to 75 euros and they spoil in a year or so). Most people I know also have issues with their cables (USB iPhone, Macbook Air charger...), where the plastic yellows out and dies very fast. I want something stronger, and since my 10 years old black thinkpad cable is just as good as brand new, I know Apple can do it. 

 

 

Point: Apple products are far from issue-less. Obviously though, my iPhone did not explode, start spewing liters of acid or any other bizarre stuff :p

 

I have had issues with Wi-Fi myself but the issue has vanished since OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion.  Completely, absolutely vanished.  In fact, I would dare say that most of the issues were removed in Mac OS X 10.7 Lion.

 

I haven't had significant connection issues that weren't the likely result of poor signal strength.

 

I don't understand your complaints about Mac OS X Lion but then you didn't state them either.  Mac OS X Lion may be the most secure, released operating system available.

 

The original iPhone cables were pretty horrible but the latest cables seem to have improved.  Apple MagSafe has definitely improved as well.

 

 

In all fairness to the poster to whom you replied, he/she is likely referring to Antennagate, which you mentioned, where Apple reported that 0.55% of iPhone purchasers were plagued sufficiently to inform AppleCare.  Antennagate was a legitimate complaint by many users but the rhetoric from competitors and media outlets vastly over-reported the issue.  Similarly, Batterygate was a significant issue to many iPhone users which was significantly overblown.  Likewise, Heatgate for the new iPad 3rd generation) was vastly overestimated as an issue.

 

In contrast, Google Android receives a pass on virtually every issue.  Android forums are lit up like a Christmas tree quite often with significant issues, proponents simply refuse to acknowledge the issues:

 

Battery Life (excellent battery life is the exception rather than the rule)

Fragmentation

Google Play (formerly Android Market) (missing many basic features that iTunes has had for years)

Horrible Product Integration 

Lack of Standards (credit to Microsoft who implements strict standards for using their OS)

Malware

Memory Management (ala "Mutli-tasking")

Poor Enterprise Management tools

Software Updates

User Experience (Inconsistent UI, Poor UI responsiveness, Inconsistent Feature Implementation)

Wi-Fi Connectivity


Edited by MacBook Pro - 5/9/12 at 6:59am
post #39 of 46

I see no reason why any company should pay more taxes than it absolutely has to. Businesses are run for the benefit of their owners, not the benefit of government tax collectors. I would consider a company that did not minimize taxes to be incompetently managed. I would be willing to bet that Apple and GE's critics take every deduction they can get, too.

post #40 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Beyond that, the U.S. Supreme Court has affirmed that the income tax is perfectly legal - and has totally squashed all the related arguments (such as the claim that salary is not an income or that business profits are not income).
The anti-income tax people are free to stop paying U.S. income taxes any time they want. Emigrate. That way, you won't be using any of the services that you object to paying for, either.

 

The Supreme Court has also affirmed that no one is obligated to arrange their financial affairs to pay more taxes than they have to. This is one of the first cases you study in income tax law. Even IRS agents know it. The fact is, corporate taxes are double or triple taxation on the same income. The corporation pays taxes. Then the shareholders have to pay taxes on any money they take out of the corporation. They also pay taxes when they sell the shares at a profit. The United States has one of the highest real corporate tax rates in the world. Just like any other entity, the US government competes with other nations for government services. Apple did, in fact, emigrate. They pay taxes in the countries where they do  business. The United States has no moral reason to expect to collect taxes on money made in other countries.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Apple's reputation intact after negative tax avoidance press