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Google cleared for Motorola purchase after receiving Chinese regulatory approval

post #1 of 97
Thread Starter 
Google and Motorola Mobility both revealed on Saturday that they have received Chinese regulatory approval for their proposed merger and expect to soon close on the deal.

After receiving permission in February to move ahead with the merger from the European Commission and U.S. Department of Justice, Google had been waiting for China as the final jurisdiction to sign off on the transaction. Chinese law requires that companies doing sales of more than $63 million domestic or and $1.5 billion globally must seek approve from its Ministry of Commerce.

?We are pleased the deal has received approval in all jurisdictions,? Motorola Mobility told Bloomberg in a statement that confirmed approval in China. ?We expect to close imminently.?

Google said simply that its stance on the deal "has not changed" and that it is looking forward to completing the acquisition.

According to the report, China's Ministry of Commerce declared that Google must keep its Android mobile operating system free and open for the next five years as a condition of the approval.

Google announced last August that it had agreed to buy Motorola for $12.5 billion in a move that would "supercharge the Android ecosystem" while allowing Motorola to continue to run as a separate business. Google CEO Larry Page also revealed that the acquisition was meant to "better protect Android from anti-competitive threats from Microsoft, Apple and other companies."

Along with Motorola's cache of over 17,000 patents, Google will also pick up Motorola's legal disputes. As such, Google will face off against Apple once the deal is completed. Apple and Motorola are currently engaged in a complicated patent battle across multiple countries. Most recently, Apple succeeded in having a case against Motorola and HTC consolidated.
post #2 of 97

Moto really deserved this.  They had plenty of chances to develop and market products that would be very competitive with Apple.  But...  Moto just couldn't think along the same lines as Apple. Lead, follow or get bought out.

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post #3 of 97

Paraphrasing Oscar Wilde, there are only two tragedies in life: one is, not getting what you want; the other.....

post #4 of 97

WTF?  Two American companies.  Why do they bother getting Chinese approval?  Are they running it by Luxemburg also?
 

post #5 of 97

If Google/Moto want to do business in China, they need to grease the wheels...
 

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post #6 of 97

S_rew them.  If they ban over something they should have no say over, then we just ban some of their companies.  They need to sell to us way more than we need to sell to them.
 

post #7 of 97

The US step in to protect the funds of 2 private international companies that happen to have headquarters in the US? Not the kind of escalation anyone wants...

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post #8 of 97

Google needs China and Europe approval before buying Motorola. The whole point of Google buying Motorola is about those patents. It does not have anything to do with Chinese or European companies at all. Just Can't believe some people do not understand this basic knowledge.

 

Suppose Google sues Apple over the infringement of Motorola-owned patents in the major markets like the US/Europe/China, they need to gain approval for Google's purchase of Motorola in the first place; otherwise no government will enforce Google's Motorola patents.


Edited by peter236 - 5/20/12 at 3:01am
post #9 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexander Stuy View Post

WTF?  Two American companies.  Why do they bother getting Chinese approval?  Are they running it by Luxemburg also?
 

 

Well seeing as Microsoft was successful in obtaining an injunction banning the importation of Motorola Android devices into the US, Google needs other markets to sell their stuff in.

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post #10 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexander Stuy View Post

WTF?  Two American companies.  Why do they bother getting Chinese approval?  Are they running it by Luxemburg also?

 

You really need to get past the 1960s.

Business is global. Apple, for example, has more than 1/2 of its business outside of the U.S. The fact that you are a U.S. company does not give you the right to violate local laws. You need to ensure compliance with countries where you do a significant amount of business.


In the end, though, I predict that this move will be the thing that saves Windows Mobile:
1. The license fees for Windows Mobile are probably no greater than what Android licensees must pay Microsoft, anyway.
2. Google refuses to indemnify licensees over patent infringement. Microsoft, OTOH, defends its OS.
3. Android licensees will see that they are licensing an OS from their competitor. Anyone who thinks that Motorola/Google won't have an advantage when it comes to Android are kidding themselves.


OTOH, think of the increased penetration this gives Google into your home. The set-top box that connects your TV to the cable company or satellite dish will be Google's to control. Anyone want to bet that they won't be tracking your viewing habits? I could also see other items 'updated' to include Android. For example, your home phone could have a small Android screen on it giving Google another way to track you.
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post #11 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexander Stuy View Post

S_rew them.  If they ban over something they should have no say over, then we just ban some of their companies.  They need to sell to us way more than we need to sell to them.
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyberzombie View Post

The US step in to protect the funds of 2 private international companies that happen to have headquarters in the US? Not the kind of escalation anyone wants...

 

You both are totally clueless as to what this is all about.

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post #12 of 97
so getting china's approval means that china will honor google's patents?...

i suppose all h#ll will break lose because of this... /sarcasm
post #13 of 97
What I've always found interesting about the deal is that Motorola Mobility produces cable modems.

Which would basically allow Google to penetrate into the living room pretty easily by simply including Android in cable modems.

It looks like this might not happen as content providers aren't too happy with Google and actively shunning Motorola modems.

Google might just have to sell the cable modem business:
http://www.theverge.com/2012/3/7/2851646/google-to-sell-motorola-cable-box-unit-rumor
post #14 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

OTOH, think of the increased penetration this gives Google into your home. The set-top box that connects your TV to the cable company or satellite dish will be Google's to control. Anyone want to bet that they won't be tracking your viewing habits? 

Your viewing habits are being tracked now. Cable and satellite companies and yes even AppleTV already know what you're watching every minute. They know if you change channels during commercials, indicating an active viewer, can "see" when people are probably home, your likely political leanings, whether you probably have children and loads of other information that becomes even more valuable when they combine with known subscriber info and data from other sources like smartphone use. 

 

...and you're worried about what an ad-provider under the watchful eye of the FTC knows about you? The government already determined they'd keep an eye on them. I'd be just as concerned about those that aren't under a microscope as Google is. Other than insiders none of us really know what Verizon, Apple, Duetche-Telecom or a DirectTV  has collected and shares about us. It's already understood why Google would want to follow you. What's the interest of the others?

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post #15 of 97

I think it's no coincidence that Google recently announced plans to give partners "early access" to Android. That's exactly what they need to do to give Motorola a massive advantage over competitors. Everybody will be allowed into the early access program for political reasons but Motorola will obviously have better access than everyone else. The idea that they're going to run it as a separate company was already absurd - Motorola is losing money so Google is essentially subsidising it by hundreds of millions of dollars per quarter by acquiring it - but this move makes it even harder to say they're separate. Motorola will have access to Android while it's in development.

post #16 of 97
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Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Your viewing habits are being tracked now. Cable and satellite companies and yes even AppleTV already know what you're watching every minute. They know if you change channels during commercials, indicating an active viewer, can "see" when people are probably home, your likely political leanings, whether you probably have children and loads of other information that becomes even more valuable when they combine with known subscriber info and data from other sources like smartphone use. 

 

...and you're worried about what an ad-provider under the watchful eye of the FTC knows about you? The government already determined they'd keep an eye on them. I'd be just as concerned about those that aren't under a microscope as Google is. Other than insiders none of us really know what Verizon, Apple, Duetche-Telecom or a DirectTV  has collected and shares about us. It's already understood why Google would want to follow you. What's the interest of the others?

 

Hell, if we ever needed any evidence that you're a paid Google shill, then there it is.

 

You may as well provide us with percentage levels of your share after this utterly ridiculous comment.

 

"Everybody is watching you, including Apple, so you may as well trust Google."

 

That 'ad-provider under the watchful eye of the FTC' has committed numerous privacy offences in the past few years alone.

 

And you're advocating we just go ahead and trust them?

 

Fark.

You.

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post #17 of 97
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Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
Your viewing habits are being tracked now. Cable and satellite companies and yes even AppleTV already know what you're watching every minute. They know if you change channels during commercials…

 

Blatant lies. Nielsen households remain the only ones tracked.

post #18 of 97
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Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Your viewing habits are being tracked now. Cable and satellite companies and yes even AppleTV already know what you're watching every minute. They know if you change channels during commercials, indicating an active viewer, can "see" when people are probably home, your likely political leanings, whether you probably have children and loads of other information that becomes even more valuable when they combine with known subscriber info and data from other sources like smartphone use. 

...and you're worried about what an ad-provider under the watchful eye of the FTC knows about you? The government already determined they'd keep an eye on them. I'd be just as concerned about those that aren't under a microscope as Google is. Other than insiders none of us really know what Verizon, Apple, Duetche-Telecom or a DirectTV  has collected and shares about us. It's already understood why Google would want to follow you. What's the interest of the others?

Really?

I wonder why then the ad industry still relies on data based on a (relatively small) sample of households and their viewing habits to spend the $68B that they annually do. Why haven't the cable companies monetized the heck out of it!?
post #19 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Your viewing habits are being tracked now. Cable and satellite companies and yes even AppleTV already know what you're watching every minute. They know if you change channels during commercials, indicating an active viewer, can "see" when people are probably home, your likely political leanings, whether you probably have children and loads of other information that becomes even more valuable when they combine with known subscriber info and data from other sources like smartphone use. 

...and you're worried about what an ad-provider under the watchful eye of the FTC knows about you? The government already determined they'd keep an eye on them. I'd be just as concerned about those that aren't under a microscope as Google is. Other than insiders none of us really know what Verizon, Apple, Duetche-Telecom or a DirectTV  has collected and shares about us. It's already understood why Google would want to follow you. What's the interest of the others?

As you've been told, this is absolutely false. The cable company has no way of knowing what I'm watching.

But even if they did, that gives them one piece of information. It's not like Google who knows more about you than your parents.

Quote:
Originally Posted by z3r0 View Post

What I've always found interesting about the deal is that Motorola Mobility produces cable modems.
Which would basically allow Google to penetrate into the living room pretty easily by simply including Android in cable modems.

I've been saying that since the acquisition was announced. I'm glad someone is paying attention.
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post #20 of 97
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Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


Really?
I wonder why then the ad industry still relies on data based on a (relatively small) sample of households and their viewing habits to spend the $68B that they annually do. Why haven't the cable companies monetized the heck out of it!?

What makes you believe they still rely on just small viewer samples like they did "back in the day", and what makes you think your viewing habits aren't being monetized?

 

The evidence of today's tracking is pretty easy to see. As an example, if you use either Verizon FIOS or DirectTV you can search the most-viewed shows right now, fast proof that they know what each viewer is watching at that moment. You can see your own history, proof they also keep a record of your viewership. Now couple FIOS TV/Internet info with smartphone tracking via your Verizon Wireless service (you could substitute similar services supplied by Apple iPhones/iPads and Apple TV, or the ATT/DirectTV combo) They know your address and contact numbers, when you leave for work, where you work, your income, when or whether you leave for lunch, when you get home from work, whether anyone else stays home during the day watching TV or using the internet, what time your children get home from school. . .

 

but you're really concerned about Google. They're only a few of the trees in the forest.

 

EDIT: The current most-viewed show is SportsCenter, with the ID network in second and MSNBC third. That's in my market area in Central Florida.

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post #21 of 97
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Originally Posted by GTR View Post

 

Hell, if we ever needed any evidence that you're a paid Google shill, then there it is.

 

You may as well provide us with percentage levels of your share after this utterly ridiculous comment.

 

"Everybody is watching you, including Apple, so you may as well trust Google."

 

That 'ad-provider under the watchful eye of the FTC' has committed numerous privacy offences in the past few years alone.

 

And you're advocating we just go ahead and trust them?

 

Fark.

You.

I never said you should trust them, but good try anyway. 

 

What I did say is that doesn't make everyone else trustworthy.

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post #22 of 97
Now they've done it. Now Facebook wants to buy a phone maker. Fear of missing out: never underestimate it.

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post #23 of 97
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Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

What makes you believe they still rely on just small viewer samples like they did "back in the day", and what makes you think your viewing habits aren't being monetized?

The evidence of today's tracking is pretty easy to see. As an example, if you use either Verizon FIOS or DirectTV you can search the most-viewed shows right now, fast proof that they know what each viewer is watching at that moment. You can see your own history, proof they also keep a record of your viewership. Now couple FIOS TV/Internet info with smartphone tracking via your Verizon Wireless service (you could substitute similar services supplied by Apple iPhones/iPads and Apple TV, or the ATT/DirectTV combo) They know your address and contact numbers, when you leave for work, where you work, your income, when or whether you leave for lunch, when you get home from work, whether anyone else stays home during the day watching TV or using the internet, what time your children get home from school. . .

but you're really concerned about Google. They're only a few of the trees in the forest.

EDIT: The current most-viewed show is SportsCenter, with the ID network in second and MSNBC third. That's in my market area in Central Florida.

Still waiting for evidence to support your claims.

Your own set-top box tracks your viewing so that it can give you the 'most viewed' or 'last viewed' option. But you haven't provided any evidence that Verizon or Cox or anyone else tracks that information.

And, as I said before, even if they did, it's nowhere near as bad as Google - which has an enormous database on you and has shown a willingness to violate privacy in the past.
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post #24 of 97

And now the two most viewed shows in my area are Sportscenter (still) and a movie on TBS, Road Trip. Neither of these shows are viewed in my household, they're part of the "Hot Now" show listings on FIOS. I can also search the hot shows currently being recorded to Verizon DVR boxes. That's proof that viewers are being tracked.

 

IIRC, when we had Brighthouse they would make show recommendations based on what shows we normally watched. Now how would they know what we watched before if they didn't keep a history of my viewership? More proof.

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post #25 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

And now the two most viewed shows in my area are Sportscenter (still) and a movie on TBS, Road Trip. Neither of these shows are viewed in my household, they're part of the "Hot Now" show listings on FIOS. I can also search the hot shows currently being recorded to Verizon DVR boxes. That's proof that viewers are being tracked.

No, it isn't. They could be getting 'hot new' listings from anywhere. Nielsen ratings or number of press reviews or money spent on advertising. Still waiting for proof.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

IIRC, when we had Brighthouse they would make show recommendations based on what shows we normally watched. Now how would they know what we watched before if they didn't keep a history of my viewership? More proof.

Evidence? Even if you can show that Brighthouse DID make that claim, that's not evidence that they were tracking you. The could, for example, have logic inside the set-top box which tracks your viewing habits and selects from a range of options. For example, the set top box could be programmed to suggest 'Glee' if you watch 'American Idol'.

So where's your evidence that cable companies are tracking you? More importantly, where's your evidence that they're as bad as Google in terms of privacy violations?
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post #26 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Blatant lies. Nielsen households remain the only ones tracked.

Not true TS. Many (perhaps all) of the providers have their own in-house viewer research departments. There's also other viewer research companies being fed data by the cable and satellite companies. You may have confused official TV show viewership ratings, which are reported by Neilsen, with viewer tracking. Here's a few links.

 

This one claims to supply second-by-second viewing habits with data sent from set-top boxes.

http://www.rentrak.com/section/media/tv/scheduled_tv.html

 

and be sure to look at this one if you want an idea of just how much is personally known about you and gets combined with viewership histories. It's particularly telling, as well as disconcerting. For example they know whether anyone at a particular household uses prescription drugs and what TV shows those households watch, allowing better targeting of drug company ad dollars:

http://www.traglobal.com/tvhr/

 

And a general article on how viewers are counted, and how ratings are done. 

http://nymag.com/arts/tv/features/68805/

 

Personally I'm shocked that some of the most vocal members proclaiming we should be sore afraid of Google and only Google have no idea of the extent that companies other that Google have gone to track your movements, communications and interests. The scariest part is who's watching them, and who keeps them in line while everyone has their eyes on Google and FaceBook?


Edited by Gatorguy - 5/20/12 at 9:21am
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post #27 of 97
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Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Still waiting for evidence to support your claims.

...point, set, match

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post #28 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


Really?
I wonder why then the ad industry still relies on data based on a (relatively small) sample of households and their viewing habits to spend the $68B that they annually do. Why haven't the cable companies monetized the heck out of it!?

 

Cable companies are monetizing the heck out of it... but it takes time to shift over to new technologies.

 

TV ad targeting has become the next big thing in television advertising. Actually being able to send out different ads in real time to different viewers watching the same program.

 

All of this is in its infancy but get prepared to have ads targeted specifically to you as you watch the television. [you just went out and bought a lawnmower with your credit card and suddenly there are Lowe's ads about garden supplies appearing more often that evening.]

 

... and, yes, the cable companies do know what you are watching.


Edited by island hermit - 5/20/12 at 9:47am
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post #29 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Not true TS. Many (perhaps all) of the providers have their own in-house viewer research departments. There's also other viewer research companies being fed data by the cable and satellite companies. You may have confused official TV show viewership ratings, which are reported by Neilsen, with viewer tracking. Here's a few links.

This one claims to supply second-by-second viewing habits with data sent from set-top boxes.
http://www.rentrak.com/section/media/tv/scheduled_tv.html

"TV Essentials™ is comprehensive suite of research tools that calculates anonymous, second-by-second audience viewing patterns"

So they're not tracking personal information.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

and be sure to look at this one if you want an idea of just how much is personally known about you and gets combined with viewership histories. It's particularly telling, as well as disconcerting. For example they know whether anyone at a particular household uses prescription drugs and what TV shows those households watch, allowing better targeting of drug company ad dollars:
http://www.traglobal.com/tvhr/

Interesting that you can misquote the source so badly.

"Why it’s different: We gather tuning data from America’s largest second-by-second TV tuning database
— 2 million households — and match it with purchase and demographic data from the largest single-source household database."

and if you dig a bit further
"TRA will draw anonymous viewing data from TiVo's base"

So there's no tracking of households. Still waiting for you to provide evidence that someone is tracking your personal information.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

And a general article on how viewers are counted, and how ratings are done. 
http://nymag.com/arts/tv/features/68805/

Interesting how far off the mark this one is. It's all about Nielsen. It states that in addition to tracking viewing habits of Nielsen households, they will also be tracking your online viewing habits. But since you volunteer to be part of the Nielsen tracking system (you get paid, IIRC), it's irrelevant to your claim that cable companies are tracking your viewing habits.

So you're 0 for 3.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Personally I'm shocked that some of the most vocal members proclaiming we should be sore afraid of Google and only Google have no idea of the extent that companies other that Google have gone to track your movements, communications and interests. The scariest part is who's watching them, and who keeps them in line while everyone has their eyes on Google and FaceBook?

The difference, of course, is that Google has been caught repeatedly violating users' privacy. What evidence do you have that cable companies are doing the same thing? So far, none of your claimed citations panned out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

...point, set, match

Yep. You got skunked.
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post #30 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

Cable companies are monetizing the heck out of it... but it takes time to shift over to new technologies.

TV ad targeting has become the next big thing in television advertising. Actually being able to send out different ads in real time to different viewers watching the same program.

All of this is in its infancy but get prepared to have ads targeted specifically to you as you watch the television. [you just went out and bought a lawnmower with your credit card and suddenly there are Lowe's ads about garden supplies appearing more often that evening.]

... and, yes, the cable companies do know what you are watching.

Still waiting for the evidence.

The cable companies know in aggregate what people are watching. But every analytics firm I've seen collects the data anonymously, so there's no tracking of personal information.
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post #31 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Still waiting for the evidence.
The cable companies know in aggregate what people are watching. But every analytics firm I've seen collects the data anonymously, so there's no tracking of personal information.

 

I know that it can be done and that is good enough for me. Whatever you wish to believe is up to you. I've seen the way you argue a point and it certainly aint worth my while.

 

... and I never said anything about collecting personal information by cable companies.

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post #32 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexander Stuy View Post

WTF?  Two American companies.  Why do they bother getting Chinese approval?  Are they running it by Luxemburg also?
 

don't be a bigot, k?

post #33 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Blatant lies. Nielsen households remain the only ones tracked.

 

Not really. I think the claim that they "know when you switch channels" or what commercials you watch is unsupported, and I have no idea what kind of technology companies like Direct TV use, but by definition all Internet TV viewing/watching is tracked.

 

Any service (internet of not), that has a recently watched list, or can tell you what movies and shows you might like to see has to be tracking it's viewers watching habits merely to offer those services.  That much is obvious. 

post #34 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

Not really. I think the claim that they "know when you switch channels" or what commercials you watch is unsupported, and I have no idea what kind of technology companies like Direct TV use, but by definition all Internet TV viewing/watching is tracked.

 

Any service (internet of not), that has a recently watched list, or can tell you what movies and shows you might like to see has to be tracking it's viewers watching habits merely to offer those services.  That much is obvious. 

 

 "When you switch channels"? Hmmm... they probably could tell if they wanted to do that on an individual basis but the information they are tracking is how many people are watching what at any point in time... and therefore if there is a major shift away from a certain channel 3 minutes into a program then that can be seen and is a useful piece of data. Whether or not you changed the channel is unimportant on an individual basis.

 

I think the objections I am seeing to the idea of cable companies being able to track individual usage might stem from the belief that cable companies are using that ability to actually track individuals or that they are misusing that data in some way. Five seconds of thought, though, would tell anyone that what you watch individually on tv is not that much data... it doesn't track what you spent, where you spent it, where you are, etc. and the cable companies cannot sell this data. There isn't too much gain in knowing your individual viewing habits.

 

I'm an apartment building manager. I collect enough data on people, either tenants or prospective tenants, to easily jeopardize their personal security. What I do with that information is the important part. If I was ever found to have sold that information to another person I'd be in jail for a long long time. Regardless, I still have that information.

 

Third parties, though, are trying to find ways to access this information legally and to use this information to better target ads. How they collaborate with cable companies will be interesting to watch and, as someone mentioned, who with any authority is watching them.

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post #35 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

...

I'm an apartment building manager. I collect enough data on people, either tenants or prospective tenants, to easily jeopardize their personal security. What I do with that information is the important part. If I was ever found to have sold that information to another person I'd be in jail for a long long time. Regardless, I still have that information.

 

Third parties, though, are trying to find ways to access this information legally and to use this information to better target ads. How they collaborate with cable companies will be interesting to watch and, as someone mentioned, who with any authority is watching them.

 

Interesting thoughts, island hermit, especially the part about the legality of sharing personal information. It seems that the concern is that Google will gain one more channel to collect personal information, without taking into consideration the legal implications of such actions. What we really should be concerned is what protection the currently existing laws will provide to citizens when options for tracking increase over time, and whether efficient mechanisms exist for enforcing these laws. We need to know that legislation will protect us from individuals, companies, and the government itself, should any of those limit our liberties or threatens our integrity. If that is in place, no company, not even Google, can be a threat that we cannot deal with. If it isn't, don't kid yourself that Google will be the only one spying on you.

post #36 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

don't be a bigot, k?

I don't think that word means what you think it does.

post #37 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameronj View Post
I don't think that word means what you think it does.

 

Oh, don't worry. I'm a racist for wanting an impartial judge (redundant phrase?) in the Apple v. Samsung trial. 


Words can mean what people want them to mean.

post #38 of 97

Jr, I proved all my original claims beyond a reasonable doubt. You on the other hand went from saying I was wrong and the cable company couldn't possibly know what your're watching, to saying those-shows-they-can't-possibly-know-you're watching are only shared anonymously (it's not anonymous to the cable provider). Of course that's a made-up disagreement in the first place as no one but you was discussing how sharing was done with third-parties. The real discussion was whether your viewing habits were being tracked, which they are as proven by my links. At least in the process you've acknowledged the cable and satellite providers must be tracking your viewing habits to have anything to anonymously share with 3rd parties in the first place. 

melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #39 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

 

Well seeing as Microsoft was successful in obtaining an injunction banning the importation of Motorola Android devices into the US, Google needs other markets to sell their stuff in.

 

That was one of those under reported actions this past Friday that made me chuckle.

post #40 of 97

Does the US actually have any anti-trust laws anymore, or has auctioning Congresswhores off to the highest bidder pretty much put paid to all that?

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