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Google cleared for Motorola purchase after receiving Chinese regulatory approval - Page 2

post #41 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Blatant lies. Nielsen households remain the only ones tracked.

Then why does DirecTV offer its customers the ability to opt-out of tracking?

post #42 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

I know that it can be done and that is good enough for me. Whatever you wish to believe is up to you. I've seen the way you argue a point and it certainly aint worth my while.

... and I never said anything about collecting personal information by cable companies.

Yeah, it's not worth while arguing the way you do - all blather and no evidence. Glad you finally understood that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Jr, I proved all my original claims beyond a reasonable doubt. You on the other hand went from saying I was wrong and the cable company couldn't possibly know what your're watching, to saying those-shows-they-can't-possibly-know-you're watching are only shared anonymously (it's not anonymous to the cable provider). Of course that's a made-up disagreement in the first place as no one but you was discussing how sharing was done with third-parties. The real discussion was whether your viewing habits were being tracked, which they are as proven by my links. At least in the process you've acknowledged the cable and satellite providers must be tracking your viewing habits to have anything to anonymously share with 3rd parties in the first place. 

You didn't prove anything. All you showed is that there are research firms that provide AGGREGATE data. There is still absolutely no evidence at all that the cable company keeps your private data - and, in fact, they specifically state that they only collect anonymous data. So if you're going to continue to claim that the cable company violates your privacy, you'll need evidence.

And even if you do, there's nothing at all that supports your implication that the cable company is as big a threat to your privacy as Google.
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post #43 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbryanh View Post

Does the US actually have any anti-trust laws anymore, or has auctioning Congresswhores off to the highest bidder pretty much put paid to all that?

Congress seems to pass vague legislation and leave it up to the regulators to fill in the blanks, which they don't because they're scared of losing their cushy jobs and benefits, so the laws are effectively meaningless.

post #44 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameronj View Post

I don't think that word means what you think it does.

 

I think I learned the meaning of this word about 40 years ago, so I'm pretty certain I used it correctly.  ;)

post #45 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

You didn't prove anything. All you showed is that there are research firms that provide AGGREGATE data. There is still absolutely no evidence at all that the cable company keeps your private data - and, in fact, they specifically state that they only collect anonymous data. So if you're going to continue to claim that the cable company violates your privacy, you'll need evidence.
 

 

And I'm sure that, if legally requested, these firms would cease collecting said data, unlike Google who's been caught with their hand in the data cookie jar a little too often for comfort.*

 

* Please note that the above post may not be genuine in nature and may, in fact, have been posted, not by the username GTR, but instead by a rogue software engineer 'collecting' data on a wifi network.

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post #46 of 97
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Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


You really need to get past the 1960s.
Business is global. Apple, for example, has more than 1/2 of its business outside of the U.S. The fact that you are a U.S. company does not give you the right to violate local laws. You need to ensure compliance with countries where you do a significant amount of business.
 

Well said and prime example is the iPad 4G fiasco.... It didnt stop me from buying one but they still broke the law, in Australia anyway.


Edited by fredaroony - 5/20/12 at 2:44pm
post #47 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Oh, don't worry. I'm a racist for wanting an impartial judge (redundant phrase?) in the Apple v. Samsung trial. 


Words can mean what people want them to mean.

Correct, yes you are and since you are a Moderator it makes it even more appalling.

post #48 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

You didn't prove anything. All you showed is that there are research firms that provide AGGREGATE data. There is still absolutely no evidence at all that the cable company keeps your private data - and, in fact, they specifically state that they only collect anonymous data. So if you're going to continue to claim that the cable company violates your privacy, you'll need evidence.
And even if you do, there's nothing at all that supports your implication that the cable company is as big a threat to your privacy as Google.

 

Really? What citation are you offering for your claim the cable company only has anonymous data, not that it matters to the original argument? You're still making stuff up I think and hoping no one notices. That also extends to your new imaginary claim that I've accused the cable company of violating my privacy. On the contrary, I've no doubt I've given them permission to do a whole lot of data gathering and sharing, as have you. Read your contract along with the provider's privacy policy.

 

While the Cable Act of 1984 restricts the sharing of personally identifiable information with 3rd parties, it doesn't restrict the collection of that data by cable providers, nor keep them from using that data themselves to "better serve it's customers", nor sharing personal data if they have "permission". In addition there's questions whether phone companies who also provide TV services fall under those rules. There's no question that a company like TiVo or Hulu isn't controlled by the Cable Act.


Edited by Gatorguy - 5/20/12 at 3:32pm
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post #49 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredaroony View Post

Well said and prime example is the iPad 4G fiasco.... It didnt stop me from buying one but they still broke the law, in Australia anyway.

 

You're in Australia?

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post #50 of 97
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Originally Posted by majjo View Post

You're not being called racist for wanting an impartial judge. You're being called racist for implying that the judge in question can't be impartial based solely on her Korean heritage.

 

It seems to me he's being called a racist for wanting an impartial judge, which seems a little unusual considering that juries are selected using the exact same process.

 

I'd highly advise you guys to watch exactly who you're accusing of what on this forum.

 

Using the racism card as a weapon to attempt to win an argument is not appreciated here.

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post #51 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

 

You're in Australia?

Yep, Sydney.

post #52 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

 

It seems to me he's being called a racist for wanting an impartial judge, which seems a little unusual considering that juries are selected using the exact same process.

 

I'd highly advise you guys to watch exactly who you're accusing of what on this forum.

 

Using the racism card as a weapon to attempt to win an argument is not appreciated here.

Why? He was being racist.

post #53 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredaroony View Post

Yep, Sydney.

 

How embarrassing.

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post #54 of 97
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Originally Posted by GTR View Post

 

How embarrassing.

Yes, I agree its embarrassing for you to support a racist. 

post #55 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredaroony View Post

Why? He was being racist.

 

No, he was not.

 

It's ironic that two posters, who know very little about another's opinions or beliefs, are claiming that he's racist based upon his statement that he would like to ensure that there are impartial judges.

 

Aren't you being racist yourselves?

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post #56 of 97
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Originally Posted by fredaroony View Post

Yes, I agree its embarrassing for you to support a racist. 

 

Don't tell me. I'm racist now? (>_<)

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post #57 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

 

No, he was not.

 

It's ironic that two posters, who know very little about another's opinions or beliefs, are claiming that he's racist based upon his statement that he would like to ensure that there are impartial judges.

 

Aren't you being racist yourselves?

Only in some bizarro world logic you seem to be using.

post #58 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

 

Don't tell me. I'm racist now? (>_<)

Who knows...since you are supporting racists comments then maybe.

post #59 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by majjo View Post

 

And what is his basis for believing that Koh isn't impartial?

Exactly, that's the the whole point.

post #60 of 97

Isn't one responsibility of a moderator to be impartial--to stay out of the fray?

TS might want to moderate under a distinctly different handle from their normal one.

post #61 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Really? What citation are you offering for your claim the cable company only has anonymous data, not that it matters to the original argument? You're still making stuff up I think and hoping no one notices. That also extends to your new imaginary claim that I've accused the cable company of violating my privacy. On the contrary, I've no doubt I've given them permission to do a whole lot of data gathering and sharing, as have you. Read your contract along with the provider's privacy policy.

While the Cable Act of 1984 restricts the sharing of personally identifiable information with 3rd parties, it doesn't restrict the collection of that data by cable providers, nor keep them from using that data themselves to "better serve it's customers", nor sharing personal data if they have "permission". In addition there's questions whether phone companies who also provide TV services fall under those rules. There's no question that a company like TiVo or Hulu isn't controlled by the Cable Act.


So your inability to read matches your inability to think logically, I guess.

The citations I gave above were quotes from the links YOU provided. Each one says that they only have anonymized data.

Now, you are the one who keeps claiming that your cable company keeps track of all of your viewing habits - and you haven't provided one shred of data. The data you DID provide disproves your allegations since it specifically says that only anonymized data is available. Are you going to provide the evidence to back up your claim or are you going to keep providing evidence that agrees with me?
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

It seems to me he's being called a racist for wanting an impartial judge, which seems a little unusual considering that juries are selected using the exact same process.

He's not being called racist for wanting an impartial judge.

He's being called racist for assuming that Koh would be biased simply because some of her ancestors were born in Korea. Personally, I'm not sure that 'racist' is the right word since 'racist' implies that one race is better than another. He's simply claiming that a person will automatically side with 'their people' - which isn't necessarily something that's being applied only to one race.

In any event, it's a false assumption and the courts would not throw out a judge simply because s/he comes from the same country as one of the litigants except in very rare and extreme circumstances.
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post #62 of 97
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Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


He's not being called racist for wanting an impartial judge.
He's being called racist for assuming that Koh would be biased simply because some of her ancestors were born in Korea. Personally, I'm not sure that 'racist' is the right word since 'racist' implies that one race is better than another. He's simply claiming that a person will automatically side with 'their people' - which isn't necessarily something that's being applied only to one race.
In any event, it's a false assumption and the courts would not throw out a judge simply because s/he comes from the same country as one of the litigants except in very rare and extreme circumstances.

You might be correct, maybe bigot might have been more appropriate. 

post #63 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post

Isn't one responsibility of a moderator to be impartial--to stay out of the fray?

TS might want to moderate under a distinctly different handle from their normal one.

Indeed, not only is this poster one of the biggest trolls on this site and now clearly a bigot.

post #64 of 97

What difference dies it make if the cable box can track your viewing habits?

 

A family TV can not improve targeted ad delivery based on previous viewing history. It is not like the TV stations are going to change the ads being shown to be out of context with the programming.

 

If you watch car shows you are going to see car ads. If you watch cartoons you are going to to see kids cereal ads. You are not going to see car ads on cartoons or kids cereal ads on a car show.

 

And even if it could target ads based on family shows it would have to know who was watching otherwise it makes no sense. A TV is different from a computer because often multiple people watch a TV show together where computers are most often used by a single individual.

 

 

I don't see how the manufacturer of a cable box gains any user tracking data advantage in advertising.

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post #65 of 97
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Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


So your inability to read matches your inability to think logically, I guess.
The citations I gave above were quotes from the links YOU provided. Each one says that they only have anonymized data.
Now, you are the one who keeps claiming that your cable company keeps track of all of your viewing habits - and you haven't provided one shred of data. The data you DID provide disproves your allegations since it specifically says that only anonymized data is available. Are you going to provide the evidence to back up your claim or are you going to keep providing evidence that agrees with me?
 

Which of those links showed that the cable companies only possessed anonymous data, which doesn't affect what I claimed anyway since I've never implied they share personal data with outside companies. Answer? None of them. Your're making things up again assuming no one will read them, simply to support a claim that no one but you is making.

 

In addition none of them supported your assertion that the cable/satellite companies have no idea what you're watching. Each of my links in fact confirmed that they do, contrary to your belief. Trying to turn the discussion into who shares data with who and whether it's anonymous or identifiable doesn't make my original claim that your viewing habits are already being tracked incorrect. Your cable company knows what you are watching and when, and a lot of data can be derived from knowing that with no assist from Google needed.

 

If you were an honest poster then I wouldn't mind going out of my way to assist you in understanding. Unfortunately you're showing yourself to be a bit less than honest, hoping a few twists and turns might disguise your errors, with a few well-placed ad-homs scattered in to demonstrate your schoolyard superiority. Most readers will understand what's been linked and what it means, regardless of your attempts to confuse them. I've already wasted enough time with you since you had no intent of showing an understanding anyway..

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post #66 of 97
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Originally Posted by mstone View Post

What difference dies it make if the cable box can track your viewing habits?

 

A family TV can not improve targeted ad delivery based on previous viewing history. It is not like the TV stations are going to change the ads being shown to be out of context with the programming.

 

If you watch car shows you are going to see car ads. If you watch cartoons you are going to to see kids cereal ads. You are not going to see car ads on cartoons or kids cereal ads on a car show.

 

And even if it could target ads based on family shows it would have to know who was watching otherwise it makes no sense. A TV is different from a computer because often multiple people watch a TV show together where computers are most often used by a single individual.

 

 

I don't see how the manufacturer of a cable box gains any user tracking data advantage in advertising.

 

That's what I mentioned earlier. Even though cable operators can track individual data it does them no good unless third party data is added to the mix. Of course, at present, mixing third party data with cable operator data is illegal and, in my opinion, should remain that way.

 

As it stands, it seems that being able to track cable data is only helpful to the content providers.

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post #67 of 97
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Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Which of those links showed that the cable companies only possessed anonymous data, which doesn't affect what I claimed anyway since I've never implied they share personal data with outside companies. Answer? None of them. Your're making things up again assuming no one will read them, simply to support a claim that no one but you is making.

Let's sort this out:

1. You claimed that cable companies track your personal information just like Google. (Specifically, post #14: "Your viewing habits are being tracked now. Cable and satellite companies and yes even AppleTV already know what you're watching every minute. ") The specific claim that they know what I'm watching every minute says that you believe they can associate the shows being watched with individual users.
2. You provided a number of links allegedly proving that point.
3. I showed you that none of the links say what you claimed and every one of your links said that available information was anonymous.
4. Ergo, there is no information supporting your claim and the information you provided suggests that there is no such tracking.

Now, if you want to continue to argue that the cable companies know what you're watching every minute, it's up to you to provide data supporting that. So far, you have not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

In addition none of them supported your assertion that the cable/satellite companies have no idea what you're watching. Each of my links in fact confirmed that they do, contrary to your belief. Trying to turn the discussion into who shares data with who and whether it's anonymous or identifiable doesn't make my original claim that your viewing habits are already being tracked incorrect. Your cable company knows what you are watching and when, and a lot of data can be derived from knowing that with no assist from Google needed.

I'm still waiting for you to provide that information. The only links you provided said that data is anonymized. So, where's the data supporting your original claim (that cable and satellite companies know what you're watching every minute)?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

If you were an honest poster then I wouldn't mind going out of my way to assist you in understanding. Unfortunately you're showing yourself to be a bit less than honest, hoping a few twists and turns might disguise your errors, with a few well-placed ad-homs scattered in to demonstrate your schoolyard superiority. Most readers will understand what's been linked and what it means, regardless of your attempts to confuse them. I've already wasted enough time with you since you had no intent of showing an understanding anyway..

Funny how you seem to think that accusing others of being dishonest is going to hide the fact that you made a claim, provided evidence that did not support your claim, refused to provide evidence to support your claim, and then changed the subject to pretend that someone else is wrong. Furthermore, what ad-hominems are you talking about? I only see one ("If you were an honest poster ") and that's from you, not me.

So, where is the evidence that your cable company knows what you're watching every minute?
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post #68 of 97
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Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

That's what I mentioned earlier. Even though cable operators can track individual data it does them no good unless third party data is added to the mix. Of course, at present, mixing third party data with cable operator data is illegal and, in my opinion, should remain that way.

As it stands, it seems that being able to track cable data is only helpful to the content providers.

Still waiting for either you or gatorguy to provide evidence that the cable companies track individual viewing histories. You haven't provided a shred of evidence to back that claim and Gatorguy provided evidence that clearly refuted it.
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post #69 of 97
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Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Still waiting for either you or gatorguy to provide evidence that the cable companies track individual viewing histories. You haven't provided a shred of evidence to back that claim and Gatorguy provided evidence that clearly refuted it.


You're such a pain in the ass.

 

For example:

 

"Privacy concerns

TiVo collects detailed usage data from units via broadband Internet. As units are downloading schedule data, they transmit household viewing habits to TiVo Inc. Collected information includes a log of everything watched (time and channel) and remote keypresses such as fast forwarding through or replaying content.[23] Many users were surprised when TiVo released data on how many users rewatched the exposure of Janet Jackson's breast during the 2004 Super Bowl.[24] TiVo records usage data for their own research and they also sell it to other corporations such as advertisers.[25]Nielsen and TiVo have also previously collaborated to track viewing habits. Now TiVo has their own service.

TiVo has three levels of data collection. By default one is in "opt-out" status, where all usage data is aggregated by ZIP code and individual viewing habits are not tracked. Certain optional features and promotions require one to opt-in, where they will collect individual information for targeted show suggestions or advertising. Users can request that TiVo block the collection of anonymous viewing information and diagnostic information from their TiVo DVR."

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TiVo

 

... and since Tivo has the ability...

 

http://www.foxbusiness.com/technology/2011/03/07/tv-adopting-online-advertisers-tracking-targeting-methods/

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post #70 of 97
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Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

 

That's what I mentioned earlier. Even though cable operators can track individual data it does them no good unless third party data is added to the mix. Of course, at present, mixing third party data with cable operator data is illegal and, in my opinion, should remain that way.

 

As it stands, it seems that being able to track cable data is only helpful to the content providers.

With respect to Google tracking users to add to their database, I seriously doubt that the cable companies would 1) allow it and 2) that it would be legal. Furthermore if Google as the manufacturer of the cable box was to do anything to promote Internet delivery of content with an end run around the cable providers the cable providers would drop them in an instant as a vendor. I don't think the general public has anything to be concerned about Google owning Moto because Google's hands are tied. I don't see how they can leverage that position to take advantage of your personal viewing history or be able to up sell you anything.

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post #71 of 97
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Originally Posted by mstone View Post

With respect to Google tracking users to add to their database, I seriously doubt that the cable companies would 1) allow it and 2) that it would be legal. Furthermore if Google as the manufacturer of the cable box was to do anything to promote Internet delivery of content with an end run around the cable providers the cable providers would drop them in an instant as a vendor. I don't think the general public has anything to be concerned about Google owning Moto because Google's hands are tied. I don't see how they can leverage that position to take advantage of your personal viewing history or be able to up sell you anything.

I work for the largest cable provider in the US in the advertising division (we sell the air time to different companies large and small) and you are correct.  We are not allowed to share subscriber user data to anyone and there is NO way Google can just "add Android" to the boxes.

 

As for viewer tracking and advertising, we use Nielsen, Scarborough and Simmons (all third party data collectors who use diaries, surveys and their own separate boxes).  We don't use Rentrack because it only includes satellite subscribers and that sample tends to be too small in most markets.  Either way, we don't (and can't) just go to the service side and get user data for advertising clients.  Also, the information like previously viewed, most viewed, etc. is flushed from the box every 24-48 hours anyway.  Oh and one last thing, DVR data is also tracked via third party firms like Nielsen and is opt-in by household.

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post #72 of 97
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Originally Posted by island hermit View Post


You're such a pain in the ass.

For example:

"Privacy concerns
TiVo collects detailed usage data from units via broadband Internet. As units are downloading schedule data, they transmit household viewing habits to TiVo Inc. Collected information includes a log of everything watched (time and channel) and remote keypresses such as fast forwarding through or replaying content.[23] Many users were surprised when TiVo released data on how many users rewatched the exposure of Janet Jackson's breast during the 2004 Super Bowl.[24] TiVo records usage data for their own research and they also sell it to other corporations such as advertisers.[25]Nielsen and TiVo have also previously collaborated to track viewing habits. Now TiVo has their own service.
TiVo has three levels of data collection. By default one is in "opt-out" status, where all usage data is aggregated by ZIP code and individual viewing habits are not tracked. Certain optional features and promotions require one to opt-in, where they will collect individual information for targeted show suggestions or advertising. Users can request that TiVo block the collection of anonymous viewing information and diagnostic information from their TiVo DVR."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TiVo

... and since Tivo has the ability...

http://www.foxbusiness.com/technology/2011/03/07/tv-adopting-online-advertisers-tracking-targeting-methods/

Based on your quote I see no info being pushed back to the cable/sat provider that is attached to a TiVo. While the equipment and technology that TiVo uses could just as easily be done by cable and sat providers I have seen no evidence that they are doing this.

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post #73 of 97
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Based on your quote I see no info being pushed back to the cable/sat provider that is attached to a TiVo. While the equipment and technology that TiVo uses could just as easily be done by cable and sat providers I have seen no evidence that they are doing this.

 

My whole point is that they can do this. If you read the article you'll notice that others are doing it as well... most with an opt out option.

 

I was specifically arguing against the idea that it "can't" be done.

 

... and, yes, I should have said that the cable providers are "trying" to monetize the heck of this ability.

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post #74 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by freckledbruh View Post

Also, the information like previously viewed, most viewed, etc. is flushed from the box every 24-48 hours anyway.  Oh and one last thing, DVR data is also tracked via third party firms like Nielsen and is opt-in by household.

 

Are you talking about specific household viewer data? (even if it is anonymous)

 

[just for clarification]

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post #75 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

 

Are you talking about specific household viewer data? (even if it is anonymous)

 

[just for clarification]

Yes.  If you use the on demand feature, it will show your previously viewed shows but only for a day or so because it flushes that data out.  The only times that it keeps that data is if you "favorite" it.  I don't know about Tivo boxes and what they do with their data since that is a third party.

 

We are rolling out a product in some markets that allows the consumer to directly interact with a commercial and it will track that interaction for that particular client but that is also opt-in on the consumers' end.

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post #76 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Let's sort this out:
1. You claimed that cable companies track your personal information just like Google. (Specifically, post #14: "Your viewing habits are being tracked now. Cable and satellite companies and yes even AppleTV already know what you're watching every minute. ") The specific claim that they know what I'm watching every minute says that you believe they can associate the shows being watched with individual users.
   ... Umm, No. If I meant to write something else I would have. My claim was exactly what I wrote, not the made-up words you would rather argue against. 
2. You provided a number of links allegedly proving that point.
      Yes I did provide those links.
3. I showed you that none of the links say what you claimed and every one of your links said that available information was anonymous
      I never claimed they shared personal information, and the links proved viewing histories are collected as I wrote. You simply attempted to change the discussion to what was shared once it became apparent your assertion that the cable companies had no way of knowing what you watched was false.
4. Ergo, there is no information supporting your claim and the information you provided suggests that there is no such tracking.
     Hmm,,,3rd parties offering up to the second viewing results and with the ability to access viewing data flowing from cable, satellite and video providers matched with purchasing histories tends to show tracking isn't taking place?? Not even you would believe that.
The only links you provided said that data is anonymized.
     Yes, only anonymized info is permitted to be shared with 3rd parties,  just the same as Google, Apple, Facebook and Twitter claim. What did that have to do with my original post outside of the fact they all only share anonymous data?

The whole "anonymous data" thing is a mystery too. Would the following be considered sharable information, whether it's Google, Apple or a cable company?

 

UDID: 2b6f0cc904d137be2e1730235f5664094b831186

ZipCode: 02105

42 year old male

Occupation: Retail manager

Household Income: $78,400/yr

Credit Score: 718

Own Home: Yes

Status: Married

2 children - Female age 6 and Male age 12

Interests: Travel, Fishing

Music Preference: Jazz

 

Or perhaps simply stripping out your name and street address is enough to make the data anonymized?

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post #77 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post


You're such a pain in the ass.

For example:

"Privacy concerns
TiVo collects detailed usage data from units via broadband Internet. As units are downloading schedule data, they transmit household viewing habits to TiVo Inc. Collected information includes a log of everything watched (time and channel) and remote keypresses such as fast forwarding through or replaying content.[23] Many users were surprised when TiVo released data on how many users rewatched the exposure of Janet Jackson's breast during the 2004 Super Bowl.[24] TiVo records usage data for their own research and they also sell it to other corporations such as advertisers.[25]Nielsen and TiVo have also previously collaborated to track viewing habits. Now TiVo has their own service.
TiVo has three levels of data collection. By default one is in "opt-out" status, where all usage data is aggregated by ZIP code and individual viewing habits are not tracked. Certain optional features and promotions require one to opt-in, where they will collect individual information for targeted show suggestions or advertising. Users can request that TiVo block the collection of anonymous viewing information and diagnostic information from their TiVo DVR."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TiVo

... and since Tivo has the ability...

http://www.foxbusiness.com/technology/2011/03/07/tv-adopting-online-advertisers-tracking-targeting-methods/

OK. Your own link confirms what I've been saying all along. INDIVIDUAL VIEWING HABITS ARE NOT TRACKED.

Thanks for confirming what I've been telling you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by freckledbruh View Post

I work for the largest cable provider in the US in the advertising division (we sell the air time to different companies large and small) and you are correct.  We are not allowed to share subscriber user data to anyone and there is NO way Google can just "add Android" to the boxes.

As for viewer tracking and advertising, we use Nielsen, Scarborough and Simmons (all third party data collectors who use diaries, surveys and their own separate boxes).  We don't use Rentrack because it only includes satellite subscribers and that sample tends to be too small in most markets.  Either way, we don't (and can't) just go to the service side and get user data for advertising clients.  Also, the information like previously viewed, most viewed, etc. is flushed from the box every 24-48 hours anyway.  Oh and one last thing, DVR data is also tracked via third party firms like Nielsen and is opt-in by household.

So someone in the industry is also confirming what I've said.
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post #78 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

The whole "anonymous data" thing is a mystery too. Would the following be considered sharable information, whether it's Google, Apple or a cable company?

UDID: 2b6f0cc904d137be2e1730235f5664094b831186
ZipCode: 02105
42 year old male
Occupation: Retail manager
Household Income: $78,400/yr
Credit Score: 718
Own Home: Yes
Status: Married
2 children - Female age 6 and Male age 12
Interests: Travel, Fishing
Music Preference: Jazz

Or perhaps simply stripping out your name and street address is enough to make the data anonymized?

Probably not - since there's nothing there that allows them to tie the viewing to you as an individual. Furthermore, none of that shows what you are watching every minute as you claimed.

So when are you going to get around to posting evidence that the cable company knows what you are watching every minute as you claimed (repeatedly)?
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post #79 of 97

Anyway... I just want to point out that I was saying that the cable companies can do the exact same thing as Tivo which is to track you individually. They have that ability. I'm not arguing whether they do or not, I'm arguing that they can.

 

As proven by the statement below and by one member on the forum:

 

For example:

 

"Privacy concerns

TiVo collects detailed usage data from units via broadband Internet. As units are downloading schedule data, they transmit household viewing habits to TiVo Inc. Collected information includes a log of everything watched (time and channel) and remote keypresses such as fast forwarding through or replaying content.[23] Many users were surprised when TiVo released data on how many users rewatched the exposure of Janet Jackson's breast during the 2004 Super Bowl.[24] TiVo records usage data for their own research and they also sell it to other corporations such as advertisers.[25]Nielsen and TiVo have also previously collaborated to track viewing habits. Now TiVo has their own service.

TiVo has three levels of data collection. By default one is in "opt-out" status, where all usage data is aggregated by ZIP code and individual viewing habits are not tracked. Certain optional features and promotions require one to opt-in, where they will collect individual information for targeted show suggestions or advertising. Users can request that TiVo block the collection of anonymous viewing information and diagnostic information from their TiVo DVR."

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TiVo

 

The bold statement tells you that Tivo has the ability to track individual usage data. There are 3 modes of use now for Tivo and one of those, I believe, actually still tracks individual usage for Nielsen. By "default" you are now in opt-out mode but this was not always the case.

 

The Janet Jackson case is interesting because Tivo was actually able to see people rewinding and forwarding the "wardrobe malfunction" incident.

 

... and, yes, I have blocked Jragosta so you won't have to hear any more abut this.  ;-)


Edited by island hermit - 5/21/12 at 7:40am
Hmmmmmm...
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Hmmmmmm...
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post #80 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

Anyway... I just want to point out that I was saying that the cable companies can do the exact same thing as Tivo which is to track you individually. They have that ability. I'm not arguing whether they do or not, I'm arguing that they can.

As proven by the statement below and by one member on the forum:

For example:

"Privacy concerns
TiVo collects detailed usage data from units via broadband Internet. As units are downloading schedule data, they transmit household viewing habits to TiVo Inc. Collected information includes a log of everything watched (time and channel) and remote keypresses such as fast forwarding through or replaying content.[23] Many users were surprised when TiVo released data on how many users rewatched the exposure of Janet Jackson's breast during the 2004 Super Bowl.[24] TiVo records usage data for their own research and they also sell it to other corporations such as advertisers.[25]Nielsen and TiVo have also previously collaborated to track viewing habits. Now TiVo has their own service.
TiVo has three levels of data collection. By default one is in "opt-out" status, where all usage data is aggregated by ZIP code and individual viewing habits are not tracked. Certain optional features and promotions require one to opt-in, where they will collect individual information for targeted show suggestions or advertising. Users can request that TiVo block the collection of anonymous viewing information and diagnostic information from their TiVo DVR."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TiVo

The bold statement tells you that Tivo has the ability to track individual usage data. There are 3 modes of use now for Tivo and one of those, I believe, actually still tracks individual usage for Nielsen. By "default" you are now in opt-out mode but this was not always the case.

Only if you opt in. By default, they do not track users' information.

The entire discussion was about Gatorguy saying that the cable companies were tracking users' personal habits and knew what every one was watching every minute. He was wrong - and your own link proves that. Only those who choose to give their information to the cable company can have personal information used - just like Nielsen.
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

The Janet Jackson case is interesting because Tivo was actually able to see people rewinding and forwarding the "wardrobe malfunction" incident.

... and, yes, I have blocked Jragosta so you won't have to hear any more abut this.  ;-)

Nice job. You lose an argument so you bury your head in the sand. Way to go.
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