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Circuits in Apple's iPhone charger are 'surprisingly complex and innovative' - Page 2

post #41 of 51

I made a teardown video of this charger over a year ago and it's garnered me more hits than any other video I've ever created:

 

http://youtu.be/w6ZG8ExMV8U

 

Recently I was contacted by a blogger who specializes in these kinds of chargers and he noted how the construction was ecellent, robust, and using the finest materials. Apple has really done their dilligence with this and it's no wonder they charge $20 for it. 

 

I wonder if anyone knows how much wattage this thing can put out. Could you power a USB hard drive from it?

post #42 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by myapplelove View Post

I guess that's why they sell them at 500% margins, must be the surprisingly complex and innovative electronics. Pass the mustard please.

Grey poopon, of course.
post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by myapplelove View Post

 

Yeah you get your mustard free with your iPhone but if you lose it it's hotdog time when buy it from apple then.

 

At some point the need to be a dick overwhelms everything else and you just start making whining noises.

You can't stop it.
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post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


So you think that the low idle power consumption and efficiency magically appeared? Or does it make sense that it's due to the complexity and quality of the device?

 

Huh?  I was responding to a post that wondered why the article was even posted as "news", since we had earlier figures on performance.  I was pointing out that the article's emphasis lay elsewhere.  How on earth you manage to get to semi-beligerent on that slender opportunity is beyond me.

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post #45 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tune View Post

 

Meanwhile Samsung is getting published in Science Magazine for pioneering work on graphene transistors which have 100 times the computing power of today's silicon. But good job on the charger - atta boy Apple.

 

At some point the need to be a dick overwhelms everything else and you just start making whining noises.

You can't stop it.
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post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by philipm View Post

Apple has a long tradition of better than average power supply design (but sometimes faulty implementation). 

The one in the original Airport Base Station was awesome.  It helped me hone my soldering skills.

post #47 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobby132 View Post

 

What are you talking about?  What does the nominal voltage of a cell have to do with the cell's capacity?  A charger only charging a cell to 80% of its capacity has nothing to do with the cell's voltage.  Furthermore, a charger designed only for NiMH cells should not be used to charge alkaline cells.

 

There is no direct way to measure the actual amount of charge in a cell from the outside. However, since voltage always goes down as a cell is discharged (to varying degrees depending on the battery's chemistry), voltage level often is used as a proxy to measure remaining charge. The problem here is that non-rechargeable alkaline batteries have 1.5V at full charge, while NiMH has 1.2V at full charge. Your device can't read the labels on your batteries, and has no way of knowing whether it is a fully charged NiMH or an partially-used alkaline whose voltage has dropped to 1.2V. 

post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobby132 View Post

 

What are you talking about?  What does the nominal voltage of a cell have to do with the cell's capacity?  A charger only charging a cell to 80% of its capacity has nothing to do with the cell's voltage.  Furthermore, a charger designed only for NiMH cells should not be used to charge alkaline cells.

 

There is no direct way to measure the actual amount of charge in a cell from the outside. However, since voltage always goes down as a cell is discharged (to varying degrees depending on the battery's chemistry), voltage level often is used as a proxy to measure remaining charge. The problem here is that non-rechargeable alkaline batteries have 1.5V at full charge, while NiMH has 1.2V at full charge. Your device can't read the labels on your batteries, and has no way of knowing whether it is a fully charged NiMH or an partially-used alkaline whose voltage has dropped to 1.2V. 

post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by zogzog View Post

 

There is no direct way to measure the actual amount of charge in a cell from the outside. However, since voltage always goes down as a cell is discharged (to varying degrees depending on the battery's chemistry), voltage level often is used as a proxy to measure remaining charge. The problem here is that non-rechargeable alkaline batteries have 1.5V at full charge, while NiMH has 1.2V at full charge. Your device can't read the labels on your batteries, and has no way of knowing whether it is a fully charged NiMH or an partially-used alkaline whose voltage has dropped to 1.2V. 

 

I agree completely.  The problem is with the assertion that the cell's nominal voltage is somehow an indication of the cell's capacity; this is simply not true.

post #50 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobby132 View Post

 

I agree completely.  The problem is with the assertion that the cell's nominal voltage is somehow an indication of the cell's capacity; this is simply not true.

 

Um, sorry, but that IS true. Perhaps I didn't make myself clear enough. See this graph, for example, for alkaline batteries:

 

http://www.powerstream.com/AA-tests.htm

 

Voltage at full charge is 1.5V, and then it falls from there gradually until about 0.8V, after which there is a precipitous fall (out of charge).

 

NiMH also has a falling voltage curve, but it looks different:

 

http://www.stefanv.com/electronics/sanyo_eneloop.html

 

Start out at around 1.2V, a gentler fall than alkaline, then a big fall at the end.

 

So there is a clear correlation between voltage level and remaining capacity,

which is why a voltmeter can be used by a device to guess how much charge is remaining in its battery.

post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by zogzog View Post

 

Um, sorry, but that IS true. Perhaps I didn't make myself clear enough. See this graph, for example, for alkaline batteries:

 

http://www.powerstream.com/AA-tests.htm

 

Voltage at full charge is 1.5V, and then it falls from there gradually until about 0.8V, after which there is a precipitous fall (out of charge).

 

NiMH also has a falling voltage curve, but it looks different:

 

http://www.stefanv.com/electronics/sanyo_eneloop.html

 

Start out at around 1.2V, a gentler fall than alkaline, then a big fall at the end.

 

So there is a clear correlation between voltage level and remaining capacity,

which is why a voltmeter can be used by a device to guess how much charge is remaining in its battery.

 

You misunderstood me.  I agree there is a correlation between voltage and remaining capacity.  What I said is there is no relation between the nominal voltage of a cell and its maximum capacity, which is what an earlier post claimed.

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