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Seagate to acquire Mac storage provider LaCie for $186 million

post #1 of 38
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Mac peripheral maker LaCie announced on Wednesday that it will be acquired by hard drive maker Seagate for $186 million.

The all-cash deal is valued at 4.05 euros per share, with Seagate to acquire 64.5 percent of LaCie's outstanding shares from Philippe Spruch, the company's chairman and CEO, as well as his affiliate. The offer from Seagate values LaCie at 146 million euros, or $186 million U.S., including acquired net cash of about 49 million euros, or $65 million U.S., as of March 31, 2012.

The two companies said the acquisition will combine two highly complementary product and technology portfolios, adding LaCie's premium consumer storage solutions and network-attached storage products to Seagate's consumer storage products. Seagate sees the deal accelerating its growth strategy in the consumer storage market, particularly in Europe and Japan, as well as adding engineering and software capabilities.

"This transaction would bring a highly complementary set of capabilities to Seagate, significantly expand our consumer product offerings, add a premium-branded direct-attached storage line, strengthen our network-attached storage business line and enhance our capabilities in software development," said Steve Luczo, Seagate chairman, president and CEO.

If the deal is approved, Spruch would join Seagate and be in charge of the company's consumer storage products organization. Luczo said Seagate is excited to have Spruch, who he called "a true visionary and leader," to join their business.

LaCie


"With the proliferation of devices and content being shared and stored today, consumer demand for high-quality branded storage solutions continues to grow," Spruch said. "We are excited about the potential for this combination to benefit customers and employees by creating significant scale and opening up new markets. We look forward to making the resources of a much larger company available to our customers around the world."

LaCie has been a major supporter of Apple's Mac platform over the years, and last June was one of the first companies to unveil a Thunderbolt-based external solid-state drive. Apple launched the high-speed Thunderbolt port on its Mac lineup last year.

Last September, LaCie began shipping the first Thunderbolt hard drives priced under $1,000. The Little Big Disk can be purchased through Apple's online store, and starts at $399.95 for 1-terabyte.
post #2 of 38

The one company I trust acquires the company I trust the least.  This is not good news to me.

post #3 of 38

Good job Seagate. Now maybe LaCie will get rid of those crappy Western Digital drives they insist on using and increase their product quality.

post #4 of 38

With the new company to be named LaCiegate.  I'm actually surprised by the low selling price.

post #5 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by tikiman View Post
Now maybe LaCie will get rid of those crappy Western Digital drives they insist on using and increase their product quality.

 

So you don't want them using Seagate drives in their products, even though they're owned by Seagate?

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post #6 of 38
Argh. I have no problem with Seagate's internal drives, but I have had less than optimal results with their NAS units and externals. Kinda bad news.
post #7 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by tikiman View Post

Good job Seagate. Now maybe LaCie will get rid of those crappy Western Digital drives they insist on using and increase their product quality.

I did not know WD was crappy. I've been using Caviar Blue, Green & Blacks for several years with absolutely zero failures. I really like WD quality.

 

Like the ones in the Mac Pro

 

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/726517-REG/Apple_MC729ZM_A_1TB_SATA_Hard_Disk.html

 

Edit: I see you are from Colorado which probably explains your opinion since that is a big Seagate location


Edited by mstone - 5/23/12 at 12:27pm

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post #8 of 38

I've generally thought Seagate had less quality than other drive manufacturers.  Western Digital has always been on the top of my list for quality, particularly if you get their black drives, but they do tend to be a bit pricy.

post #9 of 38

The drives that LaCie used were not generally the problem. Their power-supplies were, which failed too often.

 

When Hitachi bought G-Tech it was a good thing. G-Tech, an enclosure-maker like LaCie, had power-supplies that failed too often too.

 

Now the G-Tech drives are buy-able again, IMHO.

 

Hopefully LaCie will inherit some technical smarts from Seagate.

 

LaCie has been around for many years, and this may again lengthen their life.

 

 

 

post #10 of 38

If I gave up on a company because I had a drive fail, there wouldn't be anybody left for me to buy a hard drive from.  I've had equal opportunity bad luck.  Conversely, I've had drives from just about every company that performed without a flaw.

post #11 of 38
Good news for mac users.
post #12 of 38

I was just about to say, I wonder if they'll call the new company LaCiegate. Haha. And I agree, the price seems surprisingly low, but maybe that's because I've become accustomed to hearing unrealistically huge numbers for tech companies.

post #13 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmgregory1 View Post

With the new company to be named LaCiegate.  I'm actually surprised by the low selling price.

 

I was just about to say, I wonder if they'll call the new company LaCiegate. Haha. And I agree, the price seems surprisingly low, but maybe that's because I've become accustomed to hearing unrealistically huge numbers for tech companies.

post #14 of 38

Buy them and take the best of them and use it then dissolve them and move on.

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post #15 of 38
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Originally Posted by im4GMG View Post

I was just about to say, I wonder if they'll call the new company LaCiegate. Haha. And I agree, the price seems surprisingly low, but maybe that's because I've become accustomed to hearing unrealistically huge numbers for tech companies.

The computer market is declining the last year or so - and many of the laptops are switching to SSDs. The volume hard drive business has a questionable future. At best, it will be stagnant.
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post #16 of 38
Most of these hard drive companies are not here for the long haul and they keep merging. It's mainly Seagate vs WD now I think. Meanwhile, Intel, Samsung, Crucial, OCZ, Micron, Kingston, Corsair, Patriot etc compete in the growth market of SSD.

The reality is, no matter if you can buy a 1TB HDD for $100 vs 100GB SSD, if you only have <100GB of data then you don't need to go with a slower drive.

The vast majority of people will have less than 256GB of data so when it hits 50c/GB, the consumer hard drive market will dry up. Sure WD and Seagate can hold on for a while as a lot of people do need tons of storage but it's all down to price.

SSD = $1/GB
HDD = 10c/GB

Then there's this:

http://hexus.net/tech/news/storage/39645-silicon-reram-spotted-track-2013/
http://www.pcgamer.com/2012/02/21/forget-ssds-here-comes-reram/

Persistent RAM. No more loading data into RAM and no more expensive RAM. 256GB RAM = 256GB of storage. Roll on 2013.
post #17 of 38

This is a really sad news. Seagate drives are the best to lose data. Too many horror Seagate drive stories by now. Noisy, heat monsters. I rather want LaCie with Hitachi inside. What a shame!!!

post #18 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


The computer market is declining the last year or so - and many of the laptops are switching to SSDs. The volume hard drive business has a questionable future. At best, it will be stagnant.

for consumer use I agree, SSD is the way it will go but with cloud storage becoming so fashionable, huge amounts of disk arrays are still needed. As personal storage become less local, it will become more cloud based. There certainly won't be any less data to store in the future. I can imagine that eventually all spinning platters will be in disk arrays in a data center.

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post #19 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Fix View Post

The one company I trust acquires the company I trust the least.  This is not good news to me.

You trust Seagate?

 

Seagate are crap. Of all the drives I've come across aside from Maxtor (which Seagate owns), Seagates fail the most. They are pathetic.

 

In 15 years of IT support the drives that have failed the most go something like this:

 

  • Maxtor
  • Seagate
  • Hitachi
  • Samsung
  • Fujitsu
  • Western Digital

 

in that order.

 

Not saying the others don't fail but they don't fail as much as the first two.

post #20 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by bedouin View Post

Argh. I have no problem with Seagate's internal drives, but I have had less than optimal results with their NAS units and externals. Kinda bad news.

There aren't a lot of external drives I trust very much. I haven't seen one by a typical hard drive brand that instilled confidence, usually I use someone else's enclosure. It costs more, but the drive brands really seem to cheap out on their enclosures, or add unnecessary gimmicks that don't work.
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

This is a really sad news. Seagate drives are the best to lose data. Too many horror Seagate drive stories by now. Noisy, heat monsters. I rather want LaCie with Hitachi inside. What a shame!!!

I've had dozens of Seagate drives and they were all quiet, cool and reliable. I don't think I've had to replace one due to a failure, overheating, noise or other undesired operation.
post #21 of 38

I certainly agree with you. This is just another case of the big fish swallowing the little fish and greed prevailing. Seagate has not made excellent drives for a long time and it's sad that Lacie took the bait.

post #22 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

The computer market is declining the last year or so - and many of the laptops are switching to SSDs. The volume hard drive business has a questionable future. At best, it will be stagnant.

I don't know if you are right but IMHO the opposite might be true. SDD's are far smaller and considerably more expensive thus requiring larger external drives. Further, our digital storage needs are expanding exponentially as we add movies, music, books magazines, podcasts, videos, photos, etc. and the backup of all of these. Cloud services are taking up some of this but are also expensive for both storage and bandwidth. I believe we are going to see an increasing need for larger and larger drives. Remember also, as we get older, have families, and live longer our personal digital library will continue to expand greatly.
post #23 of 38

Well bully for Seagate.  I switched from Seagate to Western Digital drives about 15 years ago, and have not looked back.  I have NEVER had a problem with ANY of my WD drives.  I currently have two WD My Book 2TB drives daisy chained to my iMac's firewire 800 port, a 2 TB My Book connected to my wife's iMac, and use assorted 1 TB Passport drives for off-site backups.  No problems.

post #24 of 38

Mac storage provider?

post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by zBernie View Post

Well bully for Seagate.  I switched from Seagate to Western Digital drives about 15 years ago, and have not looked back.  I have NEVER had a problem with ANY of my WD drives.  I currently have two WD My Book 2TB drives daisy chained to my iMac's firewire 800 port, a 2 TB My Book connected to my wife's iMac, and use assorted 1 TB Passport drives for off-site backups.  No problems.

15 years ago? As in 10 product generations ago?
post #26 of 38

Regardless of how many as you say "product generations" have transpired, Western Digital drives have never failed me in that time, which is the point.  Extremely reliable.  I have no reason to try a Seagate drive, regardless of how many product generations.

post #27 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by zBernie View Post

Regardless of how many as you say "product generations" have transpired, Western Digital drives have never failed me in that time, which is the point.  Extremely reliable.  I have no reason to try a Seagate drive, regardless of how many product generations.

But my point is that fifteen years is a long time. In comparison, fifteen years ago, Apple was selling fruit colored computers running on an operating system that needed to be kicked to the curb, and people had jumped ship during that era. They're a completely different company now.
post #28 of 38

LaCie owns 11.17% of Loewe. Perhaps Seagate buying LaCie somehow became a rumour of Apple buying Loewe. 

 

LaCie invests in Loewe

post #29 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

SSD = $1/GB
HDD = 10c/GB
Then there's this:
http://hexus.net/tech/news/storage/39645-silicon-reram-spotted-track-2013/
http://www.pcgamer.com/2012/02/21/forget-ssds-here-comes-reram/
Persistent RAM. No more loading data into RAM and no more expensive RAM. 256GB RAM = 256GB of storage. Roll on 2013.

Thanks for those links. I've also read about holographic storage (wiki)

To HDD's are dead. Heck, SSD's are dead to me, after I installed a SSD PCIe for OSX, Applications and my home drive. In Aperture, I'm using a managed library; don't even need the previews as the full-res photos are instant. Check this out:

http://eshop.macsales.com/item/OWC/SSDPHW2R960/

960GB, $ 2080
480GB, $ 950
240GB, $ 520
120GB, $ 358
(darn, where's the fixed width option in this new Huddler Tech crap?)

"Sustained Data Transfer Rates of up to 762MB/s read and 763MB/s write"

500
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post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Thanks for those links. I've also read about holographic storage (wiki)

Holographic comes in and out, I think it's been worked on for two to three decades, it seems to get hung up on something that prevents it from going mainstream. I think HVD was commercialized, but it was only for super high end use, and as a replacement for tape backup.
Quote:
To HDD's are dead. Heck, SSD's are dead to me, after I installed a SSD PCIe for OSX, Applications and my home drive. In Aperture, I'm using a managed library; don't even need the previews as the full-res photos are instant. Check this out:
http://eshop.macsales.com/item/OWC/SSDPHW2R960/
960GB, $ 2080
480GB, $ 950
240GB, $ 520
120GB, $ 358
(darn, where's the fixed width option in this new Huddler Tech crap?)
"Sustained Data Transfer Rates of up to 762MB/s read and 763MB/s write"
500



I've seen that before, I like dealing with OWC. If I wasn't planning to switch to an iMac, I'd consider it. My Mac Pro pumps out so much heat and it's an original model, I'm planning to get the next revision of the iMac as an upgrade on both fronts.
post #31 of 38

I understand your point.  My point is that I have never had a Western Digital drive fail me, and have no reason to even try a Seagate, regardless of their current situation.  Now maybe if they offered an inexpensive thunderbolt drive...
 

post #32 of 38
What's with all the discussion on drives? LaCie makes enclosures, that's the part a drive goes into. Their enclosures are garbage. I have seen at least a dozen fail. They fail so fast, the drives never get a chance to fail.

Seagate will dump LaCie's decent styling in favor of cheap plastic. Install their drives. And, wonder why yet another acquisition did nothing for the bottom line. At which point the suits will label it a successful defensive acquisition.
post #33 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


But my point is that fifteen years is a long time. In comparison, fifteen years ago, Apple was selling fruit colored computers running on an operating system that needed to be kicked to the curb, and people had jumped ship during that era. They're a completely different company now.

 

Reality is that Seagate were crap 15 years ago and they are crap today. NOTHING has changed since then except they seem to have got worse.

 

Western Digital have been consistently reliable drives for that 15 years now as has been ZBernie's experience as well. If that's been his experience and Seagate has given him no reason to go to them is there any reason not to continue with a brand you trust over a brand that in the past has given nothing but issues?

 

Seagate's server drives are alright but their consumer drives suck especially the Barracudas which are rebadged Maxtors which I would rather have my eyeballs ripped out my nostrils rather than use.

 

15 years is a long time to go back wards. How can a company be that bad and yet be trusted to keep their data? I'm taking the HDD out of my MacBook Pro and changing to a Western Digital now that their 1TB drives are a decent price.

post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Holographic comes in and out, I think it's been worked on for two to three decades, it seems to get hung up on something that prevents it from going mainstream. I think HVD was commercialized, but it was only for super high end use, and as a replacement for tape backup.

Interesting, that HVD (wiki). Thanks. Though still a moving part; I'd like things to be Solid State, so we can get rid of fans and noise.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I've seen that before, I like dealing with OWC. If I wasn't planning to switch to an iMac, I'd consider it. My Mac Pro pumps out so much heat and it's an original model, I'm planning to get the next revision of the iMac as an upgrade on both fronts.

I thought about an iMac as well, but couldn't stand the glossy screen so got a Mac Pro. Again. Love the fact that they keep the box looking the same, Through the years, I created a small museum of these boxes now. Agree on the noise; after installing that SSD PCIe I thought I might as well take all HDD's out, but I need the storage. NAS is of course an option which I could tuck away somewhere else, but decided to dig a hole in the wall of my study and I put the MP in the adjoining room. Silence at last.
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post #35 of 38

Hate Seagate External USB drives

Seagate drives themselves aren't too bad - but as external drives on a Mac, they have maddening problems of going to sleep, even though I don't want them too. I want the drive to spin ALL the time, because I need you ALL the time. Hate getting beachballs because of Seagates bad Mac support. Seagate drives just don't respond to OSX drive settings. Hopefully, LaCie will give them some OSX know-how and not lose their superior enclosure designs. Seagate's external drives are generally in super-cheapo enclosures that you can't take apart and upgrade the drives. I mostly use Seagates as extra internal drives in my big media PC that has many drives bays and is hooked upto my tv.

post #36 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryn Lowe View Post

Reality is that Seagate were crap 15 years ago and they are crap today. NOTHING has changed since then except they seem to have got worse.

Western Digital have been consistently reliable drives for that 15 years now as has been ZBernie's experience as well. If that's been his experience and Seagate has given him no reason to go to them is there any reason not to continue with a brand you trust over a brand that in the past has given nothing but issues?

Seagate's server drives are alright but their consumer drives suck especially the Barracudas which are rebadged Maxtors which I would rather have my eyeballs ripped out my nostrils rather than use.

15 years is a long time to go back wards. How can a company be that bad and yet be trusted to keep their data? I'm taking the HDD out of my MacBook Pro and changing to a Western Digital now that their 1TB drives are a decent price.

I don't know how our experiences on this can be so different. I've never had problems with Seagate internal drives. I switched to Seagate on the recommendation of a friend that does a lot of tech support when they switched to fluid bearings, they switched earlier than most and haven't lost a drive out of the dozen or so I've bought since then. I'm not exclusive though, but I've been happy with their performance and reliability.

I've seen problems with Seagate and WD external drives though, I don't trust either of their enclosures. The drives inside were always fine.
Edited by JeffDM - 5/25/12 at 5:54am
post #37 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM 
I don't know how our experiences on this can be so different. I've never had problems with Seagate internal drives.

Too many variables I'd guess. Different temperatures, batches, humidity, atmospheric pressure, workloads, computer models and so on will affect drive models in a variety of ways.

SSD reliability is more predictable in this regard. I've used all sorts: Seagate, Hitachi, Toshiba, WD and I haven't seen any consistent failure rate in any of them, just an odd drive failure now and then.
post #38 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

I thought about an iMac as well, but couldn't stand the glossy screen so got a Mac Pro. Again. Love the fact that they keep the box looking the same, Through the years, I created a small museum of these boxes now. Agree on the noise; after installing that SSD PCIe I thought I might as well take all HDD's out, but I need the storage. NAS is of course an option which I could tuck away somewhere else, but decided to dig a hole in the wall of my study and I put the MP in the adjoining room. Silence at last.

I'm surprised no one has started offering an anti-reflective replacement screen.

My concern with a Mac Pro was about the heat and power consumption, not the noise. With a workstation under my desk, heat billows up the edge, I'd still have to move the tower to remedy that.
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