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Apple says DoJ lawsuit 'fundamentally flawed,' could harm consumers - Page 4

post #121 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by ALNorm View Post




smh.

Your links compared paperbacks on Amazon to ebooks on iBooks. You will not find price differentiation on Big 6 ebook titles between Amazon, Apple, B&N or anyone.

eBook pricing is also included in those links, maybe you missed it, I suggest you go back and look again otherwise your post looks rather foolish.
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post #122 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by myapplelove View Post

Yeah the doj has no idea about factual basis of law, they have no case that's why 5/6 have settled. ebook prices didn't rise, and there is price differentiation and competition in book retailers amongst the prices of the six publishers currently... Now let's move on into discussing the flat earth scenario while we are being factual...

5 out of 6, so that means Random House was involved?

Obviously your ill informed opinion is not worth the screen space it takes up on this forum, why don't you do a little research BEFORE posting this drivel.

btw this may help you get some understanding of why your post is a pack of lies although it won't stop you writing congenitally stupid posts in future

http://paidcontent.org/2012/04/10/big-six-publishers-refuse-to-sign-new-contracts-with-amazon/
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post #123 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post


eBook pricing is also included in those links, maybe you missed it, I suggest you go back and look again otherwise your post looks rather foolish.

 

My post is foolish? Read your post. Oh, why don't I just quote you.

 

 

Quote:
i) Amazon is charging a slightly lower price which is less than the $9.99 they used to charge.

 

You post isn't only foolish, it is flat out wrong. The prices of those ebooks you linked are identical in both stores, just as all ebook titles from Big 6 publishers will be identical at Apple, Amazon, and every other ebook seller.

post #124 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

5 out of 6, so that means Random House was involved?
Obviously your ill informed opinion is not worth the screen space it takes up on this forum, why don't you do a little research BEFORE posting this drivel.
btw this may help you get some understanding of why your post is a pack of lies although it won't stop you writing congenitally stupid posts in future
http://paidcontent.org/2012/04/10/big-six-publishers-refuse-to-sign-new-contracts-with-amazon/
so it's 3 or 4 out of 5 that have settled, I got it up to 6 by mistake, so what? Go on and spill that bile, that's what happens when someone is put in a tight corner for having no arguments, and less than perfect manners. I am not the one however oaccusing the whole doj of no factual level in law and then going on posting flat out lies that prices are not identical.

The fact remains that ebooks prices have risen and the adoption of the agency model WITH price fixing under the collusion of apple with publishers has cost the customer who can't now go to the cheapest seller.

Yeah sure enough as the internal documents that have come to light from apple via the doj reveal apple is right to brag about an aikido move. So apple got their way, they got their guaranteed 30% cut for a little more bandwidth one iTunes store infrastructure they took away the right of their competitors to compete on price, and "the customer pays a bit more, but that's what you (the publisher) want anyway"..
Edited by myapplelove - 5/25/12 at 7:38pm
post #125 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by myapplelove View Post


so it's 3 or 4 out of 5 that have settled, I got it up to 6 by mistake, so what? Go on and spill that bile, that's what happens when someone is put in a tight corner for having no arguments, and less than perfect manners. I am not the one however oaccusing the whole doj of no factual level in law and then going on posting flat out lies that prices are not identical.
The fact remains that ebooks prices have risen and the adoption of the agency model WITH price fixing under the collusion of apple with publishers has cost the customer who can't now go to the cheapest seller.
Yeah sure enough as the internal documents that have come to light from apple via the doj reveal apple is right to brag about an aikido move. So apple got their way, they got their guaranteed 30% cut for a little more bandwidth one iTunes store infrastructure they took away the right of their competitors to compete on price, and "the customer pays a bit more, but that's what you (the publisher) want anyway"..

 

Cite a source that "eBook prices have risen" before making such a sweeping statement.

 

There has been NO evidence presented that "eBook prices have risen" barring a few select titles from a few select publishers, now before we go around in circles again a simple question:-

 

Before Apple entered the eBooks market were ALL eBook titles in the Amazon bookstore capped at $9.99?

 

If they weren't then what was the average across ALL eBooks as that is the only way to establish an unskewed, statistically relevant baseline upon which to measure a trend, i.e. did prices rise, fall or remain the same.

 

Gas prices have risen, potato prices have risen, baloney prices have risen, gold prices have risen, prices rise (and fall) it's the nature of a free market the only way to prevent market based price changes is for the Government to step in and legislate set pricing.

 

Apple does not set prices, publishers do, the DoJ has nothing on Apple with these trumped up charges.

 

Apple are well within their rights to defend themselves and that is what they are doing.

 

Hopefully when this gets to court the instigators of the complaint will be revealed and depending on who it is, Apple will also be fully within their rights to sue for obstructionist and anticompetitive behaviour.

 

You do not have to use Apples store, Apple only makes their 30% cut on iBooks from people who CHOOSE to use their store, so consumers got their way by being presented with more choice, thus it is irrelevant. (Have a headshot to your strawman).

Perhaps the DoJ should investigate why Amazon advertises different t prices on different browsers, it shows as $9.99 on an iPhone, strange that.

 

 

Fifty Shades of Grey [Kindle Edition]

E. L. James 

Digital List Price: $12.79 What's this? carrot._V192251235_.gif
Print List Price: $15.95
Kindle Price: $9.09 includes free international wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save:

$6.86 (43%)

 

 

 


Edited by hill60 - 5/25/12 at 10:06pm
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post #126 of 151

Let's not keep building this strawman and stick to the relevant case and facts.

 

 

Quote:

Cite a source that "eBook prices have risen" before making such a sweeping statement.

 

There has been NO evidence presented that "eBook prices have risen" barring a few select titles from a few select publishers, now before we go around in circles again a simple question:-

 

This case IS about an alleged collusion by SPECIFIC parties to increase the price of their titles. As such, those specific parties did indeed raise the price of certain titles. 'ALL ebooks' is a strawman because ALL ebook publishers are neither under investigation nor are they accused of raising prices. However, if you want to see a breakdown a cited breakdown of price increases by the accused publishers, I'd suggest reading the clas-action complaint, which, by the way, a judge ruled that it merited the case going forward. Since this is a legal matter, her opinion, and not yours or mine, is what matters. The complaint (PDF): http://www.hbsslaw.com/file.php?id=861&key=a579e3b8530e573aaffdb1e3eb64f994

 

That link has a comparison of price increases.

 

 

Quote:
Before Apple entered the eBooks market were ALL eBook titles in the Amazon bookstore capped at $9.99?

 

No. Only titles currently on the NYT bestseller list, then eventually the NYT complained about their list being used, so Amazon switched to using its own lists. Titles not on that list had no upper limit to their price.

 

 

Quote:
If they weren't then what was the average across ALL eBooks as that is the only way to establish an unskewed, statistically relevant baseline upon which to measure a trend, i.e. did prices rise, fall or remain the same.

 

No, it's not. To get a true measure based on what is relevant in this case--since it targets bestselling ebooks--you would need the average sale price of ebook purchases. Best-sellers are called such because they sell a lot of copies. If a best-seller increases in price, and many rarely-purchased titles decrease, thus making the average price decrease, you do not have a true indicator of overall economic conditions. Of course, none of that is relevant. The question should be, "did certain publishers collude to increase certain prices of ebooks?" Collusion to price fix does not require a minimum number of price-fixed items; only one is needed.

 

 

Quote:
Apple does not set prices, publishers do, the DoJ has nothing on Apple with these trumped up charges.

 

Unless Apple helped set a floor, which has been argued (although I've not seen hard evidence, only suggestions of such), then the claim that Apple does not set the final price may in fact be true. However, Apple setting prices is not a requirement to include them in this case. If they played a part in bringing together the actors, then this is what is called a hub and spoke conspiracy. Also, Apple does not need to actually set the prices for the charges to fall under antitrust. Even if Apple brought together the actors so they could force their terms on Amazon as a collective, this is also illegal. It is called term-fixing. http://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=1917928030443042074

 

 

Quote:
Apple are well within their rights to defend themselves and that is what they are doing.

 

Absolutely.

post #127 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by ALNorm View Post

Let's not keep building this strawman and stick to the relevant case and facts.

 

 

 

This case IS about an alleged collusion by SPECIFIC parties to increase the price of their titles. As such, those specific parties did indeed raise the price of certain titles. 'ALL ebooks' is a strawman because ALL ebook publishers are neither under investigation nor are they accused of raising prices. However, if you want to see a breakdown a cited breakdown of price increases by the accused publishers, I'd suggest reading the clas-action complaint, which, by the way, a judge ruled that it merited the case going forward. Since this is a legal matter, her opinion, and not yours or mine, is what matters. The complaint (PDF): http://www.hbsslaw.com/file.php?id=861&key=a579e3b8530e573aaffdb1e3eb64f994

 

That link has a comparison of price increases.

 

 

 

No. Only titles currently on the NYT bestseller list, then eventually the NYT complained about their list being used, so Amazon switched to using its own lists. Titles not on that list had no upper limit to their price.

 

 

 

No, it's not. To get a true measure based on what is relevant in this case--since it targets bestselling ebooks--you would need the average sale price of ebook purchases. Best-sellers are called such because they sell a lot of copies. If a best-seller increases in price, and many rarely-purchased titles decrease, thus making the average price decrease, you do not have a true indicator of overall economic conditions. Of course, none of that is relevant. The question should be, "did certain publishers collude to increase certain prices of ebooks?" Collusion to price fix does not require a minimum number of price-fixed items; only one is needed.

 

 

 

Unless Apple helped set a floor, which has been argued (although I've not seen hard evidence, only suggestions of such), then the claim that Apple does not set the final price may in fact be true. However, Apple setting prices is not a requirement to include them in this case. If they played a part in bringing together the actors, then this is what is called a hub and spoke conspiracy. Also, Apple does not need to actually set the prices for the charges to fall under antitrust. Even if Apple brought together the actors so they could force their terms on Amazon as a collective, this is also illegal. It is called term-fixing. http://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=1917928030443042074

 

 

 

Absolutely.

 

Allegations NOT proven facts.

 

I guess we'll just have to wait for the court case which will exonerate Apple as they have done nothing wrong.

 

 

 

Fifty Shades of Grey [Kindle Edition]

E. L. James 

Digital List Price: $12.79 What's this? carrot._V192251235_.gif
Print List Price: $15.95
Kindle Price: $9.09 includes free international wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: $6.86 (43%)

 
 

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
  Audible Audio Edition, Unabridged $27.51 or Free with Audible 30-day free trial
  Audio, CD, Audiobook, Unabridged $27.00  
Expand Paperback $9.57  
  Kindle Edition $9.09  

 

 

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post #128 of 151

Do you care to share the link for that price?

 

Or the browser that you used that you said made the price different? I still can't find it lower than 9.99. If Amazon is indeed selling that title lower than other retailers, those retailers get a free price match thanks to the across the board MFN clause.

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007J4T2G8/

 

It comes up for me at 9.99.

post #129 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by ALNorm View Post

Do you care to share the link for that price?

Or the browser that you used that you said made the price different? I still can't find it lower than 9.99. If Amazon is indeed selling that title lower than other retailers, those retailers get a free price match thanks to the across the board MFN clause.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007J4T2G8/


It comes up for me at 9.99.

Same for me, with a note that the priced was fixed, *coughs* set by the publisher.
post #130 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by ALNorm View Post

Do you care to share the link for that price?

Or the browser that you used that you said made the price different? I still can't find it lower than 9.99. If Amazon is indeed selling that title lower than other retailers, those retailers get a free price match thanks to the across the board MFN clause.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007J4T2G8/


It comes up for me at 9.99.

In Safari on a MacBook in Australia, a straight copy and paste.

On my iPhone the link comes up as:-

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B007J4T2G8/ref=aa_ri_kindlestore_top_1

With the $9.99 price.

It also says it's "not currently available".

However clicking "Other Editions", brings up this:-

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/kindle/other-editions/ref=kina_tdp?ie=UTF8&a=B007J4T2G8

$9.09

Curious and curiouser.
Edited by hill60 - 5/26/12 at 9:06pm
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post #131 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post


In Safari on a MacBook in Australia, a straight copy and paste.
On my iPhone the link comes up as:-
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B007J4T2G8/ref=aa_ri_kindlestore_top_1
With the $9.99 price.
It also says it's "not currently available".
However clicking "Other Editions", brings up this:-
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/kindle/other-editions/ref=kina_tdp?ie=UTF8&a=B007J4T2G8
$9.09
Curious and curiouser.

 

 

 

Fifty Shades of Grey was originally published by Writers' Coffee Shop in May 2011. It was sold under the wholesale model, which was set by Amazon. Vintage, which is an imprint of Random House, purchased the rights several months ago. That is why there are two listings for the Kindle version but one says it is not available. The 'not available' edition is the old Writers' Coffee Shop sales page. When Random House purchased the rights, a new page was created with the agency pricing at 9.99.

 

However, I still can't find the 9.09 price. Your second link shows me only a link back to the product page. I do wonder if the 9.09 price you are seeing is the last sale price before Random House purchased the rights. That would explain the "Other Editions."

post #132 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by ALNorm View Post

 

 

 

Fifty Shades of Grey was originally published by Writers' Coffee Shop in May 2011. It was sold under the wholesale model, which was set by Amazon. Vintage, which is an imprint of Random House, purchased the rights several months ago. That is why there are two listings for the Kindle version but one says it is not available. The 'not available' edition is the old Writers' Coffee Shop sales page. When Random House purchased the rights, a new page was created with the agency pricing at 9.99.

 

However, I still can't find the 9.09 price. Your second link shows me only a link back to the product page. I do wonder if the 9.09 price you are seeing is the last sale price before Random House purchased the rights. That would explain the "Other Editions."

 

On Amazon the publisher is listed as Cornerstone Digital:-

 

 

Product Details

  • File Size: 1410 KB
  • Print Length: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Cornerstone Digital (March 19, 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007L3BMGA
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled carrot._V192251235_.gif

 

http://www.amazon.com/Fifty-Shades-of-Grey-ebook/dp/B007L3BMGA/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1338107767&sr=1-1

 

On Random House's site the imprint is also listed as Cornerstone Digital

 

 

Fifty Shades of Grey

 

The book everyone is talking about. When Ana Steele meets Christian Grey ...

Available Formats

 

 

http://www.randomhouse.com.au/books/e-l-james/fifty-shades-of-grey-9780099579939.aspx

 

The Australian version is listed at $17.95

 

I guess you'll have to go back to the drawing board with your Writers Coffee shop theory, especially as the publishing dates are in 2012.

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post #133 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by ALNorm View Post



Fifty Shades of Grey was originally published by Writers' Coffee Shop in May 2011. It was sold under the wholesale model, which was set by Amazon. Vintage, which is an imprint of Random House, purchased the rights several months ago. That is why there are two listings for the Kindle version but one says it is not available. The 'not available' edition is the old Writers' Coffee Shop sales page. When Random House purchased the rights, a new page was created with the agency pricing at 9.99.

However, I still can't find the 9.09 price. Your second link shows me only a link back to the product page. I do wonder if the 9.09 price you are seeing is the last sale price before Random House purchased the rights. That would explain the "Other Editions."

Which would prove the price went up, even though random house isn't apart of the lawsuit for the 100th time..
post #134 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synergi View Post


Which would prove the price went up, even though random house isn't apart of the lawsuit for the 100th time..

 

Apart from the eBook being published by Random House as was shown in the post above yours.

 

So the price went up from $9.99 to $9.99, which shows that the price did not go up.

 

The DoJ has no case.

 

Apple will win this as they are innocent of any wrongdoing.

 

 

Fifty Shades of Grey [Kindle Edition]

E. L. James 

Digital List Price: $12.79 What's this? carrot._V192251235_.gif
Print List Price: $15.95
Kindle Price: $9.09 includes free international wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: $6.86 (43%)

 
 

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
  Audible Audio Edition, Unabridged $27.51 or Free with Audible 30-day free trial
 
  Audio, CD, Audiobook, Unabridged $27.00  
Expand Paperback $9.57  
  Kindle Edition $9.09  
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post #135 of 151
Look patience has a certain limit to it, you ve been rebuted here several times by quite a few people, and even those sympathetic to apple have told you that you haven't made any valid case in favour of apple at all. Give it a rest, and drop the discussion, you might regain some respect from other posters here eventually if you do.
post #136 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by myapplelove View Post

Look patience has a certain limit to it, you ve been rebuted here several times by quite a few people, and even those sympathetic to apple have told you that you haven't made any valid case in favour of apple at all. Give it a rest, and drop the discussion, you might regain some respect from other posters here eventually if you do.

 

I'll give it a rest when it is shown that the  "average price" of eBooks has risen as that is what the DoJ should be focussing on, I have given examples where the price has remained exactly the same, saying those examples don't count is not a rebuttal which shows anything.

 

Apple has nothing to do with eBook pricing as they do not set the price, publishers do.

 

The DoJ has NO case against Apple.

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post #137 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

I'll give it a rest when it is shown that the  "average price" of eBooks has risen as that is what the DoJ should be focussing on, I have given examples where the price has remained exactly the same, saying those examples don't count is not a rebuttal which shows anything.

Have you read the link from this post? It contains plenty of data, here's just one graph from there:

XMHby.png
 

Quote:
Apple has nothing to do with eBook pricing as they do not set the price, publishers do.

The DoJ has NO case against Apple.

I predict that you will have to eat your words when Apple settles or loses the trial.

post #138 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post


Have you read the link from this post? It contains plenty of data, here's just one graph from there:

XMHby.png
 


I predict that you will have to eat your words when Apple settles or loses the trial.

 

I predict the exact opposite, the DoJ will withdraw their witch hunt of a case before the real instigators of these trumped up charges come to light.

 

So are you advocating Government set pricing across all markets or should they just legislate the price of best selling eBook, which as I have shown are still available at the $9.99 price point.

 

Isn't that discriminatory behaviour, shouldn't the Government set prices for everything, with the DoJ making their decisions?

 

 

Once again America is proving they have the best justice money can buy, just ask any lobbyist.
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post #139 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

...

So are you advocating Government set pricing across all markets or should they just legislate the price of best selling eBook...

...

Why should I do either? Your strawman arguments are beyond ridiculous.

post #140 of 151

Without further comment, Apple's response to the DoJ, filed 5 days ago.

http://ia701206.us.archive.org/6/items/gov.uscourts.nysd.394628/gov.uscourts.nysd.394628.54.0.pdf

melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #141 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

 

I predict the exact opposite, the DoJ will withdraw their witch hunt of a case before the real instigators of these trumped up charges come to light.

 

So are you advocating Government set pricing across all markets or should they just legislate the price of best selling eBook, which as I have shown are still available at the $9.99 price point.

 

Isn't that discriminatory behaviour, shouldn't the Government set prices for everything, with the DoJ making their decisions?

 

 

Once again America is proving they have the best justice money can buy, just ask any lobbyist.

Look I love Apple like most on this board. I own and iPad, iPhone, MacBook Air and a MacBook white. But I'm also an ebook buyer and I am paying a lot more for ebooks then I use to. If you don't buy a lot of books then you won't notice. Steve Job's Bio, for instance was around 17 dollars.. if the wholesale model was still in place it would have been 9.99. A book I bought right before the agency model kicked in was 9.99 and jumped to 16.99 when the hardcover was 14.99. 

 

I don't buy nearly as many books now as I did before because of the higher prices. Its lead me to find indie titles which I am happy I've been finding good ones. I like Apple but this model they helped get going didn't do me any favors. It only helped Apple get into a position where it could compete with Amazon in ebooks. There is no competition as all the pricing is now the same..

 

These prices are ridiculous and just because you found 1 9.99 price doesn't mean much. Not to mention the 9.09 that no one else can see.

post #142 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

Why should I do either? Your strawman arguments are beyond ridiculous.

So how else do you propose that the $9.99 price limit on best selling eBooks be set, apart from legislation forcing those price limits.

Apple has done nothing wrong, at all except encourage free market behaviour.
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post #143 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synergi View Post

Look I love Apple like most on this board. I own and iPad, iPhone, MacBook Air and a MacBook white. But I'm also an ebook buyer and I am paying a lot more for ebooks then I use to. If you don't buy a lot of books then you won't notice. Steve Job's Bio, for instance was around 17 dollars.. if the wholesale model was still in place it would have been 9.99. A book I bought right before the agency model kicked in was 9.99 and jumped to 16.99 when the hardcover was 14.99. 

I don't buy nearly as many books now as I did before because of the higher prices. Its lead me to find indie titles which I am happy I've been finding good ones. I like Apple but this model they helped get going didn't do me any favors. It only helped Apple get into a position where it could compete with Amazon in ebooks. There is no competition as all the pricing is now the same..

These prices are ridiculous and just because you found 1 9.99 price doesn't mean much. Not to mention the 9.09 that no one else can see.

I found three $9.99 eBooks out of the top 5 NYT best sellers, 60% of eBooks have not risen in price.

The links are there, I copied and pasted the $9.09 price with a link, perhaps you need to disable all cookies and use an Australian proxy.

I have seen no evidence of Amazon's shady marketing message blaming prices on the agency model either.

There is nothing tying you to iBooks you can use Apps to buy from wherever you want, you can even borrow books from the library for free, it's called choice and consumers have it.
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post #144 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post


So how else do you propose that the $9.99 price limit on best selling eBooks be set, apart from legislation forcing those price limits.
Apple has done nothing wrong, at all except encourage free market behaviour.

I have never proposed that a price limit on eBooks should be set.

Repeating a lie a thousand times won't make it true.


Edited by DrDoppio - 5/28/12 at 1:08am
post #145 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

I have never proposed that a price limit on eBooks should be set.

Repeating a lie a thousand times won't make it true.

 

So there is no issue with the pricing of eBooks, then.

 

The DoJ has no case.

 

btw a screenshot from my iPhone of this link I posted before:-

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/kindle/other-editions/ref=kina_tdp?ie=UTF8&a=B007J4T2G8

 

IMG_5224.PNG

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post #146 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

 

So there is no issue with the pricing of eBooks, then.

 

The DoJ has no case.

 

Whatever... you have stopped making sense several posts ago.

post #147 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

Whatever... you have stopped making sense several posts ago.

 

The DoJ stopped making sense the moment they directed this sham of a case toward Apple.

 

You'd think they'd have more important things to waste taxpayer money on than appeasing a few whining, Internet trolls.

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post #148 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

The links are there, I copied and pasted the $9.09 price with a link, perhaps you need to disable all cookies and use an Australian proxy.
I have seen no evidence of Amazon's shady marketing message blaming prices on the agency model either.
There is nothing tying you to iBooks you can use Apps to buy from wherever you want, you can even borrow books from the library for free, it's called choice and consumers have it.

 

Steve Jobs [Kindle Edition]

Walter Isaacson 

Print List Price: $35.00
Kindle Price: $14.99 includes free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: $20.01 (57%)
Sold by: Simon and Schuster Digital Sales Inc
  This price was set by the publisher

 

 

There it is right there. Amazon letting you know that the publisher is setting that ridiculous price.  It was higher then that, it started out at 16 or 17.99.

 

That aside, Why do I want to see Australian pricing? Am I wrong or is Australia not yet mixed up in the Agency pricing as a whole but they are considering it?

 

How many Ebooks have you bought since Agency pricing kicked in? I'm trying to see what makes you qualified to tell people that do buy them that there has been no change in pricing.

 

 

Here's another.. Note the ebook price versus the other books.. Since you like to use Random House..

 

 

Sin and Syntax: How to Craft Wickedly Effective Prose [Kindle Edition]

Constance Hale 

Print List Price: $14.95
Kindle Price: $13.99 includes free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: $0.96 (6%)
Sold by: Random House Digital, Inc.
  This price was set by the publisher

 
 

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition --  
Hardcover --  
Paperback $9.44  

Edited by Synergi - 5/28/12 at 1:23pm
post #149 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synergi View Post

 

Steve Jobs [Kindle Edition]

Walter Isaacson 

Print List Price: $35.00
Kindle Price: $14.99 includes free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: $20.01 (57%)
Sold by: Simon and Schuster Digital Sales Inc
  This price was set by the publisher

 

 

There it is right there. Amazon letting you know that the publisher is setting that ridiculous price.  It was higher then that, it started out at 16 or 17.99.

 

That aside, Why do I want to see Australian pricing? Am I wrong or is Australia not yet mixed up in the Agency pricing as a whole but they are considering it?

 

How many Ebooks have you bought since Agency pricing kicked in? I'm trying to see what makes you qualified to tell people that do buy them that there has been no change in pricing.

 

Hey, it's Amazon pricing, they mess around with redirecting their links who knows where the pricing is based all I know is I block their plug ins and cookies.

 

I've provided screenshots because people claim they see different pricing in the links I provide.

 

I've also stated numerous times that the GENERAL price of eBooks has not been SHOWN to have risen aside from a few cherry picked examples.

 

America must be in really bad shape if five bucks is such a big deal for a bunch of whining cheapskates, perhaps you could sit on the street with a bowl and a piece of cardboard, "Need money for eBooks" written on it, or head down to your local library and read it for free.

 

Cry all you want but APPLE had nothing whatsoever to do with how Amazon does business with publishers, Amazon are the one's who agreed to the publishers terms when they renewed their contracts.

 

That is a normal business practice.

 

Amazon did not have to sign.

 

You do not have to buy.

 

Apple did nothing wrong.

 

 

Steve Jobs: The Exclusive Biography [Kindle Edition]

Walter Isaacson 

Print List Price: $35.00
Kindle Price: $23.50 includes applicable taxes & free international wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: $11.50 (33%)
Sold by: Hachette Book Group
  This price was set by the publisher
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post #150 of 151

At least we're now past any disagreement on whether publishers were setting some minimum prices that Amazon and other resellers could not go below. That's progress.

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post #151 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

 

Hey, it's Amazon pricing, they mess around with redirecting their links who knows where the pricing is based all I know is I block their plug ins and cookies.

 

I've also stated numerous times that the GENERAL price of eBooks has not been SHOWN to have risen aside from a few cherry picked examples.

 

America must be in really bad shape if five bucks is such a big deal for a bunch of whining cheapskates, perhaps you could sit on the street with a bowl and a piece of cardboard, "Need money for eBooks" written on it, or head down to your local library and read it for free.

 

Cry all you want but APPLE had nothing whatsoever to do with how Amazon does business with publishers, Amazon are the one's who agreed to the publishers terms when they renewed their contracts.

 

That is a normal business practice.

 

Amazon did not have to sign.

 

Apple did nothing wrong.

 

 

You do not have to buy.
 

 

You said there was no proof that Amazon showed the prices were set by publishers. I showed you that wasn't true. No comment on that?

 

You say Amazon agreed to the publishers terms. Ok and if they hadn't agreed to them? Do you think they would have had access to those books? Amazon also has customers to answer to whom they sold Kindles to. I don't see where Amazon had much of a choice but to accept.

 

America in bad shape over 5 bucks? Really? So if I'm not in bad shape, does this mean I should throw an extra five bucks at a book that I didn't have to pay before? What about when I'm buying 10 or 15 books? That 3 to 7 dollar buck price hike starts to add up.

 

Oh, and you never did answer how many books have you bought that you can say the prices haven't gone up?

 

Your right, I don't have to buy. If I want to read however I do and everyone has the same set price. There are no sales, often times the ebook is higher then its paper or hardcover counter part. 

 

I'm not sure where you get off saying Apple didn't do anything wrong. How do you know? Were you there? I wasn't. I don't think Apple needs you defending them.

 

That is what they have lawyers for.

 

I love my Apple products, the one thing I do hate is that since Apple got into this game, Ebook prices have been up. Especially when you buy on average 100 books or so a year.

 

So you tell me.. how much is a hike of 5 bucks per book on 100 books going to cost me?

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