or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Tim Cook's visit to Washington opens doors to Congress
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tim Cook's visit to Washington opens doors to Congress

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 
When Apple CEO Tim Cook visited the nation's capitol he broke Apple's unwritten rule of not mixing with politicians and met with a handful of Senate and House leaders for short introductory sit-downs.

According to aides briefed on the Capitol Hill meetings, the reason for Cook's visit was to show key policymakers that they have an open line of communication to the Apple executive, reports Fortune.

As reported on May 15, Cook met with House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) as well as Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.). House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) was on an official trip to Afghanistan at the time and couldn't meet with the Apple CEO.

The meet-and-greets were largely seen as introductions and no serious issues were mentioned, but it seems Cook's time in Washington yielded positive results with the politicos. The topics discussed were superficial at best, for example Senator McConnell reportedly spoke of how his iPad's glass, and that of the iPhone 4 and 4S, is manufactured in the Corning plant in his home state of Kentucky.

"It was an act of opening up a line of communication, but it was a first step in what hopefully will be a growing relationship," an aide said. "They didn't become best buds in one meeting."

An industry source claims that the discussions were conducted in typical Apple fashion, saying "they were quiet and focused. There was no public statement, no press conference, no hoopla, just like the company, which is focused on product design and end results." The source went on to say that Cook has a strong personal interest in government policy issues and "recognizes the role an engaged CEO can play in making a difference on those policy priorities."

Boehner and Cook
House Speaker John Boehner discusses his iPhone with Apple CEO Tim Cook. | Source: Speaker.gov


Cook may be looking to change the level of engagement Apple shares with Congress, though as it stands the company trails far behind competing tech companies in money spent on lobbying. The iPad maker put $500,000 towards political advocacy in the first quarter of 2012, while Google reportedly earmarked ten times that amount over the same period. Apple also lacks a political action committee to back lawmakers' campaign funds, something that is de rigeur for most large corporations in America.

A sign that Apple is changing the way it thinks about government in general was the company's willingness to cooperate with lawmakers over recent smartphone privacy concerns. In early March, Sen. Charles Schumer was granted a request to meet with Apple representatives over iOS apps that had the ability to upload geo-tagged photos in the background as well as data from a user's address book. In another instance, Apple responded to a letter from Reps. Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) and G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.) regarding the aforementioned contacts upload controversy with a five-page letter of its own.
post #2 of 40

I can't see any good coming from this.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #3 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

I can't see any good coming from this.

 

Well, they need to do something with their stockpiles of cash - may as well buy a government in a 2nd world country.

post #4 of 40

OMG, Steve Jobs wouldn't do that - it's the end of Apple, blah, blah, blah (insert more hyperbole)

post #5 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mode View Post

 

Well, they need to do something with their stockpiles of cash - may as well buy a government in a 2nd world country.

 

I have a recommendation for Apple and their cash... keep it out of the pockets of the politicians.

 

On a related note, did Steve Jobs ever appear before lawmakers?

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #6 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

 

I have a recommendation for Apple and their cash... keep it out of the pockets of the politicians.

 

On a related note, did Steve Jobs ever appear before lawmakers?

Actually, to quote from OpenSecret.org, ". Apple's appetite for lobbying has steadily increased during the past 10 years, going from spending $180,000 in 1998 to a peak of $1.7 million in 2008."

 

http://www.opensecrets.org/news/2011/01/capital-rivals-apple-versus-microso.html

post #7 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

I can't see any good coming from this.

 

Microsoft used to eschew formal meetings with Congressional leaders, as well as lobbying. That all changed once they got hit with an anti-trust lawsuit. While Apple isn't nearly in the same situation Microsoft was in, they are increasingly under scrutiny for certain business practices. Having an open line to Washington might help diffuse potentially difficult political situations.
post #8 of 40

below...

post #9 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by markbyrn View Post

OMG, Steve Jobs wouldn't do that - it's the end of Apple, blah, blah, blah (insert more hyperbole)

Apple ended the moment Jobs died.

post #10 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

... as it stands the company trails far behind competing tech companies in money spent on lobbying. The iPad maker put $500,000 towards political advocacy in the first quarter of 2012, while Google reportedly earmarked ten times that amount over the same period. Apple also lacks a political action committee to back lawmakers' campaign funds, something that is de rigeur for most large corporations in America. ...

 

This is uniformly *bad* news.  

Engaging in such bribery and influence peddling is corruption by definition and part of what's wrong with politics in the USA.  

 

A nominal 500,000 for "advocacy is understandable, but if they are seriously going to get into the game, then they are just as corrupt as all the rest.  We can only hope that Cook was seriously about opening up communication and that it isn't (as the article implies), the beginning of Apple jumping on the corrupt bandwagon of lobbying.  

post #11 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by KPOM View Post

 

Microsoft used to eschew formal meetings with Congressional leaders, as well as lobbying. That all changed once they got hit with an anti-trust lawsuit. While Apple isn't nearly in the same situation Microsoft was in, they are increasingly under scrutiny for certain business practices. Having an open line to Washington might help diffuse potentially difficult political situations.

 

There is a big difference between "what will help them out" and "what's the right thing to do."

post #12 of 40
Gosh, Apple is starting to sleep with the fishes. The winner of those two is the politicians. Now, the richest corporation in America come crawling to Washington with sack-loads of money in non-disclosed meetings. Open communication, eh? More like you want this law vanish, this advantage, then give me some..
post #13 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

 

I have a recommendation for Apple and their cash... keep it out of the pockets of the politicians.

 

On a related note, did Steve Jobs ever appear before lawmakers?

If you consider POTUS as a lawmaker then, yes!

bb
Reply
bb
Reply
post #14 of 40

Apple could really have some power if they would just manufacture all of their products throughout the USA. They could do as the military manufacturers do and put some type of plant in every state. Then no politician would want to cross Apple for fear of having their manufacturing plant move to another state. It is this tactic that keeps the military manufacturers so strong in congress.

 

The USA doesn't need a giant army and navy but we've got them because of so many bases in all of the states. No congressman wants to have a base closed in his state because that means jobs will disappear. I live in Montana. Only Alaska has fewer people per square mile. Montana has nuclear missiles, several air bases, and National Guard bases. I don't think the Canadians are about to attack us any time soon.
 

post #15 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

I can't see any good coming from this.

 

I agree. I hope this is not a sign of Apple crony capitalism. My best hope is Apple's just trying to be friendly to keep these assholes off their back.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply
post #16 of 40

POTUS is not a lawmaker. Congress introduces bills, which may eventually become laws... Did you forget your "Schoolhouse Rock"?

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #17 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

 

My best hope is Apple's just trying to be friendly to keep these assholes off their back.

 

Obviously not an easy task.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #18 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post

 Montana has nuclear missiles, several air bases, and National Guard bases. I don't think the Canadians are about to attack us any time soon.

 

We all know how the missiles and air bases came into being. During the cold war, any potential attack on or by the Soviets would have been launched over the Arctic as that is the shortest distance to the targets. The Canadians have always been quite cooperative in that defense effort.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #19 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post

Montana has nuclear missiles, several air bases, and National Guard bases. I don't think the Canadians are about to attack us any time soon.

 

Why would Canada want to attack you anytime soon? Canada is waaay ahead of ya :)

post #20 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by CGJ View Post

Why would Canada want to attack you anytime soon? Canada is waaay ahead of ya :)

I don't see why Canada would want to attack the United States. A large number of Canadians have US ancestors and still remember why they left the US. Why would they want this place? 

 

We face a greater danger from Liechtenstein.

post #21 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post

Apple could really have some power if they would just manufacture all of their products throughout the USA. They could do as the military manufacturers do and put some type of plant in every state. Then no politician would want to cross Apple for fear of having their manufacturing plant move to another state. It is this tactic that keeps the military manufacturers so strong in congress.

 

What US government-related disadvantage does Apple face currently?

post #22 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

POTUS is not a lawmaker. Congress introduces bills, which may eventually become laws... Did you forget your "Schoolhouse Rock"?

 

How is a bill made into law?
post #23 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

I can't see any good coming from this.

Why? He's not giving Apple money to campaigns etc.

He went to basically say 'you got a question about Apple, how about you ask me before go out to the press nd bash us for crap we might not be doing'. Such as the location brouhaha, the privacy policy stuff etc.

Given the hits Apple took in the media and stock value, it's a wise move. One Steve might have made at this point also

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #24 of 40
This is a HUGE mistake... Cook has opened the Apple front doors to all levels of political manipulation you can imagine...... Bad move.
post #25 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Law Talkin' Guy View Post

 

How is a bill made into law?

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #26 of 40

I think you may be the first to embed a video in our new system. Congrats!

 

Hope it's not abused… lol.gif

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #27 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

There is a big difference between "what will help them out" and "what's the right thing to do."

 

At the end of the day, their competitors are all on K Street. They need to be there, too. Doing the right thing is good, but sometimes isn't enough, unfortunately. Apple isn't the largest PC maker by any stretch, nor are they the largest phone manufacturer, eBook seller, or media company. Yet they are under the kind of government scrutiny that would be expected if they held monopolies in all those markets. They need to defend themselves against legal action.

post #28 of 40
While I don't personally like that Apple is going this direction, it seems like a pretty overt play at trying to push the corporate tax holiday through so that they can bring all of that cash home. Curved glass ain't cheap, and there is a lot of it in that spaceship campus they're building.
post #29 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

POTUS is not a lawmaker.

He seems to think he is, every time he destroys another piece of the Constitution with an illegal executive order.
post #30 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider 
When Apple CEO Tim Cook visited the nation's capitol he broke Apple's unwritten rule of not mixing with politicians

Isn't there also a rule about wearing a suit and owning a suit? He should have turned up in his cycling spandex, that's the Apple way.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider 
Cook may be looking to change the level of engagement Apple shares with Congress

While on the face of it, this seems to be a bad move, the bigger Apple has become, the more they need legislation to do what they want just like any other company. This includes legislation about taxes, workers' rights (Western workers), privacy issues, anti-competitive measures, environmental issues and a whole bunch of other things. Lobbying is a corrupt way to win favourable legislation and it's not ok just because everyone else does it but the system has been designed in such a way that it's how it is done.
post #31 of 40

Open communication is never a bad thing. I just hope Apple doesn't start giving ever larger sums to politicians. It's just a gut check, but it makes me want to take a shower.

 

Steve Jobs wasn't perfect, but I always liked that he wore his jeans and sneakers and black shirts at nearly every occasion. I hate seeing Cook in a suit, trying to blend in.

post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by bugsnw View Post

Open communication is never a bad thing. I just hope Apple doesn't start giving ever larger sums to politicians. It's just a gut check, but it makes me want to take a shower.

Steve Jobs wasn't perfect, but I always liked that he wore his jeans and sneakers and black shirts at nearly every occasion. I hate seeing Cook in a suit, trying to blend in.

Give the man a break, and quit pining. Cook will look foolish if he tried to imitate Jobs. He is who he is.
post #33 of 40

Boehner's one term Speakership is about to be over. He has no control whatsoever of Congress. He's been the weakest Speaker in modern times.

post #34 of 40
This entire thread (present comment excepted) has been an exercise in intellectual wankery.

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply
post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibitzer View Post
This entire thread (present comment excepted) has been an exercise in intellectual wankery.

 

That's a discredit to the word 'intellectual'. It has been political wankery. lol.gif

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

 

I have a recommendation for Apple and their cash... keep it out of the pockets of the politicians.

 

On a related note, did Steve Jobs ever appear before lawmakers?

 

Long ago and far away... Jobs appeared before the House, where they have nameplates like "H. Waxman, Rep. California" -- a staunch democrat.

 

Steve referred to him as Mr. Republican...

 

True story!

 

 

Also, around that time, Woz was supporting Sen. Gary Hart (Dem CO) for president on his campaign against unemployment.  Woz told everybody that Hart was good Jobs.

 

Also, True story!

"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

I can't see any good coming from this.

Agree. Makes me nervous when Tim starts tinkering with the recipe for Steve's "secret sauce."
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
post #38 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

That's a discredit to the word 'intellectual'. It has been political wankery. lol.gif

Yup. You're right.

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply
post #39 of 40

So Jobs would never have associated with political leaders, right?

 

Riiiight ...

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/moslive/article-1386409/Worlds-richest-dinner-party--including-guests-Obama-Mark-Zuckerberg.html

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply
post #40 of 40

What kind of joke is this?  Al Gore is a politician, even if still not in office -- a very slippery snake oil salesman at that!  Ever heard of the "global warming" farce?!

 

Why Won't Al Gore Debate? | Heartland Institute

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Tim Cook's visit to Washington opens doors to Congress