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Tim Cook wanted to join Apple 5 minutes into interview with Steve Jobs

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 
Apple boss Tim Cook revealed on Tuesday that he was ready to jump ship from Compaq to Apple just five minutes into his 1998 interview with late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs.

During the question and answer period of an on-stage interview at the D10 conference in southern California, Cook recounted the reasons behind his decision to join Apple almost 15 years ago.

Cook said he had been getting repeated calls in 1998 from an executive search firm hired by Jobs to find an operations executive. After saying no multiple times, Cook finally caved and agreed to an interview, taking a red-eye flight on Friday for an interview on Saturday morning.

"It was a very interesting meeting," Cook said of the interview, adding that he was surprised to find that he wanted to join Apple after just five minutes.

Cook pointed to three things that prompted the decision. He said he recognized the brilliance of Jobs' vision for the iMac as being different from "following the herd." He was also impressed by Apple's strategy to target the consumer market, which contrasted with competitors' plans to move toward the enterprise. Finally, Jobs struck Cook as someone who was unaffected by money, a trait that he strongly admired.

Tim Cook at D10


Those factors combined to lead Cook to "throw caution to the wind." He went back to Compaq and resigned immediately.

Another selling point that drew Cook to Apple was the loyalty of its customer base. Unlike Compaq customers, Apple customers would get mad at Apple but keep buying from the company. "An Apple customer was a unique breed," he said, adding that they had a level of emotion that isn't usually seen in the technology industry.



Even early on, Cook saw the value that his contribution could add to Apple. "When I looked at the balance sheet of the company, I thought I could do something in turning around a great American company," Cook reportedly said.

As chief operations officer at Apple, Cook came to be known as one of the world's most brilliant operations executives. Cook, Jobs and the rest of the team at Apple went on to stage an impressive comeback that took the company from the verge of bankruptcy to the world's most valuable company. Cook was trusted with the daily operations at Apple during Jobs' medical leaves and was eventually given the role of CEO last August.

Visit AppleInsider's D10 archive for more of Cook's comments and ongoing coverage of the conference.
post #2 of 37
That was such a waste of time. If Cook's going to keep the ship in full gear, he's gotta learn that if he's going to do these PR stunts, he'd better have some chum for the water. That's how Jobs got the momentum, he knew how to use the press for his advantage. I don't see any top level innovation from him, nor do I think he's capable of keeping Apple's name in the headlines for very long. Don't lie to yourselves, you know you agree: Cook wasn't Jobs' ideal candidate for replacement.
post #3 of 37

I don't agree.  Think about it for a moment.  Not only did Jobs recruit Cook, he also entrusted him with Apple when his health was failing.  Steve Jobs was wise enough to know that when he had a resurgence of what looked like good health a few years back, it wouldn't last.  He didn't go on a search for a successor - because he already had one (and possibly another in waiting years from now).

 

Tim Cook is no Steve Jobs, nor was Steve Jobs a Tim Cook.  Everyone has his or her own strengths and weaknesses.

 

Were you expecting Cook to reveal plans for Apple TV tonight?  Of course he couldn't do that.  Jobs wouldn't have either.  If you got fooled into thinking something big was going to happen tonight, you've got no one but yourself to blame.

 

The real test of post-Steve Jobs leadership will come a decade from now.

post #4 of 37
You're very optimistic and I wish I could be too. But the thing that set Apple apart is their marketing. I'm an Apple fan too but I'll be honest, their stuff isn't materially better than anyone else. It's all about selling us into the anticipation. The purchase, inboxing, and the look and feel of the product.
...
People think Apple's products last longer than competitors. I'll give it them that apple product are built very well, but they're not infallible. Customers take more pride in these products and take better care of them. And even a Windows PC works great with the right hardware and care.
...
But my point is that Cook isn't what Apple is. He's a nice guy and a strong manager. He's not a face of American innovation. My only hope is that he keeps Ive awake at his desk or I give this company 5 years before they're back to what they were in the 90's
post #5 of 37
Sorry for the grammatical errors in my last post. It was typed on a smartphone (Phone) which likes to change/delete my words without warning or notification. I wish they'd fix that.
post #6 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

But my point is that Cook isn't what Apple is. He's a nice guy and a strong manager. He's not a face of American innovation. My only hope is that he keeps Ive awake at his desk or I give this company 5 years before they're back to what they were in the 90's

 

For someone you claim isn't what Apple is, Cook has played a very significant role in turning around the fortunes of the company working alongside Steve Jobs. I don't think it matters much that Cook isn't a product visionary in his role as CEO. What matters is he understands the corporate culture that has made the company so very successful. As long as he doesn't stifle innovation by putting cost control above the work Ive and others want to do in bringing new products to market, Apple will do just fine with Cook at the helm.

 

I'd be much more concerned if Apple had bought in a complete outsider with the same skills as Cook. This would have me fearing a possible return to the bad old days of Apple. But since Cook has worked closely with the key figures within Apple for so long, and surely trusts them, I think it's quite unlikely he's going to make too many bad decisions that result in bad products for consumers.

post #7 of 37
The company was founded around helping a visionary achieve his goals. I'm simply calling Cook's bluff. He's riding on what Jobs left in the pipeline as long as possible. He would've used tonight, his first public interview, as a staple to show he's boss and he has a plan.
...
Not only does he NOT have a plan, he can't even answer a question like a human being. He skirted everything off with generic garbage. Even when Walt cornered him on the Facebook issue and said "that's not what Steve said". Cool was only prepared to deflect questions and keep with the "we have exciting plans" rhetoric.
...
No, Tim, you use these opportunities to keep things going. Not waste everyone's time. He knew the questions that were gonna be asked. Nothing substantial reported. I don't even know why he agreed to attend. Waste of time.
post #8 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

The company was founded around helping a visionary achieve his goals. I'm simply calling Cook's bluff. He's riding on what Jobs left in the pipeline as long as possible. He would've used tonight, his first public interview, as a staple to show he's boss and he has a plan.
...
Not only does he NOT have a plan, he can't even answer a question like a human being. He skirted everything off with generic garbage. Even when Walt cornered him on the Facebook issue and said "that's not what Steve said". Cool was only prepared to deflect questions and keep with the "we have exciting plans" rhetoric.
...
No, Tim, you use these opportunities to keep things going. Not waste everyone's time. He knew the questions that were gonna be asked. Nothing substantial reported. I don't even know why he agreed to attend. Waste of time.

So he answered questions about future plans and private negotiations exactly like Jobs has answered them at every such interview and you claim this is proof that Cook doesn't a have a fraking clue what he's doing?

it's absolutely amazing that no matter what Apple does people like you always claim they are on the brink of failure. Next year you'll be claiming that Cook just got lucky the way Jobs was lucky with the iPod, IPhone and IPad. You'll claim that Jobs, who you probably didn't think deserved his position until after he died, built so well that an rudderless idiot like Cook can even run Apple but that it won't last soon, Apple will fail soooooon.

If only you had a clue about Apple, Jobs, and what Cook has done to make Apple great over the last 15 years.

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post #9 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

The company was founded around helping a visionary achieve his goals. I'm simply calling Cook's bluff. He's riding on what Jobs left in the pipeline as long as possible. He would've used tonight, his first public interview, as a staple to show he's boss and he has a plan.
...
Not only does he NOT have a plan, he can't even answer a question like a human being. He skirted everything off with generic garbage. Even when Walt cornered him on the Facebook issue and said "that's not what Steve said". Cool was only prepared to deflect questions and keep with the "we have exciting plans" rhetoric.
...
No, Tim, you use these opportunities to keep things going. Not waste everyone's time. He knew the questions that were gonna be asked. Nothing substantial reported. I don't even know why he agreed to attend. Waste of time.

 

God, you're either an idiot, a troll, incredibly naive, or all 3.

 

Please, tell me what kind of responses you were expecting. The conclusions you're drawing from this interview are so unbelievably assinine. You can tell Cook does 'NOT have a plan' from that? Really? That's incredible. Why is that? Because he didn't spell out his plan for you, the world, and the competition? I recall Steve being in that chair, and he skirted more than Cook did, not revealing a single iota about what Apple might or might not do. Unlike you, Cook understands that this is not the proper avenue to talk about Apple's roadmap, and the fact that you expected/wanting him to shows how little you really understand about the company and whats best for it.  Stop pretending like you can read the guy, or that you have any clue what you're talking about. Cook has been a driving force in Apple's turnaround and success for a very long time. He's not some dipshit that just joined the company. He understand its DNA much better than you ever will. And about that plan, I hear there's an Apple keynote less than 2 weeks from now. But since Cook doesn't have a plan, I expect Apple's execs to do some stand-up comedy, or maybe tell us some knock-knock jokes. 


Edited by Slurpy - 5/29/12 at 10:42pm
post #10 of 37
Wtg, throwing insults really gives you credibility.
...
This was Cook's FIRST public conference. This was his chance to make an impression that he had the wheel. Jobs could get away with it because he already established who he was. Cook hasn't. And this was his his best chance.
...
What did you get out of it? Nothing. He said absolutely nothing. He wasted an hour bringing nothing to the table. Get over yourselves, that's what you're going to get no matter how much you deny it. He was a big part of Apple's turnaround doing admin stuff under Jobs. He's not what made the company great, he was simply a helper.
post #11 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

 ,,, But the thing that set Apple apart is their marketing ...

 

Many people believe this, but I think they're wrong.  While Apple's marketing is excellent, I think it's their product quality that most distinguishes them.  It's OK for you to have your own opinion, but you ought to state it as opinion.  I think you're in a minority on this site.

post #12 of 37
After my 2010 MBP's logic board went out on me after just a little over year, I don't have faith in their quality.

Same with OS X Lion. I didn't even know what the pinwheel looked like til I upgraded (8GB of ram btw). Now try using iPhoto at the same time as anything else.

Same with ios 5.0.1. The so-called battery life fixer that actually caused me to replace the phone (which it did, just a defective phone).

Safari? I'm sure I'm not in the minority when I say I use Chrome exclusively now.

Granted its still way better to use than the competition, but overall quality? Nah. Apple's as susceptible to failure as everything else. (except I've never had something as devastating as a board problem on a windows PC ever, let alone just a little over a year old)

But their products are still shiny and easy to use so I'll keep throwing money at them. Waiting to smell the new box scent with every purchase. I'm a sucker. But that's about the only thrill I get from actually using the products anymore. Waiting for a worthy alternative.
post #13 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

Granted its still way better to use than the competition, but overall quality? Nah. Apple's as susceptible to failure as everything else. (except I've never had something as devastating as a board problem on a windows PC ever, let alone just a little over a year old)

This sums up the crap your stating. You take the term better overall quality and then contort that in your mind to mean that it means people are saying Apple, a company that builds physical items in this universe, isn't susceptible to failures. You started off without any credibility and have reenforced your anti-Apple position repeatedly. Well done¡

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

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post #14 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

You're very optimistic and I wish I could be too. But the thing that set Apple apart is their marketing. I'm an Apple fan too but I'll be honest, their stuff isn't materially better than anyone else. It's all about selling us into the anticipation. The purchase, inboxing, and the look and feel of the product.
...
People think Apple's products last longer than competitors. I'll give it them that apple product are built very well, but they're not infallible. Customers take more pride in these products and take better care of them. And even a Windows PC works great with the right hardware and care.
...
But my point is that Cook isn't what Apple is. He's a nice guy and a strong manager. He's not a face of American innovation. My only hope is that he keeps Ive awake at his desk or I give this company 5 years before they're back to what they were in the 90's


No amount of marketing will sell a junk product. Junk is junk no matter how well you market them. Marketing helps, but ultimately it's the user experience and satisfaction that keeps them coming back for more.

post #15 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


So he answered questions about future plans and private negotiations exactly like Jobs has answered them at every such interview and you claim this is proof that Cook doesn't a have a fraking clue what he's doing?
it's absolutely amazing that no matter what Apple does people like you always claim they are on the brink of failure. Next year you'll be claiming that Cook just got lucky the way Jobs was lucky with the iPod, IPhone and IPad. You'll claim that Jobs, who you probably didn't think deserved his position until after he died, built so well that an rudderless idiot like Cook can even run Apple but that it won't last soon, Apple will fail soooooon.
If only you had a clue about Apple, Jobs, and what Cook has done to make Apple great over the last 15 years.

 

Some people have  a tendency to panic in the face of change. There's not much you can do about that unfortunately. I was pretty pleased with a lot of the stuff he said, and didn't say:

 

  • 'Doubling down' on secrecy. Good. I also wondered if this was a hint concerning all those iPhone leaks.
  • Not getting into content production. Good. If they did that would show an alarming lack of focus
  • Not interested in becoming a mobile/internet/whatever service provider. Mostly good, I think. Though I'm a bit worried how the mobile outfits are going to handle the increasing demands from companies like Apple and Microsoft. I mean, they're winging about devices being too 'heavy' now. What do they think they're going to be like in the future.
  • Focussing on products. Products is what they do. Glad to hear it. They don't have to be everything to everybody, but they do want to make the best products they can.
post #16 of 37

AjbDtc826 You're a troll. It has been less then a year since Steve Jobs, may he rest in peace, passed away. Do you really expect *anyone* to step into his shoes and start innovating *immediately*? No, it takes time. If you make rash of things and start coming out what with products you think are innovative right off the bat, you will fail.

 

I see Tim Cook taking it slow, trusting his peers and slowly adopting the position of who was one of the greatest innovators or our lifetime. Calm down and give the man some time.

post #17 of 37

Organizations are like people - they grow, they morph, and they die. We have to understand this basic principle. Is Cook the right guy to run Apple? Only time will tell. However, there is one thing pretty much no one looks at - would Jobs have been the right guy to run Apple today?

 

One strong Jobs trait was to only consider businesses where Apple could make its usual 35% margins, and not look at anything else. I imagine if Jobs had been running the show, the new iPad might have been priced a lot higher, and the Apple TV might have costed a lot more than $99. When you have $100B in the bank, your thinking about profitability has to change. If Apple has to double its revenues from here, it cannot operate as a niche company anymore. It has to think and behave like a mainstream player.

 

For the first time, Apple under Cook has initiated business models where it is willing to lose money today to create an advantage for itself in the future. iCloud was the first Apple service where Apple actually loses money on the service, but makes it up because it makes the devices attractive. Its earlier offering of Mobile Me was a pricey service - iTunes was structured to break even/make small amounts of money. It is probably not a coincidence that iCloud announcement came literally the day Jobs died. This is the sort of thing that was a total anathema to Jobs.

 

There will be several occasions in the near future, where Apple will have to consider business models where it might lose a little money upfront. For instance, if Apple wants to offer a subscription model for TV content, existing stakeholders will not allow them to do this easy. Apple might be forced to start doing this by losing money upfront, in the hope of cracking open the market. Apple's two strongest competitors, Amazon and Google have shown the willingness to lose money upfront to increase marketshare. Apple will have to do likewise, otherwise they run the risk that Amazon/Google will be able to have a free hand in establishing a dominant presence in some vital markets.

 

 

There is one reason why I think Cook is the right man to run Apple. Jobs had an amazing record of successes in terms of launching innovative products. However, obviously this cannot go on forever - and when Jobs isn't around, it is quite unlikely that anyone else could have a similar record. Even assuming or expecting someone to live up to Jobs record is asking for too much. Under these circumstances, Apple is much better off leveraging its existing product portfolio and maximizing the opportunity it has with its current products. Of course, I am sure Jobs must have initiated a pipeline of products and features that should keep Apple ahead for the next couple of years - but Apple is still better off maximizing its current opportunity while executing Steve Jobs final plans. Being a logistics whiz, I do not think there is a better person than Tim Cook to maximize the current opportunity. Just look at how well the launch of the new iPad was handled, and how the waiting time was minimized quickly.

 

At some point, Apple's advantage will be so big, that even without Steve Jobs Apple will have an insurmountable edge. Apple already has the resources to invest in so many areas that its competition just cannot even afford to think of. Whether it is battery chemistry, materials, manufacturing processes, semiconductors, user interface innovation, Apple has invested enormous amounts of capital very intelligently to create a sustainable edge for itself for a long time. They have prepaid for components to guarantee supply at low prices, even in the face of shortages. As the money in the bank grows, these efforts will only become bigger.

 

Finally, the things that made Apple successful - innovation, customer focus, simplicity, good design, etc, are in the DNA of the company. With or without Steve Jobs, these things will not change, at least till the current crop of employees and management is around.

post #18 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Feynman View Post


Learn what a troll is kid, I backed my opinions and claims up.

And this isn't the time to coast on what was gifted to him in the heat of competition emerging in these new markets that Apple started: smartphone and tablet. There's very little differentiating themselves from the competition anymore besides brand loyalty. And if it turns into a spec war again, there's going to be some really bad days ahead.

But hey, I hope I'm wrong. Let's see what the next iPhone has that's exciting and never seen before. My $'s on nothing except LTE and bumped specs.
post #19 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

That was such a waste of time. If Cook's going to keep the ship in full gear, he's gotta learn that if he's going to do these PR stunts, he'd better have some chum for the water. That's how Jobs got the momentum, he knew how to use the press for his advantage. I don't see any top level innovation from him, nor do I think he's capable of keeping Apple's name in the headlines for very long. Don't lie to yourselves, you know you agree: Cook wasn't Jobs' ideal candidate for replacement.








Judging by your "what would Jobs do" post I'd say you're having a tough time letting go. All the things he did, could have done, would have done... write it all on a balloon and just let it go.
Let what he did just stand for itself. And we'll just see what kind of company he built as time goes on.
It's also kind of ghoulish.
post #20 of 37

Whenever I someone makes a claim like this I check my wintel products and go to a bestbuy or staples and check out the current crop of android devices. Here it is in a nutshell:

 

PC hardware: Mea Culpa and mostly made clunkily. I have owned Acers, Dells, HP, Sony, Toshiba and now Asus.

 

Android Hardware: Same as above, although I have yet to bring myself to purchase one. Thanks to Samsung's idiotic ad tactics, this is no longer a consideration.

 

Windows (any flavor): MS is hellbent on creating a lower than mediocre product because this is how they perceive their customers. After years of using Windows, the ugly interface never seems to get any better.

 

Android: Whenever I check out an android device and start navigating the OS, two things spring to mind: "What the hell is this?" "Are you kidding me?" It is essentially more exploration of mediocrity and the lowest common denominator. It is no surprise since most Android vendors have PC mentality, with their garish sense of esthetics and loading devices with ad-based software crap.

 

So when you say Apple's stuff isn't materially better, I truly beg to differ.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

You're very optimistic and I wish I could be too. But the thing that set Apple apart is their marketing. I'm an Apple fan too but I'll be honest, their stuff isn't materially better than anyone else. It's all about selling us into the anticipation. The purchase, inboxing, and the look and feel of the product.
...
People think Apple's products last longer than competitors. I'll give it them that apple product are built very well, but they're not infallible. Customers take more pride in these products and take better care of them. And even a Windows PC works great with the right hardware and care.
...
But my point is that Cook isn't what Apple is. He's a nice guy and a strong manager. He's not a face of American innovation. My only hope is that he keeps Ive awake at his desk or I give this company 5 years before they're back to what they were in the 90's
Originally Posted by Granmastak: Labor unions managed to kill manufacturing a long time ago with their unreasonable demands. Now the people they were trying to protect, are out of a job.
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Originally Posted by Granmastak: Labor unions managed to kill manufacturing a long time ago with their unreasonable demands. Now the people they were trying to protect, are out of a job.
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post #21 of 37
AjbDtc826,

You're a very good troll. But one, nonetheless.

Maybe you can find something better to do than expertly hijacking the thread.

But, I guess you'll continue w a great reply to this comment, too.

(For those who need evidence, just retread this guy's remarks.)
post #22 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post
Learn what a troll is kid, I backed my opinions and claims up.

 

No, you haven't…

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #23 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post


Learn what a troll is kid, I backed my opinions and claims up.
And this isn't the time to coast on what was gifted to him in the heat of competition emerging in these new markets that Apple started: smartphone and tablet. There's very little differentiating themselves from the competition anymore besides brand loyalty. And if it turns into a spec war again, there's going to be some really bad days ahead.
But hey, I hope I'm wrong. Let's see what the next iPhone has that's exciting and never seen before. My $'s on nothing except LTE and bumped specs.

 

You are a troll. Your opinion and claims are backed up with unsubstantiated claims and your distorted view of reality not with facts.

 

Will you ever learn that is not about the specs? It is all about the performance and experience!


Edited by Realistic - 5/30/12 at 4:10am

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post #24 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

After my 2010 MBP's logic board went out on me after just a little over year, I don't have faith in their quality.
Same with OS X Lion. I didn't even know what the pinwheel looked like til I upgraded (8GB of ram btw). Now try using iPhoto at the same time as anything else.
Same with ios 5.0.1. The so-called battery life fixer that actually caused me to replace the phone (which it did, just a defective phone).
Safari? I'm sure I'm not in the minority when I say I use Chrome exclusively now.
Granted its still way better to use than the competition, but overall quality? Nah. Apple's as susceptible to failure as everything else. (except I've never had something as devastating as a board problem on a windows PC ever, let alone just a little over a year old)
But their products are still shiny and easy to use so I'll keep throwing money at them. Waiting to smell the new box scent with every purchase. I'm a sucker. But that's about the only thrill I get from actually using the products anymore. Waiting for a worthy alternative.

Some people actually get paid to say stuff like this on Apple blogs.  All made up of course but scripted to sound believable. Not sure if it's Microsoft or Samsung but I doubt RIM can afford it!  Did you ever come across any in all your time on this blog in the past? 

Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #25 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

You're very optimistic and I wish I could be too. But the thing that set Apple apart is their marketing.

Right from the start, you've established that you don't have a clue what you're talking about.

Marketing doesn't get you incredible customer retention ratings.
Marketing doesn't get you products that are so good that the rest of the industry mimics them.
Marketing doesn't get you an infrastructure so solid that after a customer buys one product, they come back to buy other products to fit together.
Marketing doesn't get you a reputation for products that 'just work' and allow you to retain it for decades.
Marketing doesn't get you product quality and performance ratings at the top of the pack.
Marketing doesn't get you the strongest performance in the industry for customer service.

Is it starting to sink in?
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
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post #26 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

Learn what a troll is kid, I backed my opinions and claims up.
And this isn't the time to coast on what was gifted to him in the heat of competition emerging in these new markets that Apple started: smartphone and tablet. There's very little differentiating themselves from the competition anymore besides brand loyalty. And if it turns into a spec war again, there's going to be some really bad days ahead.
But hey, I hope I'm wrong. Let's see what the next iPhone has that's exciting and never seen before. My $'s on nothing except LTE and bumped specs.



Tim Cook was never 'gifted' anything...the Late Steve Jobs never 'Gifted' anything... you worked and were/are well compensated!... read the steve jobs book for a clue!.

You are a troll, and invite an Godwin analogy...
post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

People think Apple's products last longer than competitors. I'll give it them that apple product are built very well, but they're not infallible. Customers take more pride in these products and take better care of them. And even a Windows PC works great with the right hardware and care.

Spec rot aside, we have high-end Dell laptops that die consistently at the 30-month mark and desktops at the 42 month mark. Prices might have a 15% delta between the comparable Mac, but we see 25-40% longer life with the up-front delta easily being absorbed by administration (12 extra hours per machine at $65/hour burdened cost is $1k.)

Also, interestingly, the monitors need to be replaced with the machines (or within 1 year average), as the never ending need for more screen real-estate pushes on. This, the all-in-one approach has no negative cost impact to us.

While we are still heavily weighted in our office to PCs, that has nothing to do with hardware costs.
post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

 But the thing that set Apple apart is their marketing.
 
 

 

You weren't doing too badly right up until then. 

post #29 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Right from the start, you've established that you don't have a clue what you're talking about.
Marketing doesn't get you incredible customer retention ratings.
Marketing doesn't get you products that are so good that the rest of the industry mimics them.
Marketing doesn't get you an infrastructure so solid that after a customer buys one product, they come back to buy other products to fit together.
Marketing doesn't get you a reputation for products that 'just work' and allow you to retain it for decades.
Marketing doesn't get you product quality and performance ratings at the top of the pack.
Marketing doesn't get you the strongest performance in the industry for customer service.
Is it starting to sink in?

 

This should be a sticky. 

 

It's ridiculously obvious, though. Shocking that some people can't rub a couple of brain cells together in order to figure it out. 

post #30 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

What did you get out of it? Nothing. He said absolutely nothing. He wasted an hour bringing nothing to the table. Get over yourselves, that's what you're going to get no matter how much you deny it. He was a big part of Apple's turnaround doing admin stuff under Jobs. He's not what made the company great, he was simply a helper.

 

Read between the lines. He said a lot by what he didn't say.

 

Some interesting snippets:

 

Walt: Is it possible to build a box and ignore the rest? Not build a TV but just build the box? 

Cook: We would look at this and say can we control the key technology? Can we make a significant contribution beyond what others have made in this area? Can we make a product that we would all want? That's all thing we would ask about any new product category. It's the ones we ask about products within families we're thinking about now. 

 

 

YES.

 

--

Kara: What do you think about how Google and Netflix are funding original content? 


Cook: I don't think Apple should be in the content business. We haven't had an issue for the most part in getting content. We have 30 million songs, virtually every song out there. Movies and TV shows get difficult because you have separate ownership in each country. For the most part, getting content isn't an issue. I think that there is a great art to doing content right. I have great appreciation for the content. This is an area where Apple partnering well is the right approach. Not making content. For funding, the greatest thing we can provide is to sell a lot of their stuff. If we can make an elegant solution with their content, that's the best thing we can do for all parties. 

 

EPIX

--

 

Kara: Do you see more acquisitions under the Tim Cook regime? 


Cook: We continue to buy companies. They aren't ones we seek to make public. 

Kara: Eventually you have to tell us. 

Cook: Depends on the value. If I don't have to, I won't. That's part of the doubling down. 

 

 

Lots of options out there. LEAP, NEST, NVIDIA etc...

 

--

 

Walt: Who's the curator these days at Apple? Steve was the curator or editor on these products. 

Cook: We have a privilege, because if I look around the executive team, many of the people are the people I've been working with for double digit years. We all know each other very well and have great respect for each other. 

The curator role moves, as it's always moved. 

Walt: It was a myth that he did it all. 

Cook: He said that no one person could do it all. Look at what we're doing, it's not possible. You could have an "S" on your chest and a cape and you couldn't do it all. He brought great people to the company and set a standard for who they brought in. That built an incredible company. He brought that foundation and his spirit will always be in the DNA of the company. I wouldn't get overly focused on who does what piece. The company doing all the things we're doing, there are a lot of key people. 

 

 

Good interview on Jonathan Ive here: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/apple/9283706/Jonathan-Ive-interview-simplicity-isnt-simple.html

 

Interesting snippet from Jony:

 

"Thus the calendar in Apple's Macs and on iOS has fake leather texture and even fake stitching.

When I mention the fake stitching, Ive offers a wince but it's a gesture of sympathy rather than a suggestion that he dislikes such things. At least, that's how I read it. He refuses to be drawn on the matter, offering a diplomatic reply: "My focus is very much working with the other teams on the product ideas and then developing the hardware and so that's our focus and that's our responsibility. In terms of those elements you're talking about, I'm not really connected to that."

 

 

 

 

post #31 of 37

What this interview did for me is increase my faith in Cook further. It's tough to imagine better responses than what he gave, or ones I would have wanted him to give. It's clear he understands Apple's culture, legacy, focus, and has sincere passion towards these things. He specifically stated in the interview that he's not Steve, he's not trying to be or replace Steve, and never will, something that many have illogically placed upon him. His role is to do the best possible job that he can do, leveraging his strength as well as perhaps learning to get stronger in areas that were not his strong point. Everything I've seen since he took the position indicated to me that he's done a phenomenal job so far, and will continue to do so- both in retaining Apple's culture, as well as making improvements in areas where Steve either didn't have the time or interest to do (understandably so, as he was only juggling a million things at once while fighting for his life). Nobody can predict the future, but I have trouble thinking of any living individual I would want in that role above Tim Cook. And yes, this includes considering Apple's other executives like Ive and Forstall, who I believe are best in their current roles right now. 

post #32 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post


Learn what a troll is kid, I backed my opinions and claims up.
And this isn't the time to coast on what was gifted to him in the heat of competition emerging in these new markets that Apple started: smartphone and tablet. There's very little differentiating themselves from the competition anymore besides brand loyalty. And if it turns into a spec war again, there's going to be some really bad days ahead.
But hey, I hope I'm wrong. Let's see what the next iPhone has that's exciting and never seen before. My $'s on nothing except LTE and bumped specs.

What effing innovation do you expect in 6 months? Apple's roadmap is probably laid out 3-6 years down the road already.

 

What major innovation do you really expect on a smartphone now? Why do you think the only thing Samsung or anyone esle are bringing to the table is bigger screens? Because the general utilities and feature sets of smart phones are now relatively established now.

 

ALL smart phones are simply fine tuning their devices now. Better battery life, better screen, incremental feature sets added to OS's. But I'm all ears about what innovations you have in mind?

post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

What this interview did for me is increase my faith in Cook further. It's tough to imagine better responses than what he gave, or ones I would have wanted him to give. It's clear he understands Apple's culture, legacy, focus, and has sincere passion towards these things. He specifically stated in the interview that he's not Steve, he's not trying to be or replace Steve, and never will, something that many have illogically placed upon him. His role is to do the best possible job that he can do, leveraging his strength as well as perhaps learning to get stronger in areas that were not his strong point. Everything I've seen since he took the position indicated to me that he's done a phenomenal job so far, and will continue to do so- both in retaining Apple's culture, as well as making improvements in areas where Steve either didn't have the time or interest to do (understandably so, as he was only juggling a million things at once while fighting for his life). Nobody can predict the future, but I have trouble thinking of any living individual I would want in that role above Tim Cook. And yes, this includes considering Apple's other executives like Ive and Forstall, who I believe are best in their current roles right now. 

I could not have said it better myself. I actually think Tim Cook answered a lot of the questions in a Steve Jobs fashion and I sensed a bit of RDF and I got excited lol

post #34 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjbDtc826 View Post

After my 2010 MBP's logic board went out on me after just a little over year, I don't have faith in their quality.
Same with OS X Lion. I didn't even know what the pinwheel looked like til I upgraded (8GB of ram btw). Now try using iPhoto at the same time as anything else.
Same with ios 5.0.1. The so-called battery life fixer that actually caused me to replace the phone (which it did, just a defective phone).
Safari? I'm sure I'm not in the minority when I say I use Chrome exclusively now.

 

In some ways, you're the worst kind of troll.  You're the kind of troll who doesn't even realize he's a troll.  That's evident in that you want to turn this page into a debate about you rather than discuss what the article was about.

 

That 2010 MBP?  It was developed under the leadership of Jobs

Safari?  ...under Jobs.

iOS 5.0.1?  ...under Jobs.

Lion?  ...under Jobs.

 

And yet, here you are building an argument against Tim Cook for not being Steve Jobs, even as you criticize products developed under the guidance of Steve Jobs.

 


But their products are still shiny and easy to use so I'll keep throwing money at them. Waiting to smell the new box scent with every purchase. I'm a sucker. But that's about the only thrill I get from actually using the products anymore. Waiting for a worthy alternative.
 

I'm guessing you're quite young.  Just out of high school, perhaps?

post #35 of 37

What is more important?  Apple's continued success, or the need for Steve Jobs worshippers to believe that Steve could do no wrong?  What will happen if Tim Cook makes a decision which goes against what Steve would have done, but results in more success for Apple?  Will Steve worshippers wish for Cook and Apple to fail for defying Steve?  Or will they have the courage to admit that Steve was wrong?


Edited by Haggar - 5/30/12 at 6:35pm
post #36 of 37

AjbDtc826

 

Wow!  You are getting owned on this forum.  

 

You just don't get Apple.  It's been this way for 30 years, whether Apple was doing well or poor.   People just don't get them and bring up all these crazy 20 year old Apple myths. 

 

4769.jpg


Edited by MessagePad2100 - 5/30/12 at 6:52pm
post #37 of 37
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