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Tim Cook: "I want there to be" American-made Apple products

post #1 of 57
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Pressed to answer why Apple doesn't own its own factories in China and, alternatively, why it isn't taking the lead to move manufacturing and assembly from China to the United States, Tim Cook answered "I want there to be" American-made products.

When asked by All Things Digital co-host Kara Swisher, "Why isn't there an Apple factory in China, run by Apple?" Cook answered, "We decided a decade ago that there were some things we could do ourselves better than anyone.

"But other things," Cook continued, "we decided we shouldn't put our own efforts into. Manufacturing was one of those. With manufacturing, we looked at it and said that someone else could do it better."

Walt Mossberg then asked Cook, "There's been a lot of talk recently about reviving manufacturing here in the U.S. You used to have a factory, I think in Colorado. You're probably the most influential company in technology, and you're an operations expert -- will there be an Apple product ever made again in America?"

Cook emphatically answered, "I want there to be! I want there to be!"

Tim Cook at D10


He then noted that "the [ARM semiconductor] engine for the iPad and iPhone are built in the U.S., in Austin, Texas. The [Corning] glass for your iPhone (sold worldwide) is made in Kentucky."

Cook then acknowledged, "there's an intense focus on the final assembly. Could that be done in the U.S.? I sure hope so. But look, how many tool-and-die makers do you know in America? I could ask them, nationwide, to come here tonight and we couldn't fill [a few hundred seats in] this room," noting that in China, tool-and-die makers fill cities.

"We will do as many of these things [in America] as we can do," Cook added, "and you can bet that we'll use the whole of our influence to do this."



"Will I ever buy an iPhone that on the rear, it says 'Made in California'?" Mossberg asked.

"It may, it may! I mean, you could say now that 'some parts are made in America,'" Cook said, reiterating processor and glass components before talking about software, and how much the "app economy" has blossomed in the US following the debut of the iPhone.

Cook's enthusiasm and optimism regarding the potential of a resurgence in American manufacturing comes in stark contrast to the matter of fact answers Steve Jobs provided just over a year ago.

When asked similar questions about the potential for U.S. assembly by US President Barack Obama, Jobs reportedly stated, "Those jobs aren't coming back."

In March, Apple began publishing figures outlining how many jobs the company was creating within the U.S. outside of final assembly, claiming that 514,000 people are employed in the States because of Apple.

Jobs


Echoing Cook's mention of new mobile development jobs, the company cited a 2012 study by TechNet that found that 466,000 jobs have been added to the U.S. economy related to mobile development.

Visit AppleInsider's D10 archive for more of Cook's comments and ongoing coverage of the conference.
post #2 of 57

Tool and Die makers have dried up because corporations cut all the jobs, Community Colleges stopped focusing on those programs and now everyone is running around asking where they went?

 

You sold them out. Of course it will take a few years to bring them back and ramp up existing talent with augmented skills and those same veteran tool and die talent to help train the next generation.

 

As big as the US is the Industrial Arts segment could be flush in 18 months.
 

post #3 of 57
Jobs was right - the manufacturing jobs aren't coming back, even if manufacturing comes back to America, because the only way mass manufacturing can exist in America is if it is highly automated, meaning lots of robots and few humans on the factory floor.

Labor costs in the USA are just too high, which is why Foxconn is expanding in Brazil and elsewhere, not here.
post #4 of 57
If Apple built the iPhone in the U.S. it would cost you $2000.

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post #5 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

If Apple built the iPhone in the U.S. it would cost you $2000.

A lot more than that, if even could be done. What you're looking is just the final assembly as Cook addressed in the interview...
Quote:
There's an intense focus on the final assembly. They don't think about all of the parts underneath, where the significant value of the buildable material is. Can this be done in the US? I hope so, one day.

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post #6 of 57
Labor costs aside. China controls the vast majority of rare earth elements needed in complex electronics. They only export so much. Thus, you have to build in china to have access to them.
post #7 of 57

Online Apple store is closed. May be new models of Macbooks? more part time jobs will be created at my local American town?

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post #8 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

If Apple built the iPhone in the U.S. it would cost you $2000.

Only if we continue to allow the federal government to over regulate and fix the cost of labor.

Hell with real unemployment at ~20% you would think that the government would get the memo.

post #9 of 57
Frankly this is nonsense.

First there are plenty of tool and die makers in the USA. However you won't get many of them to go to work for Apple. Second Chinas supply of trained talent isn't unlimited.

Second saying "I want there to be" is excutives talk for saying the there isn't a chance in hell with current conditions in the country. Wanting something and being able to deliver it is two different things.

There is hope though, when you can reliably sell millions of a device a quarter then automation can produce hardware cost effectively.

Lastly from a strategic standpoint having all of your manufacturing in one basket is stupid. One political misstep or one natural disaster and Apple is dead in the water. I'm surprised Apples board hasn't demanded spreading out risk.
post #10 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Frankly this is nonsense.
First there are plenty of tool and die makers in the USA. However you won't get many of them to go to work for Apple. Second Chinas supply of trained talent isn't unlimited.
Second saying "I want there to be" is excutives talk for saying the there isn't a chance in hell with current conditions in the country. Wanting something and being able to deliver it is two different things.
There is hope though, when you can reliably sell millions of a device a quarter then automation can produce hardware cost effectively.
Lastly from a strategic standpoint having all of your manufacturing in one basket is stupid. One political misstep or one natural disaster and Apple is dead in the water. I'm surprised Apples board hasn't demanded spreading out risk.

Yeah, that flooding in Thailand that halted hard drive production really left Apple dead in the water... *rolls eyes*

Apple's manufacturing is spread all over the place.  China is mainly the assembler.  Heck, certain component suppliers won't even manufacture their wares in China for fear China will rip-off their IP.  Instead, it's manufactured elsewhere (like in Japan or South Korea, then shipped to Foxconn in China to be assembled.

Now that Foxconn is opening another plant in Brazil, Apple is getting extra baskets.

post #11 of 57

Assembling stuff on a production line is not such a great life. The US already has the primo Apple jobs - chip, software and industrial design. And for the lower skilled, or people just getting a start in life, there are retail and transport jobs. Don't envy the Chinese, America.

post #12 of 57
"Tim Cook: 'I want there to be' Apple products made in America"
 
Sure, already done. Brazil is part of America. Learn Geography!
post #13 of 57

How disappointing. I mean seriously, I want Apple products to be made in Australia :)

 

How about the answer "our products sell all over the world, and we manufacturer around the world too. We'd like to become MORE international rather than LESS.".

post #14 of 57
Quote:

mdriftmeyer: Tool and Die makers have dried up because corporations cut all the jobs, Community Colleges stopped focusing on those programs and now everyone is running around asking where they went?

 

You sold them out. Of course it will take a few years to bring them back and ramp up existing talent with augmented skills and those same veteran tool and die talent to help train the next generation.

 

As big as the US is the Industrial Arts segment could be flush in 18 months.

 

I agree with this. Not to say the unions are not without blame. But basically we were sold out by the CEO/corporations in search of cheap labor/profits overseas. Now the CEO's are allowing China and Korea to steal our IP.

post #15 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patranus View Post

Only if we continue to allow the federal government to over regulate and fix the cost of labor.
Hell with real unemployment at ~20% you would think that the government would get the memo.

So when Congress reduces the minimum wage to $1 a day ( as you seem to think would be just peachy), where are these minimum wage workers supposed to live? How are they supposed to eat.
post #16 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patranus View Post

Only if we continue to allow the federal government to over regulate and fix the cost of labor.
Hell with real unemployment at ~20% you would think that the government would get the memo.

First, unemployment is not 20%.

Second, even if labor were free, it would be far more expensive to manufacture the iPhone in the US than in China. Labor is a relatively small portion of the problem.
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post #17 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Tool and Die makers have dried up because corporations cut all the jobs, Community Colleges stopped focusing on those programs and now everyone is running around asking where they went?

 

You sold them out. Of course it will take a few years to bring them back and ramp up existing talent with augmented skills and those same veteran tool and die talent to help train the next generation.

 

As big as the US is the Industrial Arts segment could be flush in 18 months.
 

Disagree. Those kind of manufacturing jobs for the US are long gone, and will stay gone. The US is so far behind countries like China in this segment, they will never catch up. From a future investment perspective, the US ranks dead last in metrics such as human capital (education and training), IT infrastructure, and economic performance, among some 40 industrialized nations. If we don't get straightened out quickly, the US will not be a viable competitor in the future global economy.

post #18 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by muadibe View Post


So when Congress reduces the minimum wage to $1 a day ( as you seem to think would be just peachy), where are these minimum wage workers supposed to live? How are they supposed to eat.

This is where Foxconn is genius. They'v created their own manufacturing cities, where one can live at a discount, and the work place provides everything that you need from food to entertainment. These people basically live at Foxconn and are able to easily survive on their pay scale.

post #19 of 57
if the iPhone was made inthe USA, people would still grey market the china iPhone because it would be cheaper.

The US would never levy a Customs duty on china made products!... free trade!...


Why is the Xbox not made in the USA?... Microsoft has more than enough money to make manufacturing plants in the USA, and the consoles design does not change yearly... if you can answer why the Xbox is not made in the USA, you will have the answer to why the iPhone is not made in the USA.
post #20 of 57

What is it about this fetish of being "made in America?"

 

Geez.

 

Most complex products are "made" across the globe. Why is this made. What is magical or wonderful about every element of a product being made within the boundaries of the U.S.?

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post #21 of 57
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Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

What is it about this fetish of being "made in America?"

 

Geez.

 

Most complex products are "made" across the globe. Why is this made. What is magical or wonderful about every element of a product being made within the boundaries of the U.S.?

For me I just want to support jobs in my own country. If I lived in Canada, I'd want to support Canadian jobs. Ireland, Norway, Sweden, etc.

 

It's not everything that I want to be made here though I am sick of buying everything from clothes to electronics and seeing "Made in China."

post #22 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Assembling stuff on a production line is not such a great life. The US already has the primo Apple jobs - chip, software and industrial design. And for the lower skilled, or people just getting a start in life, there are retail and transport jobs. Don't envy the Chinese, America.

ASCII this is nonsense. Retail or even transport do not match the wage rates seen in manufacturing and never will. It is all about skill level, with many manufacturing jobs requiring significant skills sets beyond standing in a retail shop. I also wonder if you have even been inside a modern production plant in the US.

To put it more bluntly if you are just getting started in life, retail will keep you stuck in a low paying field. Manufacturing on the other hand offers upward mobility as one can through the combination of education and on the job skills building move into better paying occupations. I know many an engineer that got his degree while working in a manufacturing facility for example. More importantly these sorts of people have a better sense of what works it the real world.

In any event it isn't a question of envy when it comes to China. What many really fear is what will happen to the USA if we totally give up on manufacturing. The strength of an economy is directly tied to the ability to produce goods and services. One only has to look to the EU to see what happens when welfare states loose any sense of what keeps an economy going.
post #23 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregAlexander View Post

How disappointing. I mean seriously, I want Apple products to be made in Australia 1smile.gif

How about the answer "our products sell all over the world, and we manufacturer around the world too. We'd like to become MORE international rather than LESS.".

+1...
post #24 of 57

If jerks in Congress would stop blocking recovery and destroying education, Tim could get his wish.

post #25 of 57
The US has the highest corporate tax rate in the world (after Japan lowered theirs last month). Between taxes, state and federal regulations, environmental regulations, soaring energy costs and the fact that they wouldn't break ground on a new factory before the unions would be lined up to bully Apple into some ridiculous deal, it should come as no surprise corporations do what's best to stay in business. And who pays for it when this happens? Us. Businesses are not charities, they are businesses, it is their nature to survive and thrive. Think about stuff like this come November, elect with common sense and look at people's actual experience and character, not mob mentality..
post #26 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

What is it about this fetish of being "made in America?"
It is about the future of the country. An economy can't sustain itself without manufacturing. It is also about having a diversity of occupations so that all people can take part in the economy.
Quote:
Geez.

Most complex products are "made" across the globe. Why is this made. What is magical or wonderful about every element of a product being made within the boundaries of the U.S.?

It isn't magical at all, it is however all about economics and the continuation of a vibrant and dynamic work force. While I often see people going overboard with their anti China rants one has to admit that in many cases the American work force has been screwed over by the rush to China. In many cases a rush to China that never benefitted the companies involved. In a real sense many American jobs where lost to the herd mentality of the managerial class. It must be noted too that when manufacturing leaves the USA so too do the engineering and mid level management jobs. It isn't simply a discussion about the worker on the production floor, it is him, the structure that supports him and the external businesses supplying that manufacturing job.

In simple terms remove too much manufacturing from an economy and that economy dies.
post #27 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

What is it about this fetish of being "made in America?"

 

Geez.

 

Most complex products are "made" across the globe. Why is this made. What is magical or wonderful about every element of a product being made within the boundaries of the U.S.?

 

It's the economy, stupid.  (I'm not actually calling you stupid, that's just the way the saying goes....)

post #28 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebudda View Post

The US has the highest corporate tax rate in the world (after Japan lowered theirs last month). Between taxes, state and federal regulations, environmental regulations, soaring energy costs and the fact that they wouldn't break ground on a new factory before the unions would be lined up to bully Apple into some ridiculous deal. And who pays for it when this happens? Us. Think about stuff like this come November, elect with common sense, not mob mentality.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleZilla View Post

If jerks in Congress would stop blocking recovery and destroying education, Tim could get his wish.

Here in lies the problem, both of you are right that part of our problem is our government. That is the good part; the bad part is that put into a room the two of you would endlessly argue over the right approach to correct the problem.

By the way congress isn't blocking recovery, what it is blocking is stupid moves by the current administration that would make things worst.

One of the worst things we do as a country is focus to much on the people that don't make a difference. That is the welfare or as I like to refer to them the stupid class. The welfare system drains far to much money from the federal and state budgets to do anything to actually help the country. It is about time we let the hopeless suffer and make sure they can't reproduce. One simple fix would be to tie welfare check to ten lashes a week, soon after such a program was implemented there would be far fewer lazy people enrolled in the welfare system! There is nothing more disgusting than the people that have never worked a day in their lives, living high on the hog at the publics expense.
post #29 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

It is about the future of the country. An economy can't sustain itself without manufacturing.

 

There's no evidence that this is necessarily true. In fact the same kind of thing was said during the decline of agricultural employment.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

It is also about having a diversity of occupations so that all people can take part in the economy. It isn't magical at all, it is however all about economics and the continuation of a vibrant and dynamic work force.

 

Why? Just because? Do you care to provide evidence for your (implied) claim that this is necessary?

 

The real fact is that in both of the above statements you're limiting your concern to only the U.S. economy. Yes "an economy" needs to make things, but there's no evidence to support the claim that this boundaries of this economy must be within some lines on a map. Secondly, there is a diversity of occupations that all people can take part in, you just seem to be only concerned that those people are not in the U.S. There are tons of people around the world making things for tons of people around the world.

 

Bottom line: There is no reason to believe (and many reason to not believe, based on a sound understanding of economics) that economic concerns should be limited by some lines on a map.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

While I often see people going overboard with their anti China rants one has to admit that in many cases the American work force has been screwed over by the rush to China. In many cases a rush to China that never benefitted the companies involved. In a real sense many American jobs where lost to the herd mentality of the managerial class. It must be noted too that when manufacturing leaves the USA so too do the engineering and mid level management jobs. It isn't simply a discussion about the worker on the production floor, it is him, the structure that supports him and the external businesses supplying that manufacturing job. In simple terms remove too much manufacturing from an economy and that economy dies.

 

Again, I would note that your concern about "the economy" and "the workers" appears to be limited only to the U.S. economy and workers. You should take some time to reflect on that.

 

The reality is that there isn't a "U.S. economy". There is an economy...that encompasses the entire world. It involves billions of people, many of whom want to do work and elevate their standard of living by being productive. Whether these people are Chinese or American matters little in the whole scheme of things.

 

The overall global economy (and the people in it) benefits greatly the more people who are brought into the economy, the more trade and exchange that occurs, the more division and specialization of labor that occurs and the more that people work to their comparative advantage.

 

I cannot emphasize that last sentence enough.

 

At the present time, the people of China have a comparative advantage in assembling goods. In the future it might be some other people (perhaps in Africa). At the present time many North American people have a comparative advantage in things like designing products (among other things). This, of course, is simplistic because we're speaking in broad terms about large swaths of people. Arguably it is not countries that necessarily have a comparative advantage it is people. Perhaps a collection of people in the form of a company. For example, Apple as a comparative advantage in designing products while Foxconn has a comparative advantage in assembling products.

 

The world benefits the more people are brought into productive economic activity and trade with everyone. And people suffer the more narrow the extent of trade. THAT is the economic reality. You want a couple of examples of this? Look at the U.S. now as compared to 50 or 100 years ago. The people of the U.S. are unquestionably better off now. A significant factor in that has been the expanded amount of trade it engages in as more and more countries have been drawn into economic activity and trade. Or, for counter examples...look at what happens to countries that are trade constrained (whether self imposed or externally imposed): Cuba, North Korea, the former Soviet bloc countries, even Africa, Iraq, etc. You see it isn't manufacturing per se...it is economic activity and trade more generally. Or better yet, take this whole "we need to make it ourselves" thing to its most logical extreme...you make everything for yourself and never, ever "outsource" manufacturing of any of the good you use to a "foreigner" (someone outside your family or household). Would you be richer or poorer?


Edited by MJ1970 - 5/30/12 at 7:51am

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post #30 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Assembling stuff on a production line is not such a great life. The US already has the primo Apple jobs - chip, software and industrial design. And for the lower skilled, or people just getting a start in life, there are retail and transport jobs. Don't envy the Chinese, America.

 

Good point. I read somewhere recently that the auto workers retired early for a reason. They loathed their jobs.

post #31 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

In any event it isn't a question of envy when it comes to China. What many really fear is what will happen to the USA if we totally give up on manufacturing. The strength of an economy is directly tied to the ability to produce goods and services. One only has to look to the EU to see what happens when welfare states loose any sense of what keeps an economy going.

If you value manufacturing jobs so much, it is possible for a developed country to have such jobs: Germany did it. But the way they did it was the government and companies and unions all agreeing to keep wages suppressed for the last decade. Do Americans have that sort of willpower?


Edited by ascii - 5/30/12 at 8:08am
post #32 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwlaw99 View Post

Labor costs aside. China controls the vast majority of rare earth elements needed in complex electronics. They only export so much. Thus, you have to build in china to have access to them.

US has lots of rare earth elements. They are too expensive to mine basically because strip mining is the way it is done and the environmental damage needs to be cleaned up afterwards.

Quote:
Originally Posted by universeman View Post

Jobs was right - the manufacturing jobs aren't coming back, even if manufacturing comes back to America, because the only way mass manufacturing can exist in America is if it is highly automated, meaning lots of robots and few humans on the factory floor.
Labor costs in the USA are just too high, which is why Foxconn is expanding in Brazil and elsewhere, not here.

It might be worth considering building the actual robots as an industry that could reestablish the US as a manufacturing center.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patranus View Post

Only if we continue to allow the federal government to over regulate and fix the cost of labor.

Hell with real unemployment at ~20% you would think that the government would get the memo.

The government cannot fix anything. Their hands are tied by the two party duopoly and everything they try just makes matters worse.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Assembling stuff on a production line is not such a great life. The US already has the primo Apple jobs - chip, software and industrial design. And for the lower skilled, or people just getting a start in life, there are retail and transport jobs. Don't envy the Chinese, America.

My concern is that we are not capable of sustainability without the industrial base. Soon the US will be completely dependent on China. We won't be able to build an airplane or a car without China.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleZilla View Post

If jerks in Congress would stop blocking recovery and destroying education, Tim could get his wish.

Pop culture is what is destroying education in this country. People growing up in disadvantaged neighborhoods would rather have 20 tattoos and 20" rims than a scholarship.

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post #33 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by universeman View Post

Jobs was right - the manufacturing jobs aren't coming back, even if manufacturing comes back to America, because the only way mass manufacturing can exist in America is if it is highly automated, meaning lots of robots and few humans on the factory floor.
Labor costs in the USA are just too high, which is why Foxconn is expanding in Brazil and elsewhere, not here.

I agree.  The jobs aren't coming back any time soon.  There is no infrastructure to build a base and support it in the long term.

 

Labor costs are high, but I don't see that as a bad thing.  We want skilled workers who are treated well.  The standards in China aren't near the standards of comfort, safety and fairness expected from an American worker force.  And we shouldn't have to expect less just for the luxury of having a job.

post #34 of 57

But, maybe more importantly, iPhones and iPads aside, U.S. manufacturing isn't as dead as everyone thinks.

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post #35 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

Look at the U.S. now as compared to 50 or 100 years ago. The people of the U.S. are unquestionably better off now.

They are?  I don't want to get too political but I think it's far from obvious that we're better off now than in say the 1950's.  We might make more on average but that's just inflation.  The percentage of our earning we spend on life essentials (gas, home, college, etc) has risen dramatically.

post #36 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

But, maybe more importantly, iPhones and iPads aside, U.S. manufacturing isn't as dead as everyone thinks.

That's absolutely true. There is still a lot of manufacturing done in the U.S. and no signs that it will end soon.

HOWEVER, I think the point is that the high volume manufacture of consumer products is greatly diminished. I don't know if it's still true, but at one point, more than 1/3 of everything on Walmart's shelves was made in China. Some products are just not available from US manufacturers in volume any more. For example, try to find a high volume, competitively priced fishing rod. Or patio furniture (those were the last two purchases where I went out of my way to buy American). It's clearly a mis-statement to say that nothing is manufactured in the US any more, but looking at our balance of trade, it's clear that we're importing a huge percentage.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

If you value manufacturing jobs so much, it is possible for a developed country to have such jobs: Germany did it. But the way they did it was the government and companies and unions all agreeing to keep wages suppressed for the last decade. Do Americans have that sort of willpower?

As stated before (repeatedly), labor rates alone won't do it. Even if American labor were free, many products would not be competitive if manufactured here. Just a few examples:

- Taxes. US federal taxes are among the highest in the world. Add in state and local income taxes as well as property taxes, social security contribution (not included in our tax rates, but generally included in other countries), unemployment insurance, etc, etc, etc and our corporations pay far, far more to the government here than just about anywhere else.

- Legal. Lawsuits are incredibly expensive and time consuming. At one time, I read that 1/2 of the cost of manufacturing ladders was insurance and legal. That sounds like an exaggeration, but it gets the point across.

- Infrastructure. We don't have the readily available supply chains that are available in China, for example.

- Labor availability. In China, if you need 10,000 workers, you can have them in a week. Not so here.

- Worker motivation. Like it or not, the work ethic here is not what it once was

- Environmental. Environmental rules add (both directly and indirectly) immensely to the cost of many products.

- OSHA regulations. While few people would argue that there should be no regulation, some OSHA rules are clearly over the top

- State rights. Particularly in respect to things like regulations, it's difficult to set up multiple factories without modifying them to match local requirements. That adds cost and complexity.

And so on. It really isn't hard to identify plenty of more reasons why manufacturing in the U.S. is far more expensive than elsewhere - even ignoring hourly labor rates.
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post #37 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by yensid98 View Post

They are?  I don't want to get too political but I think it's far from obvious that we're better off now than in say the 1950's.  We might make more on average but that's just inflation.  The percentage of our earning we spend on life essentials (gas, home, college, etc) has risen dramatically.

 

Then you're not paying attention. It is not "just inflation" (though that is certainly bad).

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post #38 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

HOWEVER, I think the point is that the high volume manufacture of consumer products is greatly diminished. I don't know if it's still true, but at one point, more than 1/3 of everything on Walmart's shelves was made in China. Some products are just not available from US manufacturers in volume any more. For example, try to find a high volume, competitively priced fishing rod. Or patio furniture (those were the last two purchases where I went out of my way to buy American). It's clearly a mis-statement to say that nothing is manufactured in the US any more, but looking at our balance of trade, it's clear that we're importing a huge percentage.

 

OK. So? Why does it matter? The reality you're seeing is that U.S. manufacturing has evolved from lower value to higher value items. This is a GOOD thing and we should hope it keeps happening (and it probably will unless Washington keeps trying to wreck the country).

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

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post #39 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by yensid98 View Post

Labor costs are high, but I don't see that as a bad thing.  We want skilled workers who are treated well.  The standards in China aren't near the standards of comfort, safety and fairness expected from an American worker force.  And we shouldn't have to expect less just for the luxury of having a job.

It's not necessary to lower wages to the level of China, since US factories are far more efficient anyway. It is however necessary to not go silly.

post #40 of 57

If you notice...the plants in the US are in right to work states.  Jobs always said if there were any plants coming back to the US..they would be in those states.  Union has killed the tool and die industry..not the CEO's.  There are still plenty of trade schools that will teach the trade..but most jobs were in the union market and those dried up.  Totally their fault.

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