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Nest thermostat now available for $250 in Apple's online store

post #1 of 54
Thread Starter 
After more than nine hours of downtime, the Apple online store returned Wednesday morning offering the Nest Learning Thermostat for $250.

The new product was created by ex-Apple executive Tony Fadell, who is credited with the title "grandfather of the iPod." The thermostat is the first product from startup Nest Labs, which was founded by Fadell after he left Apple in 2010.

Last week, word first surfaced that Apple would also begin stocking the Nest thermostat at its brick-and-mortar stores. The inclusion of the thermostat is interesting, as the device is not directly associated with an Apple product. Most third-party products carried by Apple are offerings like iPhone cases, speakers and other accessories.

Though he is the former vice president of Apple's iPod division, and the Nest thermostat has its own iPhone application on the App Store, Fadell no longer has any official ties with Apple.

"The Nest Learning Thermostat helps you stop wasting energy, while providing control using your iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, or Mac," the official product description reads on Apple's online store.

Nest


"Consider that your thermostat controls about half your energy bill—more than TV, appliances, and lighting combined. But it's wasting energy every time it turns on the heating or cooling system in an empty house. The Nest Learning Thermostat solves this problem by programming itself, turning itself down when you're away, and keeping track of your energy use."

The Nest thermostat is advertised as being compatible with the iPhone 4S, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS, all iPad models, and the fourth- and third-generation iPod touch. Features of the device, as highlighted in the Apple store, include:
  • Remembers preferred temperatures
  • Creates a personalized schedule
  • Turns itself down when your house is empty
  • Uses Airwave to automatically lower cooling costs
  • Change the temperature from anywhere
  • Control Nest anywhere with iPhone, iPad, or Mac
  • Shows exactly when heating or cooling was on
  • Points out what causes spikes in energy use

The product available for sale comes with the thermostat display, the thermostat base, installation and "Start Here" guides, mounting screws and labels, and an optional mounting kit. Customers can also visit the official Nest website to ensure that the product is compatible with their existing air condition system.
post #2 of 54

What is THIS tripe?!

 

Screen Shot 2012-05-30 at 9.27.08 AM.png

 

What's wrong with "Apple Store Online" as a page title?!

 

This isn't Micro Center, for frick's sake. This is Apple.

 

Also, the Nest thermostat doesn't seem to be under any category at all, so you have to know it's there and search for it by name to find it.

 

Screen Shot 2012-05-30 at 9.30.46 AM.png

Originally posted by Marvin

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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #3 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


The inclusion of the thermostat is interesting, as the device is not directly associated with an Apple product. Most third-party products carried by Apple are offerings like iPhone cases, speakers and other accessories.
 

 

Actually AI, it's not interesting because Apple has been selling a host of third-party App-Enabled Accessories such as an iGrill Grilling/Cooking Thermometer, blood pressure monitor, Golfsense sensor, and so forth for quite sometime.  At least you weren't as ignorant as Gizmodo when they sarcastically asked, "what's next, domestic appliances?"   

 


Edited by markbyrn - 5/30/12 at 6:45am
post #4 of 54

I've been waiting for these to come to the UK since I first read about them. They're a cracking little device and I was even willing to change my boiler to one compatible (need a new boiler anyway). Sadly they don't make an EU version or ship outside of the US at the moment. Meh.

post #5 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by markbyrn View Post

Actually AI, it's not interesting because Apple has been selling a host of third-party App-Enabled Accessories such as an iGrill Grilling/Cooking Thermometer, blood pressure monitor, Golfsense sensor, and so forth for quite sometime.  At least you weren't as ignorant as Gizmodo when they sarcastically asked, "what's next, domestic appliances?"   

 



Didn't all those items come out with access exclusivly via an Apple device whereas Nest was designed around iOS and Android from the start?

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post #6 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

What is THIS tripe?!

 

Screen Shot 2012-05-30 at 9.27.08 AM.png

 

What's wrong with "Apple Store Online" as a page title?!

 

This isn't Micro Center, for frick's sake. This is Apple.

 

 

What's wrong with it? Tripe is false or worthless - certainly you are not claiming that the information is false - so you must think it is worthless (unless you are simply mis-using the word tripe). 

 

Assuming that you are in fact claiming that the information is worthless I would posit that that this is a matter of opinion - and you know what they say about opinions. 

 

So exactly what is your beef with a page title that goes beyond the most simplistic information? 

 

Do you also not like the iPod page title that says: Apple - Play Music and More on iPod -- surely even aboriginal people in the outback of Australia know what an iPod is and what you can do with it and Apple should stop wasting the extra bandwidth it takes to transmit those extra bytes every time someone hits the page and spend that money on R&D. 

 

How about the iTunes page title: Apple - iTunes - Everything you need to be entertained. That sounds like to me like the basis for a class action lawsuit - how can iTunes be EVERYTHING you need to be entertained - surely you need a device on which to run iTunes, maybe some popcorn... 

 

While we are at it - lets not leave others out of this - www.usa.gov has this page title: USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web Portal  -- who would have guessed. 

 

Seriously - did someone wiz in your Wheaties this morning or what? for all the folks who post on these pages that the original AI content is lacking of newsworthiness did you really think your rant about a page title would set the internet abuzz with meaningful discussion? 

post #7 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


Last week, word first surfaced that Apple would also begin stocking the Nest thermostat at its brick-and-mortar stores. The inclusion of the thermostat is interesting, as the device is not directly associated with an Apple product. Most third-party products carried by Apple are offerings like iPhone cases, speakers and other accessories.

 

it is connected to an iOS app same as the baby monitors, weight scales, blood pressure cuffs etc. 

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post #8 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Didn't all those items come out with access exclusivly via an Apple device whereas Nest was designed around iOS and Android from the start?

 

So what. Apple sells lots of hard drives that could be reformat to work with Windows machines, microphones that work with PCs etc. 

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post #9 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post
What's wrong with it?

 

Apple isn't some dime store sleazy website operation.

 

Quote:
So exactly what is your beef with a page title that goes beyond the most simplistic information? 

 

It is completely and utterly unnecessary, and therefore shouldn't have been added. It's like adding a PS/2 port to the iPad.

Originally posted by Marvin

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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #10 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

What is THIS tripe?!

 

it's not rubbish. It's accessibility. That information is used by Voice Over systems like the ones that Apple has in their OS for those that are visually impaired. Same reason for alt tags on images. Especially if they are also links. 

 

Now it would be nice, to spare folks like you the 'rubbish' if they could come up with a new tag that makes that kind of text invisible to the eye but not the voice but that hasn't happened yet so you'll just have to deal 

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post #11 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Didn't all those items come out with access exclusivly via an Apple device whereas Nest was designed around iOS and Android from the start?

 

I don't know but not all the Apple Store 3rd party app-enabled products are exclusive to iOS.  For example, the Parrot AR.Drone 2.0 can be controlled with an iOS or Android application.  Regardless, the articles I've read about Apple selling the Nest suggest that Apple is doing something outside their normal business practice, perhaps because the Nest was made by a former Apple exec.  It's not true though since Apple has been selling third party app-enabled products for a long time.  Shlocky journalism.   

post #12 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

So what. Apple sells lots of hard drives that could be reformat to work with Windows machines, microphones that work with PCs etc. 

So what indeed. Those items you mention are standard components, peripherals and accessories but Nest is not. Nest is an independent device just like Apple's products are independent devices. It's very, very different than a pair of Shure of headphones which makes this a unique change in the type of items Apple sells. Why is that a bad thing? It follows Apple's philosophy, it was started by an ex-Apple employee, and I'm sure Apple is getting a huge chunk of their profit for getting the high-profile placement within an Apple Store. It's a good thing for Nest.

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post #13 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by markbyrn View Post

I don't know but not all the Apple Store 3rd party app-enabled products are exclusive to iOS.  For example, the Parrot AR.Drone 2.0 can be controlled with an iOS or Android application.  Regardless, the articles I've read about Apple selling the Nest suggest that Apple is doing something outside their normal business practice, perhaps because the Nest was made by a former Apple exec.  It's not true though since Apple has been selling third party app-enabled products for a long time.  Shlocky journalism.   

The AR.Drone is controlled by Android now but originally it was iOS exclusive. I'm glad to see Apple doesn't have a rule that restricts these vendors from releasing an app on a competitor's platform if they want to sell in their store. I can certainly see Apple doing something like that.

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post #14 of 54

Cool news. Apple's always been good with appliances.

post #15 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

After more than nine hours of downtime, the Apple online store returned Wednesday morning offering the Nest Learning Thermostat for $250.

 

The Canadian store was also down, but there's no mention of the Nest there and someone mentioned it's only available in the US... so why were other stores down? Do all the stores go down for one update in one place?

post #16 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I'm glad to see Apple doesn't have a rule that restricts these vendors from releasing an app on a competitor's platform if they want to sell in their store. I can certainly see Apple doing something like that.

 

I can't see Apple doing that.  If that was the case, they wouldn't sell 3rd party printers that work with a PC as well as Mac.  Even their own products such as AirPort Extreme Base Station work with a PC.  Requiring that 3rd party products only work with Apple stuff would mean less sales.     

post #17 of 54

It's really no big deal. Just another 'thing' you can buy that interfaces with your iOS device. Extensions to your ecosystem, if you will.

 

http://store.apple.com/us/browse/home/shop_ipad/ipad_accessories/app_enabled
 

post #18 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpinDrift View Post

I've been waiting for these to come to the UK since I first read about them. They're a cracking little device and I was even willing to change my boiler to one compatible (need a new boiler anyway). Sadly they don't make an EU version or ship outside of the US at the moment. Meh.

 

I think it's such a huge marketing mistake for them to have that giant "72" (degrees) on the box and on all the product shots too.  They do ship these to Canada I think, and I'd be pretty gob-smacked if they didn't also do Celsius (It would actually be illegal to sell them in Canada if they didn't), but it's such a stupid move in terms of advertising their product to the rest of the world.  

 

USA is almost the only country on the planet that doesn't have Celsius now as the official temperature standard.  To advertise your product with a temperature that would read as deadly to the largest part of your potential audience is just dumb IMO.   

post #19 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

USA is almost the only country on the planet that doesn't have Celsius now as the official temperature standard.  To advertise your product with a temperature that would read as deadly to the largest part of your potential audience is just dumb IMO.   

 

The U.S. is currently their ONLY audience for this product, thus using Farenheit makes sense. Otherwise, it would appear to be reading a temperature that was below freezing to their target customers, which would be just as dumb.

 

(No, the U.S. Apple Store doesn't ship to Canada.)

post #20 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

USA is almost the only country on the planet that doesn't have Celsius now as the official temperature standard.  To advertise your product with a temperature that would read as deadly to the largest part of your potential audience is just dumb IMO.   

Well if they're advertising in the USA, showing 70 degrees as 21 might lead people to believe the thermostat is broken.  Of course if they sell in Canada, they should change the adverts to celsius as well as advertise in French.  Not everything has to be the same everywhere, eh?  

post #21 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

USA is almost the only country on the planet that doesn't have Celsius now as the official temperature standard.  To advertise your product with a temperature that would read as deadly to the largest part of your potential audience is just dumb IMO.   

The product is obviously only targeted towards the US market at the moment, so the rest of the world is irrelevant.

 

And somebody would have to be pretty dumb and extremely ignorant (no matter where they come from) to not realize that the 72 depicted is in Fahrenheit.

post #22 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

I think it's such a huge marketing mistake for them to have that giant "72" (degrees) on the box and on all the product shots too.  They do ship these to Canada I think, and I'd be pretty gob-smacked if they didn't also do Celsius (It would actually be illegal to sell them in Canada if they didn't), but it's such a stupid move in terms of advertising their product to the rest of the world.  

 

USA is almost the only country on the planet that doesn't have Celsius now as the official temperature standard.  To advertise your product with a temperature that would read as deadly to the largest part of your potential audience is just dumb IMO.   

I have 4 Nests in my house (4 zones) and we have them set to Celsius. Works fine.

post #23 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpinDrift View Post

I've been waiting for these to come to the UK since I first read about them. They're a cracking little device and I was even willing to change my boiler to one compatible (need a new boiler anyway). Sadly they don't make an EU version or ship outside of the US at the moment. Meh.

 

I think it's such a huge marketing mistake for them to have that giant "72" (degrees) on the box and on all the product shots too.  They do ship these to Canada I think, and I'd be pretty gob-smacked if they didn't also do Celsius (It would actually be illegal to sell them in Canada if they didn't), but it's such a stupid move in terms of advertising their product to the rest of the world.  

 

USA is almost the only country on the planet that doesn't have Celsius now as the official temperature standard.  To advertise your product with a temperature that would read as deadly to the largest part of your potential audience is just dumb IMO.   

 

Every Canadian (maybe 100 people from the Toronto area) I've met knows what 72 degrees means, and could care less if it's being advertised that way. Of course, maybe the rest of Canada has forgotten, and is never bombarded by American media.

 

I've had one of these since February, and while it's pretty, I haven't really done anything with it that I couldn't do with a simple programmable thermostat from a hardware store. Sure, programming it is a bit easier, but it achieves the same result. I guess there's an argument that, if you want to remember to constantly adjust the temperature for the first couple of weeks, it can learn the program on its own. Seems like a trivial feature for $200 though. I guess there's also some potential for interesting stuff if your house has different zones, and you wanted to network a couple of these, but how many people have that available?

post #24 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by jukes View Post

 

Every Canadian (maybe 100 people from the Toronto area) I've met knows what 72 degrees means, and could care less if it's being advertised that way. Of course, maybe the rest of Canada has forgotten, and is never bombarded by American media.

 

I've had one of these since February, and while it's pretty, I haven't really done anything with it that I couldn't do with a simple programmable thermostat from a hardware store. Sure, programming it is a bit easier, but it achieves the same result. I guess there's an argument that, if you want to remember to constantly adjust the temperature for the first couple of weeks, it can learn the program on its own. Seems like a trivial feature for $200 though. I guess there's also some potential for interesting stuff if your house has different zones, and you wanted to network a couple of these, but how many people have that available?

Actually, the Nest does quite a few things automatically that a simple programmable thermostat doesn't do. It knows the outdoor temperature, and uses that information to better control the inside temperature. It monitors humidity in the air, and uses that information to better control the inside temperature. It can automatically know when you are away, turning off your heater/AC. With the AirWave feature, it can turn off the AC compressor while leaving the fan on because it knows that the compressor will remain cool for quite awhile after it's switched off. It monitors your actual energy usage. It's also Zigbee compliant, so can be used with other home automation items like closing/opening automated shades.

 

Almost none of those things are available on a simple programmable thermostat, or even "advanced" ones. I have Nests in my house, and it easily took 25% off my utility bill compared to the programmable thermostats I replaced.

post #25 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by focher View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jukes View Post

 

Every Canadian (maybe 100 people from the Toronto area) I've met knows what 72 degrees means, and could care less if it's being advertised that way. Of course, maybe the rest of Canada has forgotten, and is never bombarded by American media.

 

I've had one of these since February, and while it's pretty, I haven't really done anything with it that I couldn't do with a simple programmable thermostat from a hardware store. Sure, programming it is a bit easier, but it achieves the same result. I guess there's an argument that, if you want to remember to constantly adjust the temperature for the first couple of weeks, it can learn the program on its own. Seems like a trivial feature for $200 though. I guess there's also some potential for interesting stuff if your house has different zones, and you wanted to network a couple of these, but how many people have that available?

Actually, the Nest does quite a few things automatically that a simple programmable thermostat doesn't do. It knows the outdoor temperature, and uses that information to better control the inside temperature. It monitors humidity in the air, and uses that information to better control the inside temperature. It can automatically know when you are away, turning off your heater/AC. With the AirWave feature, it can turn off the AC compressor while leaving the fan on because it knows that the compressor will remain cool for quite awhile after it's switched off. It monitors your actual energy usage. It's also Zigbee compliant, so can be used with other home automation items like closing/opening automated shades.

 

Almost none of those things are available on a simple programmable thermostat, or even "advanced" ones. I have Nests in my house, and it easily took 25% off my utility bill compared to the programmable thermostats I replaced.

 

Those are great features from a marketing perspective but it's not clear that they actually add up to anything concrete. If you're spending 25% less on heating/ac with the nest then I have to question if you had your programmable thermostat set up correctly or if you're exaggerating a little bit. I suppose the "away" feature would be useful if your house is frequently empty for extended periods of time.

 

Edit: I agree the Zigbee thing might matter for those who have other home automation things going, but they're also unlikely to be concerned about the extra $200 cost. I just seriously doubt that there's much utility to the nest for most people. I mainly have one because it's cool to have stuff that other people don't have.

post #26 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by jukes View Post

 

Those are great features from a marketing perspective but it's not clear that they actually add up to anything concrete. If you're spending 25% less on heating/ac with the nest then I have to question if you had your programmable thermostat set up correctly or if you're exaggerating a little bit. I suppose the "away" feature would be useful if your house is frequently empty for extended periods of time.

 

Edit: I agree the Zigbee thing might matter for those who have other home automation things going, but they're also unlikely to be concerned about the extra $200 cost. I just seriously doubt that there's much utility to the nest for most people. I mainly have one because it's cool to have stuff that other people don't have.

I think you pretty much decided that the Nest is just a nice looking programmable thermostat, and wholly discount the intelligence it brings to the energy usage equation by incorporating a lot more data points beyond simply "set the temperature to X between this time and that time". I'm not suggesting it's perfect - for example, multiple Nests don't work together for efficiency sake and you're still stuck with out-of-balance AC/heating problems where the Nest's sensors aren't always where they should be to control the elements - but it's not just a nice looking thermostat.

 

Nest is also now sending out monthly energy usage reports, and they're claiming to see real reductions over time in usage for their users.

post #27 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by focher View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jukes View Post

 

Those are great features from a marketing perspective but it's not clear that they actually add up to anything concrete. If you're spending 25% less on heating/ac with the nest then I have to question if you had your programmable thermostat set up correctly or if you're exaggerating a little bit. I suppose the "away" feature would be useful if your house is frequently empty for extended periods of time.

 

Edit: I agree the Zigbee thing might matter for those who have other home automation things going, but they're also unlikely to be concerned about the extra $200 cost. I just seriously doubt that there's much utility to the nest for most people. I mainly have one because it's cool to have stuff that other people don't have.

I think you pretty much decided that the Nest is just a nice looking programmable thermostat, and wholly discount the intelligence it brings to the energy usage equation by incorporating a lot more data points beyond simply "set the temperature to X between this time and that time". I'm not suggesting it's perfect - for example, multiple Nests don't work together for efficiency sake and you're still stuck with out-of-balance AC/heating problems where the Nest's sensors aren't always where they should be to control the elements - but it's not just a nice looking thermostat.

 

Nest is also now sending out monthly energy usage reports, and they're claiming to see real reductions over time in usage for their users.

 

I'm just skeptical that the additional data points matter for most situations. I don't see how they could claim anything about real reductions with the amount of time that they've been available, it seems like you'd need historical data of at least a year to make any such statement. I also don't know how they'd be able to accurately compare with the performance of a simple programmable thermostat other than assuming that you've set the thermostat exactly like you set the nest and detecting when the single temperature data point would require heating/cooling, but the nest data points don't, and this wouldn't necessarily be applicable to someone who let the nest learn its own pattern.

 

Overall I'm simply saying buy one because it's pretty but don't expect it to do anything magic. If you want real reductions in cost then attack first-order issues like attic insulation, windows, or an inefficient HVAC system itself. The nest is more of a second or third order solution.

post #28 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by jukes View Post

 

Those are great features from a marketing perspective but it's not clear that they actually add up to anything concrete. If you're spending 25% less on heating/ac with the nest then I have to question if you had your programmable thermostat set up correctly or if you're exaggerating a little bit. I suppose the "away" feature would be useful if your house is frequently empty for extended periods of time.

 

Edit: I agree the Zigbee thing might matter for those who have other home automation things going, but they're also unlikely to be concerned about the extra $200 cost. I just seriously doubt that there's much utility to the nest for most people. I mainly have one because it's cool to have stuff that other people don't have.

Your overall comment doesn't make you appear to be very intelligent.

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post #29 of 54

It is nice to have a slick high-tech thermostat, however, getting your priorities straight should be the first step in home energy conservation, starting with insulation.

 

Sure the thermostat is only $250, but paying for itself in energy savings should not be the main goal. Long term savings are much more substantial with upgrading your doors and windows adding insulation, attic fans, servicing your furnace/AC unit, turning off lights when not needed, getting rid of the refrigerator in the garage, closing curtains, not leaving the TV on while no one is watching, etc.

 

I live in a mild climate but I almost never need any heating or cooling when my neighbors are using theirs. All because of the quality of the home construction. 

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post #30 of 54

Nest : Ordinary thermostats :: iPhone : feature phones

post #31 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Realistic View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jukes View Post

 

Those are great features from a marketing perspective but it's not clear that they actually add up to anything concrete. If you're spending 25% less on heating/ac with the nest then I have to question if you had your programmable thermostat set up correctly or if you're exaggerating a little bit. I suppose the "away" feature would be useful if your house is frequently empty for extended periods of time.

 

Edit: I agree the Zigbee thing might matter for those who have other home automation things going, but they're also unlikely to be concerned about the extra $200 cost. I just seriously doubt that there's much utility to the nest for most people. I mainly have one because it's cool to have stuff that other people don't have.

Your overall comment doesn't make you appear to be very intelligent.

 

Just trying to fit in.

post #32 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by jukes View Post
Just trying to fit in.

 

By… having things that others don't… 

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

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post #33 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jukes View Post
Just trying to fit in.

 

By… having things that others don't… 

 

Goes along with the whole unintelligent comments thing.

post #34 of 54
I have not read the details around this product, but this is nothing new there are other similar product which work with iOS such as X10 and Insteon to name two, the only difference if this product is just specific to the thermostat. It obviously know not to heat or cool your house based on the iphone's locate since it not in the house it know that so it tell the unit not to hear and cool, however, what happens when others live in your home and what about when multiple people live in the home who have iphones which one does it make it decision on. I personally think this will cost you more in frustration than is will actually save on energy cost. Plus the Insteon product allow you to simple while away form the house to reprogram the set point so you can turn it down or up as you need. Also it appears all information is sent through their website, again why would people want to share this information with an outside source, do you really want them to know you comings and going.
post #35 of 54

I don't have one yet, but I've read it doesn't have a simple hold feature. Is this true? What happens when your day is not routine?

post #36 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

I think it's such a huge marketing mistake for them to have that giant "72" (degrees) on the box and on all the product shots too.  They do ship these to Canada I think, and I'd be pretty gob-smacked if they didn't also do Celsius (It would actually be illegal to sell them in Canada if they didn't), but it's such a stupid move in terms of advertising their product to the rest of the world.  

 

USA is almost the only country on the planet that doesn't have Celsius now as the official temperature standard.  To advertise your product with a temperature that would read as deadly to the largest part of your potential audience is just dumb IMO.   

Started shipping in Canada yesterday, and the temps are in Celsius

post #37 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post
…however, what happens when others live in your home and what about when multiple people live in the home who have iPhones which one does it make it decision on. 

 

What do you mean? It's just like iCloud: any change made is applied in the order given, overwriting the last change.

 

Quote:
I personally think this will cost you more in frustration than is will actually save on energy cost. Plus the Insteon product allow you to simple while away form the house to reprogram the set point so you can turn it down or up as you need.

 

Trying to read this post was fairly frustrating. Can you please rewrite this last sentence? I'm not sure what you're saying, but I believe the Nest does it, too.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #38 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

It is nice to have a slick high-tech thermostat, however, getting your priorities straight should be the first step in home energy conservation, starting with insulation.

Sure the thermostat is only $250, but paying for itself in energy savings should not be the main goal. Long term savings are much more substantial with upgrading your doors and windows adding insulation, attic fans, servicing your furnace/AC unit, turning off lights when not needed, getting rid of the refrigerator in the garage, closing curtains, not leaving the TV on while no one is watching, etc.

I live in a mild climate but I almost never need any heating or cooling when my neighbors are using theirs. All because of the quality of the home construction. 

Yes, but it's trivial to replace a thermostat. It is generally not practical to change the quality of your home construction after it's built.

if the device pays for itself in a year or two, it's a good investment - even if there are other good investments, as well.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #39 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by amador_o View Post

I don't have one yet, but I've read it doesn't have a simple hold feature. Is this true? What happens when your day is not routine?

 

That would be a bummer. Maybe we can ask the guy who has some:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by focher View Post

I have 4 Nests in my house (4 zones) and we have them set to Celsius. Works fine.

 

Can you comment on whether they have or lack a hold feature? Thanks!

post #40 of 54

Perhaps someone with some knowledge of how this works could answer a really basic (perhaps dumb) question: what is involved in setting this up in a home with five different thermostats? 5 Nests + an electrician?

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