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Brightcove CEO expects Apple TV add-on for FaceTime, motion control - Page 2

post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


How long do the displays last? What is the resolution? What is the colour accuracy?

Displays usually last over 10 o 12 years, obviously depending on what technology is being used, but these days, they are always coming out with more enhanced displays, slimmer, more features, etc.  So, the average person will upgrade their TV about every 7 years.

 

Before 720p was common, now people are moving to 1080p.  Color accuracy?  There are many things people will look at other than color accuracy.

 

If you want a little more knowledge, might i suggest reading the better audio/video magazines that actually do a better job in reviewing products. Some of these magazines like Consumer Reports or other mags actually don't do a very good job in reviewing products.  Consumer Reports doesn't usually review the upper end of the range.  So, it depends on how much importance you have in video/audio.  Some TVs may do 2D well, but 3D not so well.  Some look OK in the store, but when you take them home, they might not perform like you expect.  Lighting conditions will alter how well the TV will perform and most of us don't have optimal lighting conditions, or room acoustics unless you have a dedicated home theater room that professionals have gone through to ensure optimal lighting and acoustics for optimal performance.  Some people quite frankly, don't really care.

 

Apple, life everyone, has to figure out what market they want to go after and what is considered to be high quality and what price range will yield enough sales to make it worthwhile going after that market.

 

I just hope if they do go after the TV market that they do their homework and really get some experts to assist them and they compare against the REAL high end but make them affordable.   Good luck!!  :-)

 

Magazines I found useful to read  Stereophile/Home Theater , The Absolute Sound/The Perfect Vision, and Secrets of Home Theater/Higher Fidelity are good sources for reviews.   They are usually reviewed by serious minded people and do fairly in depth reviews, but again, use them as a guide and resource for knowledge.   If you read a magazine review and the review is less than 4 pages long, that is usually a Press Release review and they are basically regurgitating the company's website and are superficial reviews.  Some of these magazines have their reviews on line.

post #42 of 50

I have already written about this idea about a month ago. Please see the details here: 

 

http://www.quora.com/Apple-TV/What-would-be-the-coolest-things-to-do-with-Apple-TV-the-set-top-box-apart-from-the-iOS-and-App-Store

 

I have posted this question in Quora, and have also answered when I noticed that no one was answering it.

 

Now, my idea precedes (May 11, 2012) and also comes close to that CEO Of Brightcove's idea. What say?

post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

Displays usually last over 10 o 12 years, obviously depending on what technology is being used, but these days, they are always coming out with more enhanced displays, slimmer, more features, etc.  So, the average person will upgrade their TV about every 7 years.

I think SolipsismX was asking specifically about the OLED technology. I don't think the technology has been available for a decade, so any concerns of lifetime are an open question. He was also hinting that the colors fade unevenly over time, with OLED technology, blue is known to fade faster than green, and green is known to fade faster than red. Last I read, 30,000 hours is the half life of blue, which is pretty good in my opinion, but it must be compensated or else the fade is noticeable considerably before then.

The other concerns about OLED colors is because they are generally set up to exaggerate colors, making it less accurate and a more cartoony image. I think they can be dialed back with some adjustments.
Edited by JeffDM - 6/5/12 at 2:45pm
post #44 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Sick and tired of every analyst and their grandmother speculating about a bloody AppleTV or no TV. Stop the madness!

Huh? What analyst? It's the CEO of an Internet video provider.
I’d rather have a better product than a better price.
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I’d rather have a better product than a better price.
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post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Sick and tired of every analyst and their grandmother speculating about a bloody AppleTV or no TV. Stop the madness!

Huh? What analyst? It's the CEO of an Internet video provider.
I’d rather have a better product than a better price.
Reply
I’d rather have a better product than a better price.
Reply
post #46 of 50
I hope Apple comes out with a proper set top box. I'll pay a similar premium as with TiVo to get always-on access to the Apple TV UI without having to change inputs and to be able to play cable/sat or switch to Blu-ray at ease while using any HDTV size, shape or type.

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

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This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

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post #47 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

They have Apple TV, it's $99 and it works with any TV set. 

 

Don't be such a pedant.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

For those of you concerned.  LG just announced that their new OLED 55 inch TVs are going to be priced around $10,000.   I guess this is going to be the new high end for a 55 inch TV.

Pioneer's first 42" plasma cost $20,000, and their second, a 50", cost $25,000.
post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

Displays usually last over 10 o 12 years, obviously depending on what technology is being used, but these days, they are always coming out with more enhanced displays, slimmer, more features, etc.  So, the average person will upgrade their TV about every 7 years.

Before 720p was common, now people are moving to 1080p.  Color accuracy?  There are many things people will look at other than color accuracy.

If you want a little more knowledge, might i suggest reading the better audio/video magazines that actually do a better job in reviewing products. Some of these magazines like Consumer Reports or other mags actually don't do a very good job in reviewing products.  Consumer Reports doesn't usually review the upper end of the range.  So, it depends on how much importance you have in video/audio.  Some TVs may do 2D well, but 3D not so well.  Some look OK in the store, but when you take them home, they might not perform like you expect.  Lighting conditions will alter how well the TV will perform and most of us don't have optimal lighting conditions, or room acoustics unless you have a dedicated home theater room that professionals have gone through to ensure optimal lighting and acoustics for optimal performance.  Some people quite frankly, don't really care.

Apple, life everyone, has to figure out what market they want to go after and what is considered to be high quality and what price range will yield enough sales to make it worthwhile going after that market.

I just hope if they do go after the TV market that they do their homework and really get some experts to assist them and they compare against the REAL high end but make them affordable.   Good luck!!  :-)

Magazines I found useful to read  Stereophile/Home Theater , The Absolute Sound/The Perfect Vision, and Secrets of Home Theater/Higher Fidelity are good sources for reviews.   They are usually reviewed by serious minded people and do fairly in depth reviews, but again, use them as a guide and resource for knowledge.   If you read a magazine review and the review is less than 4 pages long, that is usually a Press Release review and they are basically regurgitating the company's website and are superficial reviews.  Some of these magazines have their reviews on line.

These things are rated in hours, from that we can get some idea of how many years. The average American watches Tv for over 5 hours a day. I don't know, offhand, if that's 7 days a week, or some other metric. But I would doubt if a first gen OLED Tv would last 10 to 12 years under that watching level. 20,000 hours is considered to be a minimum standard for displays used for Tv's and computer monitors, so I would imagine they would meet that standard, at least. In addition, OLED life is very dependent on brightness. The brighter it's turned up, the shorter the lifetime. Without knowing the percentage of brightness these things are rated at, it's tough to tell what the actual lifetime vs the rated lifetime they will have.

As for color and contrast, I saw the Sony 11" model, and have seen most others at trade shows. So far, all have tended to have too much contrast, with shadows blocked up, and much too much saturation, like Tv's seen at most stores, where flesh tones are more orange, than pink.

As Tv's usually offer saturation controls and contrast controls, I would hope it could be turned down, but it doesn't explain why they are set that way in a trade show, where most people do know what they're looking at, vs consumers, who rarely do.

When one is actually released for sale, we'll see.
post #50 of 50
It's all right on and good thinking. Here's my hesitation: With the iPod and iPhone, a firehose of appealing content was necessary. And not just appealing, but cheap. And not just cheap but literally and specifically a buck. Why? Cus' a buck is an unarguably reasonable price for a given "unit" of media.

I think this argument can be made: No buck a tune, no iPod. But with the iPhone, Apple tripped and then quickly caught on that "computers for the rest of us" are not sufficient. Apple needed the help of thousands of app developers to succeed with the iPhone (much better, thinks Apple, than the help of one powerful partner like Adobe, as in the days of yore). True again: No buck an app, no iPhone.

The same holds for the Apple TV and I hope Apple does not once more presume it's all about its shiny sassy gadgets, perhaps with this difference: I own tunes and apps (mostly: I cannot sell them), but I'd settle for streamed access to shows and films and perhaps to time-limited access. After all, we aren't yet at the moment where tons of great shows can be produced cheaply by very creative persons sitting at computers or pianos. Shows and films are not yet a cottage industry. (Books are a cottage industry, so watch out below, publishers.) Nevertheless it's all about the buck: So no buck a show, no iMax.
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