or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › Genius Bar › Apple rumored to pay at least $150 for MacBook Pro Retina Display panels
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple rumored to pay at least $150 for MacBook Pro Retina Display panels

post #1 of 49
Thread Starter 
Competing notebook makers are reportedly looking to follow in Apple's footsteps by releasing their own high-resolution laptops, but pricing could pose a significant obstacle, as the Mac maker is rumored to pay at least $150 per unit for the Retina Display found in its MacBook Pro.

After Apple on Monday released a completely-redesigned 15-inch MacBook Pro with a 2,880-by-1,800-pixel Retina Display, sales of the laptop quickly took off, with the company's shipping estimates slipping to three to four weeks on Tuesday.

The early success of the MacBook Pro will likely come as a relief to display panel makers looking to increase profits by selling higher-resolution notebook screens. If, as it appears set to do, the Retina Display-equipped MacBook Pro becomes a hit, it could play a part in convincing other notebook makers to transition to higher-resolution panels.

Apple's role in the industry has sometimes been characterized as the one who tests the waters for new technologies and features while more risk-averse companies prefer to wait and see how Apple fares before following suit. For instance, the company has gradually been rolling out Retina Displays, its marketing term for screens with sufficiently dense resolutions for the pixels to be indistinguishable to the human eye from the standard viewing distance, across its line of products. The iPhone 4 was the first of Apple's products to bear the Retina Display moniker, followed by the iPod touch, the iPad and now the Macbook Pro.

MacBook Pro


Adding a Retina Display to the MacBook Pro doesn't appear to come cheap though, if a new report is to be believed. Taiwanese industry publication DigiTimes reported on Wednesday that, according to industry sources, the new display is likely to cost "above $150 per unit" from alleged suppliers Samsung and LG Display. By comparison, panel makers reportedly told the publication that the average price of 13- to 15-inch HD notebook panels is $40 to $45, while "Full HD IPS panels" supplied to Asustek are rumored to cost around $90 to $100 a unit.

Apple is definitely an early-mover in the high-resolution laptop space. According to the publication's research, less than 2 percent of global notebook panel shipments will have "resolution of Full HD or above" in the first half of this year. Those numbers are expected to change, however.

"Panel makers expect increasing demand for high resolution panels as non-Apple firms will likely follow suit in introducing similar products," the report read.
post #2 of 49
If the display is less than $200, then it kind of confirms why we haven't seen these screens earlier or on Windows PCs, OS support.
post #3 of 49

It makes sense that the cost would be high.  It probably took time to develop and mass produce the screens as well.  I would think in time the cost would begin to drop.  I have to see one of these machines.  Its gotta be incredible to look at.  Well done Apple.  How much do you wanna bet Steve had a hand in this design?

An Apple man since 1977
Reply
An Apple man since 1977
Reply
post #4 of 49
Although I did order a couple of these new laptops, I really can't see the retina thing catching on with windows machines quickly; windows users in my experiance are generally looking for the lowest cost Walmart computer on the market. Until PC manufacturers can change the bargin basement brainwave pc users shop with; this will be another piece of the market strictly for Apple.
post #5 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylerk36 View Post

It makes sense that the cost would be high.  It probably took time to develop and mass produce the screens as well.  I would think in time the cost would begin to drop.  I have to see one of these machines.  Its gotta be incredible to look at.  Well done Apple.  How much do you wanna bet Steve had a hand in this design?

Plus... Apple's not buying these screens in the same volume as say, the iPad's screen.

Apple buys iPad screens by the tens of millions.

Hopefully, as the price goes down, they will offer a Retina display across the entire Macbook line.
post #6 of 49

First off, it doesn't surprise me.  Second off, what does that matter.  Third, i can't wait to see one in person. Forth, I hope to someday own one or maybe a 17inch if they can come out with one. (i honestly think they might do it, because i think the professional crowd might request it enough to warrant making it)  Apple never said they weren't going to make one and it makes sense that these types of screens take time to get the technology to the point where they can offer the larger panels at a price  point to where it is within reason to buy the finished product.

 

Go Apple, keep on bringing better designed products, just get the iMacs, MacMinis, MacPros and the other products continually getting better.

 

I could actually see Apple coming out with a 17inch model with up to 32GB of RAM and up to 1TB of SSD storage for under $5,000 and they'd still sell a bunch of them.

post #7 of 49
Worth. Every. Penny.
If you value privacy you can now set DuckDuckGo as your default search engine in iOS and OS X.
Reply
If you value privacy you can now set DuckDuckGo as your default search engine in iOS and OS X.
Reply
post #8 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post


Plus... Apple's not buying these screens in the same volume as say, the iPad's screen.
Apple buys iPad screens by the tens of millions.
Hopefully, as the price goes down, they will offer a Retina display across the entire Macbook line.

I can eventually see this going throughout the entire product line in a few more years.  But, they have to put a more expensive graphics chip inside which draws power, takes up room, etc.  So, I don't know if they can do it in a MBAir.

 

Either way, great product.

 

On a side note and some will disagree with me and it is usually a price issue only.  I think Apple has the additional 8GB memory soldered on the motherboard, so it is better to do a BTO fully loaded for long term usage.  Now, I don't have confirmation on this, but if this is true, I think it might be the best.  Here's why.  I have owned Apple products throughout the years and one thing that I can say about Apple memory vs third party memory.   I have had ZERO problems with ALL of the Apple branded memory PERIOD, but with third party memory, mfg vary, i have had problems.  And for some stupid reason, when I have had problems, new memory sent didn't always work.  I don't know why other than I think that a lot of the memory suppliers don't really ensure that their memory really passes all of the memory tests as well as they should when they put them in these million dollar testing systems.  So, what might appear as a cost savings by going with third party memory, I can only suggest Kingston.   Just my personal experience and observations.  They might pass, but only to the point where they work.  I have heard good things about the reliability and compatibility of Kingston, but not other mfg.  Plus, if you get the AppleCare Warranty, Apple will just swap out the motherboard IF in fact, the memory is soldered in.

 

I hope someone can verify if Apple solders the additional memory on these units, if in fact that's the case because the picture of the interior doesn't seem to show any memory slot that I can tell.  Correct me if I am wrong.

post #9 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post


Plus... Apple's not buying these screens in the same volume as say, the iPad's screen.
Apple buys iPad screens by the tens of millions.
Hopefully, as the price goes down, they will offer a Retina display across the entire Macbook line.

 

They may be purchasing more of them, but the ipad retina screen is much higher pixel density than this new mac screen.
Household: MacBook, iPad 16gb wifi, iPad 64gb wifi, iPad Mini 32gb, coming iPhone 5S, iPhone 4S 32gb, iPhone 32gb, iPod Touch 4th gen x1, iPod nano 16gb gen 5 x2, iPod nano gen 3 8gb, iPod classic...
Reply
Household: MacBook, iPad 16gb wifi, iPad 64gb wifi, iPad Mini 32gb, coming iPhone 5S, iPhone 4S 32gb, iPhone 32gb, iPod Touch 4th gen x1, iPod nano 16gb gen 5 x2, iPod nano gen 3 8gb, iPod classic...
Reply
post #10 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post


Plus... Apple's not buying these screens in the same volume as say, the iPad's screen.
Apple buys iPad screens by the tens of millions.
Hopefully, as the price goes down, they will offer a Retina display across the entire Macbook line.

With the looks of the lead time going from 2-3 weeks early this morning to 4-5 weeks this afternoon, this product actually might sell as well as the iPad.  Don't be surprised if a lot of corporations start buying this thing.  It is looks like a MAJOR home run.  I mean, the base model plus 8G additional ram, is pretty much a unit I think most will use.  It is just a really slick product even PC users will actually take very seriously.  I don't normally do this, but I think Apple engineering did a stellar job.  The only area is cost of SSD drives and memory and ability to only put 16G instead of 32G.   I think ProTools users will go for a 17inch version with 32G of memory because they have the native version of ProTools and they need the additional real estate.  Other than that. I think it is pretty much as perfect as they can get with this. I think they were right in putting in two Thunderbolt instead of one ethernet.  HDMI, great addition.

post #11 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

With the looks of the lead time going from 2-3 weeks early this morning to 4-5 weeks this afternoon, this product actually might sell as well as the iPad.  Don't be surprised if a lot of corporations start buying this thing.  It is looks like a MAJOR home run.  I mean, the base model plus 8G additional ram, is pretty much a unit I think most will use.  It is just a really slick product even PC users will actually take very seriously.  I don't normally do this, but I think Apple engineering did a stellar job.  The only area is cost of SSD drives and memory and ability to only put 16G instead of 32G.   I think ProTools users will go for a 17inch version with 32G of memory because they have the native version of ProTools and they need the additional real estate.  Other than that. I think it is pretty much as perfect as they can get with this. I think they were right in putting in two Thunderbolt instead of one ethernet.  HDMI, great addition.

Hmmmm.... maybe. The lead time is interesting.

But don't forget... Apple only sold 4 million Macs last quarter... and that's ALL Macs combined.... Air, MBP, iMac, Mini and Pro. Who knows if this new Macbook Pro will be the breakout volume seller... possibly indicated by the increased lead time.

I don't know what corporate IT budgets look like these days... but $2,200 is still a high price to pay for a single laptop (even if it's amazing).

I hope you're right though... so Apple will expand their line of laptops to all be thinner, optical-less, with SSD and Retina. It's definitely the direction to go.

Corporate Mac use has been on the rise lately... this may give it even more of a boost.
post #12 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycomiko View Post

They may be purchasing more of them, but the ipad retina screen is much higher pixel density than this new mac screen.

Good point.

The iPad screen is very pixel dense... but a 15" screen has more than twice the area of the iPad screen.

375
post #13 of 49
Pretty much sums it up!
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

First off, it doesn't surprise me.  Second off, what does that matter.  Third, i can't wait to see one in person. Forth, I hope to someday own one or maybe a 17inch if they can come out with one.
I'd love to see one myself. As to a 17", I have mixed feelings. However as I get older those bigger screens become more appealing.
Quote:
(i honestly think they might do it, because i think the professional crowd might request it enough to warrant making it)  Apple never said they weren't going to make one and it makes sense that these types of screens take time to get the technology to the point where they can offer the larger panels at a price  point to where it is within reason to buy the finished product.
This release is a classic example of a new technology ramp up. Focus on one niche in the product line and make sure to cover your A$$ with similar older tech. There is alway the chance or potential for glitches during such ramp ups.
Quote:
Go Apple, keep on bringing better designed products, just get the iMacs, MacMinis, MacPros and the other products continually getting better.
Well the lack of interest in the desktop market has left a sour taste in my mouth. Apple better have something new for the desktop by the time Mountain Lion ships or my respect for the company will dip to a new low.
Quote:
I could actually see Apple coming out with a 17inch model with up to 32GB of RAM and up to 1TB of SSD storage for under $5,000 and they'd still sell a bunch of them.

Every product has its pricing limit. $5000 is to much for a base 17" laptop no matter how good the screen. My biggest disappointment with the retina machine is the lack of room for a bulk storage device to supplement the SSD. A 17" retina machine might solve that problem.
post #14 of 49
I'm not surprised at all and would suggest that the actual cost is closer to $200. Combine that with a state of the art GPU and you have a good portion of this laptops price explained. I still believe this laptop to be one of the best bargains Apple has ever offered for sale.

It is interesting that lead times have already passed a month. It sounds like Apple underestimated the appeal of the machine, they could be back logged all year. This will be another home run in the same way iPad is.

The technical side of me can't wait for a teardown of this machine. I want to see all the design trade offs Then I want to see benchmarks and testing of the units under load to see how they do thermally. My only real concern is that the units will thermally throttle too Agressively.

Te only thing that really bothers me about WWDC and this debut is the lack of love for the desktop. Hopefully that is corrected before Mountain Lion debuts.
post #15 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycomiko View Post

 

They may be purchasing more of them, but the ipad retina screen is much higher pixel density than this new mac screen.


264 v. 220 ppi. Much higher? Depends on what you mean by "much higher". But the ppi spec does not stand alone. You need to take into account the different distances at which one would use these devices.

post #16 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Pretty much sums it up!
Every product has its pricing limit. $5000 is to much for a base 17" laptop no matter how good the screen. My biggest disappointment with the retina machine is the lack of room for a bulk storage device to supplement the SSD. A 17" retina machine might solve that problem.


A fully loaded 15" MacBook Pro now approaches $4k.

 

But let me understand this - a 17" machine might solve the problem of supplementary bulk storage?

post #17 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post


Good point.
The iPad screen is very pixel dense... but a 15" screen has more than twice the area of the iPad screen.
375

Yes but only 65% more pixels.

post #18 of 49

This new macbook pro is going to take the market by storm, both in business and with consumers.

 

Other manufacturers will not be able to come out with a similar product anytime soon. You have to realize that major changes in the OS and software have to also be made for such a machine to function. If you just put a retina display on a Windows laptop, the whole gui will just shrink and essentially be unusable. I once had a 15.4" laptop with 1920 x 1200 pixels and that caused alot of squinting and looking up really close. It was kind of ok because I was younger then but probably not healthy. A retina display is 2880 x 1800 which is out of the question unless the OS handles it properly, essentially doubling in size anything that isn't designed for retina.

 

This means that Windows manufacturers have to wait for Microsoft to come out with an OS that can handle the retina experience. Unless they've been working on it within Windows 8, this isn't going to happen in the next years. Apple will then have this market all to itself for a long time and may even patent a bunch of stuff on the way. First movers must be rewarded for innovation to continue.

 

I'm seeing Mac sales doubling over the next year as more retina displays populate their product line.

post #19 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonshf View Post

This new macbook pro is going to take the market by storm, both in business and with consumers.

 

This means that Windows manufacturers have to wait for Microsoft to come out with an OS that can handle the retina experience. Unless they've been working on it within Windows 8, this isn't going to happen in the next years. Apple will then have this market all to itself for a long time and may even patent a bunch of stuff on the way. First movers must be rewarded for innovation to continue.

 

I'm seeing Mac sales doubling over the next year as more retina displays populate their product line.

 

Tried the dpi settings on windows 7 ? It's not flawless but it works.

 

I do not see this new macbook pro taking the business market by storm, as business have other demands, like physical ethernet connections, removable memory/storage, and in most cases a requirement for windows within their complete infrastructure.

post #20 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by mausz View Post

Tried the dpi settings on windows 7 ? It's not flawless but it works.

Really? Which Windows 7 machine do you have which supports the same DPI as the MBP Retina? (Hint - there isn't one). Or are you talking about running Windows 7 in Boot Camp? If so, you just negated your argument below.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mausz View Post

I do not see this new macbook pro taking the business market by storm, as business have other demands, like physical ethernet connections, removable memory/storage, and in most cases a requirement for windows within their complete infrastructure.

Physical ethernet? A cheap adapter - which you leave connected to the Ethernet cable. When you come into the office, it doesn't matter whether you plug a cable into the Ethernet port or into the TB port - it's still one connection.

Removable storage? I think you're confused as to how modern business works. Very few businesses require this and many even forbid removable storage devices for security reasons. Even if you need it, it's a simple external connector.

Windows? Piece of cake. For $60 extra (plus the Windows site license which you probably already have), you can run it in Fusion or Parallels (or for free with other VMs or Boot Camp. The cost of being able to run both Windows and Mac apps is pretty small compared to the cost of the computer - and more importantly, compared to the cost of the people who are running the computer. If you add even incrementally to their capabilities or efficiencies, it pays for that difference many times over.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #21 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Really? Which Windows 7 machine do you have which supports the same DPI as the MBP Retina? (Hint - there isn't one). Or are you talking about running Windows 7 in Boot Camp? If so, you just negated your argument below.
Physical ethernet? A cheap adapter - which you leave connected to the Ethernet cable. When you come into the office, it doesn't matter whether you plug a cable into the Ethernet port or into the TB port - it's still one connection.
Removable storage? I think you're confused as to how modern business works. Very few businesses require this and many even forbid removable storage devices for security reasons. Even if you need it, it's a simple external connector.
Windows? Piece of cake. For $60 extra (plus the Windows site license which you probably already have), you can run it in Fusion or Parallels (or for free with other VMs or Boot Camp. The cost of being able to run both Windows and Mac apps is pretty small compared to the cost of the computer - and more importantly, compared to the cost of the people who are running the computer. If you add even incrementally to their capabilities or efficiencies, it pays for that difference many times over.

 

One of my colleagues is using a 27" 2560x1600 monitor with dpi setting to 110%, and it works quite well...

 

Businesses do not like adapters (which should have been free...). They get lost/stolen, in any case, they are never around when you need them.

 

Removable storage was the wrong term used by me... I meant that business would like to be able to do simple hardware support themselves. If a hdd/ssd dies, they want to replace it, re-image it and have the employee working again within minutes, same for RAM and maybe even battery. Hardware needs to be servicable to a certain extent....

post #22 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

I can eventually see this going throughout the entire product line in a few more years.  But, they have to put a more expensive graphics chip inside which draws power, takes up room, etc.  So, I don't know if they can do it in a MBAir.

The new Intel Ivy Bridge CPUs have integrated graphics that handle 4K displays. The graphics chips are not the problem.

post #23 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Physical ethernet? A cheap adapter - which you leave connected to the Ethernet cable. When you come into the office, it doesn't matter whether you plug a cable into the Ethernet port or into the TB port - it's still one connection.

 

Rather short sighted comment. Adapters of either kind, wired or wireless are not allowed here period, and I know this office isn't the only one. Simply for security reasons, and MAC address enforcement. 

I'm not a pessimist. I'm an optimist, with experience.
Reply
I'm not a pessimist. I'm an optimist, with experience.
Reply
post #24 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

 

On a side note and some will disagree with me and it is usually a price issue only.  I think Apple has the additional 8GB memory soldered on the motherboard, so it is better to do a BTO fully loaded for long term usage.  Now, I don't have confirmation on this, but if this is true, I think it might be the best. 

 

On the thinner models like the Air, yes, all the RAM is soldered to the board. So you can't upgrade the memory after purchased. That's why it's labeled 'onboard memory'. 

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #25 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post


A fully loaded 15" MacBook Pro now approaches $4k.

 

But let me understand this - a 17" machine might solve the problem of supplementary bulk storage?

 

Nope. Because these are SSD and they have a max available capacity of 512GB at the moment. The best you could perhaps do is put in a second one if the larger body gives you enough room. However every pro out there is going to need like 10 times that amount of data at their hands so there will be a storage server, or at least mini rack, in play. 

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #26 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonshf View Post

This new macbook pro is going to take the market by storm, both in business and with consumers.

Other manufacturers will not be able to come out with a similar product anytime soon. You have to realize that major changes in the OS and software have to also be made for such a machine to function. If you just put a retina display on a Windows laptop, the whole gui will just shrink and essentially be unusable. I once had a 15.4" laptop with 1920 x 1200 pixels and that caused alot of squinting and looking up really close. It was kind of ok because I was younger then but probably not healthy. A retina display is 2880 x 1800 which is out of the question unless the OS handles it properly, essentially doubling in size anything that isn't designed for retina.

This means that Windows manufacturers have to wait for Microsoft to come out with an OS that can handle the retina experience. Unless they've been working on it within Windows 8, this isn't going to happen in the next years. Apple will then have this market all to itself for a long time and may even patent a bunch of stuff on the way. First movers must be rewarded for innovation to continue.

I'm seeing Mac sales doubling over the next year as more retina displays populate their product line.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mausz View Post

Tried the dpi settings on windows 7 ? It's not flawless but it works.

I do not see this new macbook pro taking the business market by storm, as business have other demands, like physical ethernet connections, removable memory/storage, and in most cases a requirement for windows within their complete infrastructure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Really? Which Windows 7 machine do you have which supports the same DPI as the MBP Retina? (Hint - there isn't one). Or are you talking about running Windows 7 in Boot Camp? If so, you just negated your argument below.
Physical ethernet? A cheap adapter - which you leave connected to the Ethernet cable. When you come into the office, it doesn't matter whether you plug a cable into the Ethernet port or into the TB port - it's still one connection.
Removable storage? I think you're confused as to how modern business works. Very few businesses require this and many even forbid removable storage devices for security reasons. Even if you need it, it's a simple external connector.
Windows? Piece of cake. For $60 extra (plus the Windows site license which you probably already have), you can run it in Fusion or Parallels (or for free with other VMs or Boot Camp. The cost of being able to run both Windows and Mac apps is pretty small compared to the cost of the computer - and more importantly, compared to the cost of the people who are running the computer. If you add even incrementally to their capabilities or efficiencies, it pays for that difference many times over.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mausz View Post

One of my colleagues is using a 27" 2560x1600 monitor with dpi setting to 110%, and it works quite well...

Businesses do not like adapters (which should have been free...). They get lost/stolen, in any case, they are never around when you need them.

Removable storage was the wrong term used by me... I meant that business would like to be able to do simple hardware support themselves. If a hdd/ssd dies, they want to replace it, re-image it and have the employee working again within minutes, same for RAM and maybe even battery. Hardware needs to be servicable to a certain extent....

MacBook Pro with Retina Display will not be popular for business outside of the creative professionals market. The primary criteria for most businesses is perceived cost which is quite high for the MacBook Pro with Retina Display. Most businesses have absolutely no need for Retina Displays and are generally unwilling to pay for SSD storage as well. Furthermore, business Information Technology groups will not like the inability to replace parts themselves nor are most Information Technology groups knowledgeable about Apple support. I further submit that Information Technology professionals in many instances have a dislike for Apple due to an elitist attitude of superiority they gain from having obscure knowledge about competitors to Apple OS X.
post #27 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by mausz View Post

I do not see this new macbook pro taking the business market by storm, as business have other demands, like physical ethernet connections, removable memory/storage, and in most cases a requirement for windows within their complete infrastructure.

 

I think you will find that if you actually talked to many businesses that would find this laptop appealing, no we aren't worried about such things. We have no issue with the whole thunderbolt to ethernet adapter, we don't care to do our own repairs and upgrades and Windows are those things that let us look outside from time to time. We also have no issue with maxing out our CTO, buying Apple Care and even that whole Joint Venture thing. This is all a business expense so we write it off in the end. 

 

Nor will the businesses that don't really need this laptop but get it to look hip and modern and with the times care about any of that stuff because Apple covered all the issues with their adapters etc. By the time the laptop comes in a month all those pieces will be out and folks will adapt as needed. 

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #28 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

With the looks of the lead time going from 2-3 weeks early this morning to 4-5 weeks this afternoon, this product actually might sell as well as the iPad.  

 

I wouldn't say that based on just the lead time. Truth is that that time might have gone up because Apple isn't producing these units hand over fist. probably more like 1/10th the amount of iPads being produced. Lower stock means shipping times go up. But it doesn't tell us the number of units that were available. 

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #29 of 49
(deleted... Someon beat me to it.)
post #30 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

I think you will find that if you actually talked to many businesses that would find this laptop appealing, no we aren't worried about such things. We have no issue with the whole thunderbolt to ethernet adapter, we don't care to do our own repairs and upgrades and Windows are those things that let us look outside from time to time. We also have no issue with maxing out our CTO, buying Apple Care and even that whole Joint Venture thing. This is all a business expense so we write it off in the end. 

Nor will the businesses that don't really need this laptop but get it to look hip and modern and with the times care about any of that stuff because Apple covered all the issues with their adapters etc. By the time the laptop comes in a month all those pieces will be out and folks will adapt as needed. 

???

To which businesses are you referring?

The Fortune 1000 didn't become some of the largest companies in the world by purchasing products and services they don't need. The MacBook Pro with Retina Display is a niche product for creative professionals. I just can't envision an accounting professional at General Electric needing a MacBook Pro with Retina Display.
post #31 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

]

MacBook Pro with Retina Display will not be popular for business outside of the creative professionals market. The primary criteria for most businesses is perceived cost which is quite high for the MacBook Pro with Retina Display. Most businesses have absolutely no need for Retina Displays and are generally unwilling to pay for SSD storage as well. Furthermore, business Information Technology groups will not like the inability to replace parts themselves nor are most Information Technology groups knowledgeable about Apple support. I further submit that Information Technology professionals in many instances have a dislike for Apple due to an elitist attitude of superiority they gain from having obscure knowledge about competitors to Apple OS X.

The technicians might not want it, but that is the CEO might push for lower TCO by not doing on-site repairs. At some point, complete spare devices are easier to support than parts.

I would say the price to entry is a little on the high side today, and the lack of a builtin Ethernet port means that many companies would need users to VPN into the network, which can have significant licensing costs as well.
post #32 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by mausz View Post

 

One of my colleagues is using a 27" 2560x1600 monitor with dpi setting to 110%, and it works quite well...

 

Businesses do not like adapters (which should have been free...). They get lost/stolen, in any case, they are never around when you need them.

 

Removable storage was the wrong term used by me... I meant that business would like to be able to do simple hardware support themselves. If a hdd/ssd dies, they want to replace it, re-image it and have the employee working again within minutes, same for RAM and maybe even battery. Hardware needs to be servicable to a certain extent....

Are you all really, actually referring to the dpi settings in Windows as a solution to a retina display? If I recall, the dpi settings only change font sizes in things like window titles and menus. Image sizes aren't changed and font sizes inside applications aren't changed. The retina display is a completely different animal and will require different tools to tame it.

 

As to the thunderbolt/ethernet connection, I think these things will have a way of figuring themselves out. Most likely, you will plug your laptop to a thunderbolt hub which will connect to the ethernet, an extra display and whatever else, all at full speed.

 

I think it's true (as some people have indicated) that most businesses won't have any real need for a retina display. Nevertheless, when Apple has converted all the Macs and displays to retina resolutions (probably within a year from now), it will be the new standard to judge by. Retina iPads aren't really needed by most either but businesses and consumers are still buying them en masse.

post #33 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

...this product actually might sell as well as the iPad.

 

No. That's not going to happen.

 

But here's what probably will happen:

 

1. Apple will be able to get a sense for how much people want this on their laptops. (Probably a lot!)

2. They'll make and sell enough for suppliers to continue working out manufacturing kinks, improving yields and reducing costs, which will lead to:

3. Apple expands the use of Retina displays through the product line into higher volume laptops (13" for example). Got to step 2.

 

Next thing you know Retina displays are old news and just expected.

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply

The state is nothing more than a criminal gang writ large.

Reply
post #34 of 49

The MacBook Pro with Retina Display is the next iteration of notebooks fully replacing desktop computers in the Mac line. One of the last bastions for Mac desktops is for creative professionals, and this machine is definitely powerful enough to fulfill the needs for a significant portion of that segment. Everything you see in this machine will filter down to the other models.

 

Yeah, it's a niche machine. Just like Ferraris are niche cars. I would like one of each.

post #35 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

 

On the thinner models like the Air, yes, all the RAM is soldered to the board. So you can't upgrade the memory after purchased. That's why it's labeled 'onboard memory'. 

 

The RAM on the MB Pro 15 w/Retina is confirmed as soldered. It's not upgradeable. From an engineering standpoint, upgradeable components take more space. The slots and the physical space around them necessary to support that design would not allow for the thinness of these machines.

post #36 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post


MacBook Pro with Retina Display will not be popular for business outside of the creative professionals market. The primary criteria for most businesses is perceived cost which is quite high for the MacBook Pro with Retina Display. Most businesses have absolutely no need for Retina Displays and are generally unwilling to pay for SSD storage as well. Furthermore, business Information Technology groups will not like the inability to replace parts themselves nor are most Information Technology groups knowledgeable about Apple support. I further submit that Information Technology professionals in many instances have a dislike for Apple due to an elitist attitude of superiority they gain from having obscure knowledge about competitors to Apple OS X.

I guess these are the reasons why Apple has been making such advances in the business world ;)   They are making IT, and their old ideas about the way things should be done, less important by making simpler, more durable solutions for computing.

post #37 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by focher View Post

The MacBook Pro with Retina Display is the next iteration of notebooks fully replacing desktop computers in the Mac line. One of the last bastions for Mac desktops is for creative professionals, and this machine is definitely powerful enough to fulfill the needs for a significant portion of that segment. Everything you see in this machine will filter down to the other models.

 

Yeah, it's a niche machine. Just like Ferraris are niche cars. I would like one of each.

Notebooks will never completely displace desktop computers. Some people (like me) have no reason to carry around a notebook and just want a simple large screen desktop (like an iMac). The iMacs are still selling well and no reason to discontinue.

 

The Macbook Pro with retina display is the first step to putting retina displays on all Mac products, including the laptops, the iMacs and the standalone displays.

 

Retina displays will end up on all Apple products, from iPods to Macs and perhaps eventually the fabled TV.

post #38 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaarrrgggh View Post

The technicians might not want it, but that is the CEO might push for lower TCO by not doing on-site repairs. At some point, complete spare devices are easier to support than parts.
I would say the price to entry is a little on the high side today, and the lack of a builtin Ethernet port means that many companies would need users to VPN into the network, which can have significant licensing costs as well.

No. The CIO will have a subordinate perform an analysis of cost to benefit ratio (among other analyses) for adoption of the Mac platform. The cost of replacing infrastructure is too expensive initially and will be countered with the argument that "if you are going to just install Microsoft Windows on a Mac anyway, why not buy a Microsoft Windows PC." That argument is exceedingly effective against a large segment of the population. Furthermore, many companies are driven by quarterly reports which would be very poor during a mass adoption of the Mac platform.

Please understand that while you and I understand the benefits, a large segment of enterprise Information Technology professionals hate Apple.

It took me years to convert the local Information Technology manager at the last company at which I was employed. He eventually came to appreciate my knowledge and began to appreciate the reasons I preferred the iPhone. Once he used an iPhone it was simply a matter of time until he adopted the Mac but his subordinates knew Apple would jeopardize their jobs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanyc1 View Post

I guess these are the reasons why Apple has been making such advances in the business world 1wink.gif   They are making IT, and their old ideas about the way things should be done, less important by making simpler, more durable solutions for computing.

Apple's advances in enterprise Information Technology are largely limited to the iPad and iPhone. Furthermore, my argument is solely against mass adoption of the MacBook Pro with Retina Display by enterprises. I can't think of a single reason an accounting professional needs a MacBook Pro with Retina Display. The MacBook Air is an entirely different story.
Edited by MacBook Pro - 6/13/12 at 9:55am
post #39 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonshf View Post

Notebooks will never completely displace desktop computers.

But desktops will completely replace laptops. Thanks to tablets.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #40 of 49
Quote:
After Apple on Monday released a completely-redesigned 15-inch MacBook Pro with a 2,880-by-1,880-pixel Retina Display

 

The resolution is 2880 by 1800 (double the previous default 1440 by 900), not 1880.  See Apple's site for confirmation:

 

http://www.apple.com/macbook-pro/features/

 

Quote:
When you pack over 5 million pixels into a 15.4-inch display, the results are positively stunning. The pixel density is so high, your eyes can’t discern individual pixels. Images take on a new level of realism and text is pin sharp. And with a 2880-by-1800 resolution, you can see more of your high-resolution images onscreen with pixel-for-pixel accuracy. So your best ideas can become your best work.

 

This mistake was included in the original Apple Insider writeup and continue to be reproduced.  Can someone at Apple Insider fix it?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Genius Bar
AppleInsider › Forums › General › Genius Bar › Apple rumored to pay at least $150 for MacBook Pro Retina Display panels