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First look: Apple's next-gen MacBook Pro with 15" Retina display - Page 2

post #41 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by agramonte View Post

 

you know you can just buy an SSD and put it in a legacy MacBook Pro. Also a 500gig hybrid is 100 buck.

eh.. the 500GB Momentus XT wasn't that great.  I have a 1 month old 750gb one that is much better than the 500... at least its noticeably faster than a standard hard drive, but its still pretty slow next to a decent SSD.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MyDogHasFleas View Post

FedEx delivered mine this morning, ordered on Monday from Apple Store.

uhhhggg.... i ordered mine monday too, and they didn't get it ready for shipment until 7am Friday in Shanghai, then FedEx sat around and waited and didn't pick it up til 12 hours later.... and it missed the Friday night flight out.  At least FedEx flies out on Saturday too, so it won't wait til monday.  I paid an extra $15 for faster shipping and they send me an email on the 15th that its shipped and should arrive on the 20th.  Yeah thats really faster than the 5 day free shipping!!!!

 

EDIT: ok maybe it didn't take them 12 hours.. I figure out that FedEx tracking, each scan line is local scan time with no display of what time zone its talking about, so the original line was in the US and the other in China, even though it gives you no indication of that.


Edited by doh123 - 6/15/12 at 12:36pm
post #42 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I think that's the first generation. The second generation does make some nice improvements, but it might still not be enough for you. It does boot and load apps a lot closer to SSD times than HDD times.
http://www.anandtech.com/show/5160/seagate-2nd-generation-momentus-xt-750gb-hybrid-hdd-review/1

Review the graphs in that article. The difference isn't really all that great.

Notice the immense discrepancy between performance on different tests. Some of the tests show the hybrid drive to be very close to the SSD in performance. Others (like Anand's Storage Bench test) show it to be far behind. In my experience, the real life performance is much closer to Anand's Storage Bench test - even the hybrid drive doesn't come close to SSD performance, and the improvement over existing hard drives is modest.

Note that the 'boot time' and 'app loading time' tests are easy to spoof - and I suspect that's why the real life results are far different than the results (boot time and app loading time, mostly) that Seagate uses. If you load the same app multiple times in a row, it will be in NAND. If you simply boot to OS, then quit, then boot again, the OS will be in NAND (you might have to repeat it a few times depending on their caching algorithm. But that's not the way most people work.
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post #43 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by doh123 View Post

eh.. the 500GB Momentus XT wasn't that great.  I have a 1 month old 750gb one that is much better than the 500... at least its noticeably faster than a standard hard drive, but its still pretty slow next to a decent SSD.

uhhhggg.... i ordered mine monday too, and they didn't get it ready for shipment until 7am Friday in Shanghai, then FedEx sat around and waited and didn't pick it up til 12 hours later.... and it missed the Friday night flight out.  At least FedEx flies out on Saturday too, so it won't wait til monday.  I paid an extra $15 for faster shipping and they send me an email on the 15th that its shipped and should arrive on the 20th.  Yeah thats really faster than the 5 day free shipping!!!!

 

EDIT: ok maybe it didn't take them 12 hours.. I figure out that FedEx tracking, each scan line is local scan time with no display of what time zone its talking about, so the original line was in the US and the other in China, even though it gives you no indication of that.

 

doh123, when on Monday did you order?  I ordered around 6:30PM and it says 7-10 business days until it ships on the site.  Still processing.

post #44 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

The 'retina' display is superb and even though the actual desktop space is equivalent to 1440x900 you can view and edit 1080p video in full resolution but it only consumes 2/3 of the display width whereas it doesn't even fit onto a 1680x1050 screen.  The same case is made for image manipulation.  

 

So although you have a workspace of 1440x900 it enables full scale viewing of media etc.  If you work with any image based media or just want a screen you can work with for long periods of time with reduced eye strain then there is no better solution in a laptop.

 

I agree. I think the same applies to building ipad and iphone retina apps too (on a non-retina macbook pro as you have to downscale the simulator). My 1440 x 900 macbook pro is fine for developing iphone and ipad apps (non-retina) - the new retina macbook pro will be more than fine for making retina iphone & ipad apps. I'd argue it's ordinary non-power users that more likely need the extra working space of a non-retina mbp. Especially once third party apps take advantage of the retina display.

post #45 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

That looks like a serial number if I am not mistaken.  The model number should have an M with an ending of LL/A.

It's the SEAGATE number:

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?client=safari&rls=en&q=ST95005620AS&oe=UTF-8&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=4651654425906449103&sa=X&ei=r5_bT-PYDu6I6AHKmKCpCw&ved=0CHIQ8wIwAA#ps-sellers

post #46 of 129
With the following configuration:
2.6GHz Quad-core Intel Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 3.6GHz
16GB 1600MHz DDR3L SDRAM
512GB Flash Storage
Apple Thunderbolt to Gigabit Ethernet Adapter
Backlit Keyboard (English) & User's Guide
Accessory Kit
post #47 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by dvdkid919 View Post

 

doh123, when on Monday did you order?  I ordered around 6:30PM and it says 7-10 business days until it ships on the site.  Still processing.

I ordered it monday about 3:30 central, 1:30 pacific, and it says 5 to 7 days at that point.

I ordered the standard high end MBP-R with the ram bumped up to 16gb.  i didn't order extra stuff (dvd, adapters, etc) because I'm going to get a $100 'back to school gift card' which I'll use to get accessories later  :-)

post #48 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by KindredMac View Post

I played with one at the Apple Store in Albany, NY last night.

For graphics professionals this is a solid NO for a computer right now.

The pixel doubling makes everything that is non-Retina ready looks horrible.  Text in Illustrator and InDesign look so low res that it makes you think you are working on an old junky PC.

Engadget says the new one makes downsampled text slightly worse than the old one but a reviewer on ABC said that going back to the old one after using the new one was pretty bad too:

http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/apple-macbook-pro-retina-display-review/story?id=16561507#.T9uyImjjfi2

You can always use an external display until any issues are resolved and you'd probably want to anyway.
post #49 of 129

i ordered my RMBP on monday around 1pm pacific time. it is 2.3g with 16g memory. it said it would take 5-7 days and delivery will be between 6/22-25.

 

the order status changed from processing to prepare shipping by weds night and it was shipped out thursday morning and arrived at memphis TN yesterday night. and it arrived at oakland CA 4am today. fedex delivered it at 10am today.

post #50 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

From the pictures, aside from being slightly thinner, the "body"  really doesn't look any different to me than my several year old MacBook Pro, so I don't know how it can be called "beautiful and exquisite" with the implication that it's different than past machines.

 

I would have to agree with you, making it slightly thinner does not make it look any more "beautiful and exquisite" than the previous MBP.

 

Personally I think it just looks dull now. We've had the same basic silver colour for over 10 years and the same silver/black design for at least the past few years.

 

Why can't they come up with something new? An all black MBP would look amazing.

post #51 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

I would have to agree with you, making it slightly thinner does not make it look any more "beautiful and exquisite" than the previous MBP.

Personally I think it just looks dull now. We've had the same basic silver colour for over 10 years and the same silver/black design for at least the past few years.

Why can't they come up with something new? An all black MBP would look amazing.

Do it yourself if your ballzy enough.

Go get the aluminum reanodized! Black or what ever color you want!
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post #52 of 129

My understanding regarding the magsafe connector and the reasoning behind why it was changed back from an angled connector is because the point of magsafe was if someone tripped over the cable, it would disconnect easily. Tugging on the straight connector, the cable would dislodge away from the computer and disconnect easily. With the angled one, the cable would tug sideways on the laptop, possibly yanking from the tabletop.

 

Regarding the Retina MBP, I've been playing with it at the local store an it is a beauty. The display is crisp, the machine is FAST and snappy, it's noticeably thinner and lighter, and the sound from the speakers is significantly and noticeably improved. I personally wouldn't hesitate to get one and considering the cost of SS memory, the machine is actually quite reasonable. I'm envious of anyone who has their hands on one already.

 

One more thing, the glare on the surface of the screen is definitely significantly reduced compared to the glossy screen of the traditional MBP. I've always preferred the contrast and colours of the glossy screen but got the anti-glare because I often work in situations where reflections are a problem. I think this new screen is a nice balance between the two.

post #53 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by the cool gut View Post

 

Incorrect.  Pros where right angle well.  I think they switch because the cord on the right angle would be blocking the TB ports.

My mid-2010 MBPro has the right-angled MagSafe, just like my mid-2011 Air. The updated non-Retina MBPro still does, I believe.

 

I think most people, in attaching the right-angled plug, would trail the cord toward the back, so, no, it wouldn't obscure the Thunderbolt ports, or conflict with their cords.

 

If anything, the straight-on connector is more likely to tangle with those.

 

I like the right-angled connector because I most often am holding this on the couch, not at a desk, and since the cord & connector cleave to the profile of the machine, it is unlikely to rub off on the arm of the sofa unintentionally.

 

For my experience and use I see the new MagSafe 2 as a disadvantage...perhaps not to everyone's.

post #54 of 129

It's kind of confusing that the ports with little lighting bolts on them are *not* power connectors. I wonder how many people who don't know about Thunderbolt will be confused by that.

post #55 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloodstains View Post

When did Apple switch away from the right angle magsafe and why?

 

The cylindrical MagSafe adapters can tug the machine pretty easily. If you pull parallel to the left edge (basically just tug the cord straight along the direction of the cylinder) , even a larger MacBook will move. 

The square ones are much more loose IMO, in a good way. As long as they've fixed the issue of the fraying cable (which I'm sure they have), this seems like an improvement. Perhaps as they move towards thinner designs, they also want to create a flatter shape rather than a big round cylinder? 

post #56 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadowbuster View Post

Here's a review that explains why the new non-Retina model is actually better:

 

 

I disagree. That was a BS review, emphasizing what the author felt were negatives and downplaying all the positives. He doesn't take into account the actual cost of the technology implemented in the Retina Macbook Pro (Retina display, SS memory, thunderbolt, unibody, etc.) nor does he do any sort of cost analysis when describing the computer as being "extremely high price(d), even for Apple". When you look at what you get, it's actually quite reasonable.

 

I think the guys is pretty uninformed and has no business writing a tech review.

post #57 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloodstains View Post

When did Apple switch away from the right angle magsafe and why?

There are certain angles where a pull on the cable won't pop the L-magsafe connector out. Route the cable to the rear of the MacBook and pull hard...

 

Maybe someone just like more-square connectors.

post #58 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by agramonte View Post

 

you know you can just buy an SSD and put it in a legacy MacBook Pro. Also a 500gig hybrid is 100 buck.

 

As long as you don't need to worry about warranty service any more...
post #59 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by n3o View Post

 

And you don't even have to use both TB ports, since you can simply connect the second external display to the TB port on the first one (daisy chain).

Are you certain? Something in the back of dusty memory says that a display was by Thunderbolt spec definition to be the terminal device in a TB chain.

post #60 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

That looks like a serial number if I am not mistaken.  The model number should have an M with an ending of LL/A.

 

Apple products use that convention, ST95005620AS looks like a model number for a Seagate Momentus hybrid drive.

post #61 of 129

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadowbuster View Post

Here's a review that explains why the new non-Retina model is actually better:

 

In the "there I fixed it for you" dept:  "Here's a semi-informed review that explains why the new non-Retina model might actually be better for my needs:"

 

And see Anandtech articles below - other res's look fine to me as needed - and the review really doesn't take the SSD performance/price factor into account.  And doesn't mention weight in its "pros" (just "sleek").  PS: Never heard of Duglin.net.  Maybe it's trolling for controversy clicks.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by agramonte View Post

exactly... this never made any sense to me - why am I paying for a sharper menu bar but with 1440X900 workspace, if I go to 1680X1050 I loose performance.

it just makes no sense to drop 2200 on this for a design workflow

 

Maybe, again, not for your workflow, but at least see below....

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by badtz View Post

It has been stated by Anandtech that even at the non-optimal resolutions, it still looks crisper/better than the older displays (even 1680x1050 high-density optional displays). Apple is applying 2x resolution on the resolution you choose, then downscaling from there. Much different than just taking the 2x graphic assets and downscaling it.

 

See:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/5996/how-the-retina-display-macbook-pro-handles-scaling

http://www.anandtech.com/show/5998/macbook-pro-retina-display-analysis

 

All kinds of usable workspaces to my eyes that will be even more so as programs are optimized.  

 

The only ding for me is knowing the 512 GB SSD will likely be offered next year for the price of this year's 256 - with maybe 8-9 hour battery life on the Ivy Bridge follow on - I keep machines for 3-5 years.  $200 for 16 GB of RAM I can handle.  But $600 to get upgraded on-board storage to what I'm already using (and a "meh" CPU speed bump) makes it harder to pull that trigger on this first rev - even though I NEED to replace my ancient laptop and desktop with one portable minimum compromises machine.

 

And yeah I know about if you keep waiting for perfect, you'll never buy, and $3000 won't kill me, etc.  Decisions, decisions......

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post #62 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

It's kind of confusing that the ports with little lighting bolts on them are *not* power connectors. I wonder how many people who don't know about Thunderbolt will be confused by that.

 

It's the same as the iMac port from last year and I haven't heard anybody complain about it.

 

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post #63 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by agramonte View Post

on not by a mile - but sometimes you just need space over extra reed speeds.

 

I did an OCZ V3 SSD for OS/apps and a 500 Momentus XT hybrid on a caddy on a mini and it makes for a nice combo 

I have a mini with 256 SSD and 750 HD. Nice combo. I thought they might do that with the Retina, but I guess it added too much weight. OTOH you can get 750 SSD for $500 over the 512 SSD.

post #64 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

The 'retina' display is superb and even though the actual desktop space is equivalent to 1440x900 you can view and edit 1080p video in full resolution but it only consumes 2/3 of the display width whereas it doesn't even fit onto a 1680x1050 screen.  The same case is made for image manipulation.  

 

So although you have a workspace of 1440x900 it enables full scale viewing of media etc.  If you work with any image based media or just want a screen you can work with for long periods of time with reduced eye strain then there is no better solution in a laptop.

 

there used to be, it was called the 17" macbook pro, the screen was 1920x1200 of lovely

 

i've got a 15" mbp and a 17" mbp, the 15" gets used for appleseed and testing, the 17" is the one i work with, it's not about resolution, it's about image size at comfortable working distance, on the 17" i can render an a4 page lifesize, a 15" cannot

 

plus it's got more than enough space around the keyboard for my toasted sandwich and wine glass when travelling by air, it's these little touches that count

post #65 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveH View Post

As long as you don't need to worry about warranty service any more...

To be fair, the suggestion was adding SSD to an older MBP, so warranty service probably isn't an issue. You could say, however, that there's a risk of damaging something while replacing the hard drive. Some of the connectors are fairly fragile. However, with proper care, replacing a hard drive in most MBP models isn't that difficult.

Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

The 'retina' display is superb and even though the actual desktop space is equivalent to 1440x900 you can view and edit 1080p video in full resolution but it only consumes 2/3 of the display width whereas it doesn't even fit onto a 1680x1050 screen.  The same case is made for image manipulation.  

So although you have a workspace of 1440x900 it enables full scale viewing of media etc.  If you work with any image based media or just want a screen you can work with for long periods of time with reduced eye strain then there is no better solution in a laptop.

That has not been established. It is not obvious that a 15" screen with twice the resolution would cause more eyestrain than a 17" screen with less resolution. Do you have any evidence to back up your claim?

Furthermore, it probably depends on the person.
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post #66 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Just for reference, my experience with they hybrid isn't that impressive. I have a 500 GB hybrid in my MBP and it's not all that much faster than the previous 7200 rpm drive. For some tasks, it's probably significant, but it doesn't provide the instantaneous responsiveness of an SSD.

 

Meh - hybrid HDDs are a marketing gimmick. Check out any benchmarks, they're usually as slow as the HDD they're based on. A real SSD is way faster.

post #67 of 129

Just heard from a few people that the retina display MBP lags - scrolling in Safari or iTunes is stuttery and slow, as is editing video in iMovie.

 

Is that true? 

 

Please make it not so (mine's on order)...

 

Edit: Looks like that's just without the trackpad update installed. Nothing to see here, move along...


Edited by orthorim - 6/16/12 at 8:38am
post #68 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by orthorim View Post

Meh - hybrid HDDs are a marketing gimmick. Check out any benchmarks, they're usually as slow as the HDD they're based on. A real SSD is way faster.

That's not correct. There are plenty of benchmarks which show them to be nearly as fast as SSDs. See the link someone else provided above. The benchmarks that Seagate uses, for example, shows them to be 80-90% as fast as SSDs.

However, this is a case where you have to be VERY careful about the benchmark you choose. Hybrid hdds speed things up in very specific circumstances. If you regularly launch and quit the same app, it will speed up that app launching, for example. But that's not the way most people work, so the benchmarks are misleading.

Even the boot time benchmark is extremely misleading. If you reboot frequently, it might make a difference. However, I tend to reboot once a week or less. During that time, whatever 'boot' information is in NAND gets replaced with more recent information, so the boot time isn't significantly improved. Maybe it would be better with the newer 8 GB version, but I wouldn't hold my breath.

For my average day to day use (which seems to mimic Anand's benchmark), hybrids don't do very much.
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post #69 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveH View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by agramonte View Post

 

you know you can just buy an SSD and put it in a legacy MacBook Pro. Also a 500gig hybrid is 100 buck.

 

As long as you don't need to worry about warranty service any more...

Could you please explain? As far as I know the legacy MacBook Pro owner's manuals give instructions for user replacement of the hard drive and memory.

post #70 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveH View Post

Are you certain? Something in the back of dusty memory says that a display was by Thunderbolt spec definition to be the terminal device in a TB chain.

Yes. The LED Cinema Display, which was DisplayPort instead of Thunderbolt, would be the terminal device like you said. As would any other DisplayPort display.

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post #71 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by orthorim View Post

Just heard from a few people that the retina display MBP lags - scrolling in Safari or iTunes is stuttery and slow, as is editing video in iMovie.

 

Is that true? 

 

Please make it not so (mine's on order)...

 

Edit: Looks like that's just without the trackpad update installed. Nothing to see here, move along...

On MacRumors they have a thread where they did all kinds of experiments. The conclusion are as follows (using the base, weakest model):

 

1) In Apple store, with or without discrete GPU, there is noticeable lag on ALL resolutions. Based on 2) that I'm about the describe, the conclusion is that the software loaded on the RMBPs in store is buggy.

 

2) On user's computers, with the trackpad update, and running Lion, there is still some lag, on all resolutions with both graphic cards, especially in iTunes and on some sites in Safari. Nothing nearly as bad as in Apple Stores though.

 

3) On user's computers, with Mountain Lion DP4, there is no longer any noticeable lag, as demonstrated in multiple videos and tests, on any resolution, using the Intel HD 4000. iTunes is still buggy though and would therefore like require an update. 

 

Conclusion, with Mountain Lion there is pretty much no longer any problem whatsoever, indicating it isn't the Intel GPU which can't handle Retina displays, but rather the problem pertains to, thus far, poor driver implementation in Lion.

post #72 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidB View Post

Could you please explain? As far as I know the legacy MacBook Pro owner's manuals give instructions for user replacement of the hard drive and memory.

My understanding is that your warranty remains intact so long as you don't damage anything in the act of performing the upgrade. If you torqued a connector somewhere or something like that, then they're probably going to charge you to replace the part.

If you're really worried about it, you can pay an Apple authorized service center to do the upgrade for you. Machines of some generations are better than others, so you probably should go look up some instructions. The iFixit guides are very good, if you get all the recommended tools, set aside some time to avoid rushing, follow the directions step by step, and keep proper track of the screws, you'll be fine.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

That's not correct. There are plenty of benchmarks which show them to be nearly as fast as SSDs. See the link someone else provided above. The benchmarks that Seagate uses, for example, shows them to be 80-90% as fast as SSDs.
However, this is a case where you have to be VERY careful about the benchmark you choose. Hybrid hdds speed things up in very specific circumstances. If you regularly launch and quit the same app, it will speed up that app launching, for example. But that's not the way most people work, so the benchmarks are misleading.
Even the boot time benchmark is extremely misleading. If you reboot frequently, it might make a difference. However, I tend to reboot once a week or less. During that time, whatever 'boot' information is in NAND gets replaced with more recent information, so the boot time isn't significantly improved. Maybe it would be better with the newer 8 GB version, but I wouldn't hold my breath.
For my average day to day use (which seems to mimic Anand's benchmark), hybrids don't do very much.

That's unfortunate, I was hoping the devices were smarter about what they cached into the flash section. I think it can be done, but not with this apparent attitude of "phoning it in".
Edited by JeffDM - 6/16/12 at 7:01pm
post #73 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by djames4242 View Post

Nope - the Pros went to the right-angle around the time of the Unibody. Makes one wonder if Apple has real-world data from their Genius Bars indicating that the angled magsafe connectors were less likely to release causing more laptops to be damaged from tripping. I've been through three of the straight-on connectored adapters (one was replaced under AppleCare) while the two angled adapters are still working perfectly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by the cool gut View Post

Incorrect.  Pros where right angle well.  I think they switch because the cord on the right angle would be blocking the TB ports.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post

The Pros were originally straight. But it sounds like they moved to right angle at some point, as you indicate.

I didn't realize they changed. I don't upgrade often, so I didn't know that detail. My buddy's early MBP Unibody was straight, but his is a few years old. The regular Unibodies in the Apple Store were right angle. I wonder why they only switched on the Retina model.
post #74 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


I didn't realize they changed. I don't upgrade often, so I didn't know that detail. My buddy's early MBP Unibody was straight, but his is a few years old. The regular Unibodies in the Apple Store were right angle. I wonder why they only switched on the Retina model.

 

I don't know why they reverted back to the straight on model, but the straight model had high failure rates. When you twist or bend them, they tend to break at the juncture where the cable meets the connector. The seem cracks and then the connections become loose inside. This happened to me twice and they needed to replace the adapters under AppleCare warranty. Over time, even if you are very careful with them, just bumping them or moving the computer around when they are connected puts a lot of strain on the cable and its seem.

 

When they changed my adapters both times the geniuses mentioned this was a very common problem with those adapters. The second time they replaced my Magsafe they gave me the right-angled one as a replacement, and the Genius mentioned this model was much better. He might have just been saying that, but this one has lasted considerably longer than the other two and shows no sign of deterioration. In fact when you look at the right-angled ones carefully, you notice the metal casing actually reinforces the rubber at its thickest part in such a way that the seem doesn't have to take the majority of the stress from the cable being tugged or bent. I suspect the right-angled ones are still vulnerable to breaking when twisted, but these adapters seem far better designed in terms of durability.

 

This all raises the question though, why then did the RMBPs revert to the old straight models? I don't know. I haven't received my RMBP yet so I can't examine the adapter, but I think it is likely as one poster already mentioned, so as to ensure they are not unidirectional. The adapter would obviously block the TB port if put in the wrong direction. The right-angled magsafes are less convenient to use than the straight on model for that very reason. Perhaps then many users complained enough that Apple realized those voices outnumbered the complaints regarding the durability of the straight-on model.

post #75 of 129
Shadowbuster makes his first and only post about how the RMBP sucks with a hyperlink to this "review"? Sounds like someone was looking ofr page hits on their site to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by johndoe98 View Post

I don't know why they reverted back to the straight on model, but the straight model had high failure rates. When you twist or bend them, they tend to break at the juncture where the cable meets the connector.

Considering Apple knew this and then changed it... and then changed it back I have to assume they have their reasons and have sorted it out. The new MagSafe connector does look considerably larger than the original.

Perhaps the side mounted cable didn't allow for a proper "pop off" when tension was applied thus causing the connectors to wear improperly if pulled sideways or making the utility of MagSafe considerably less effective if one were to trip on the cable.

Anyone want to cut into the two straight cabled connectors to see what differences are inside?

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

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post #76 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Shadowbuster makes his first and only post about how the RMBP sucks with a hyperlink to this "review"? Sounds like someone was looking ofr page hits on their site to me.
Considering Apple knew this and then changed it... and then changed it back I have to assume they have their reasons and have sorted it out. The new MagSafe connector does look considerably larger than the original.
Perhaps the side mounted cable didn't allow for a proper "pop off" when tension was applied thus causing the connectors to wear improperly if pulled sideways or making the utility of MagSafe considerably less effective if one were to trip on the cable.
Anyone want to cut into the two straight cabled connectors to see what differences are inside?

 

This is actually a very good point. I notice that these right-angled ones don't really pop-off at all. Often, being the clumsy idiot that I am, I trip on my wires. The Magsafe adapter, rather than pop-off like the old models did, often just let the dam power plug come out of its socket. When I trip hard enough they will pop-out, so thankfully I never had the laptop fly off the desk. But often the way the cable tugs is parallel to the way the connector is attached which makes it very hard to pop off. Try it yourself, pull the cable perfectly aligned with the metal cylindric casing (not too hard, don't wanna pull the cable out of its socket). When you align the tug just right, it takes quite a bit of force... That isn't the case at all with the straight-on model since the magnets are pretty weak.

post #77 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Considering Apple knew this and then changed it... and then changed it back I have to assume they have their reasons and have sorted it out. The new MagSafe connector does look considerably larger than the original.

It looks like it has a metal cover on the end instead of plastic:

http://www.macworld.com/article/1167220/magsafe_2_featured_in_apples_latest_laptops.html

but in the picture, it looks like the joining point is going to be fragile. The cable is soft and then it suddenly goes into a rigid connector. That will create a lot of pressure at the joining point. They should taper the plastic going into the connector so that the pressure is distributed over a longer part of the cable instead of being focused at a single point. They used to taper the powerbook connectors. They could also use slightly thicker plastic on the cable - they are far too flimsy. They could even be flattened like the Mini power cable to help prevent twisting.
post #78 of 129

As great as this machine looks, anybody who has history with an older Mac Book Pro should reconsider.

 

My experience with my latest Mac Book Pro.  The battery has been replaced twice, the RAM has been upgraded, the HD has been replaced twice, and the graphics were recalled by Apple.  Most of these easy repairs I did myself by simply watching YouTube videos.  This Mac is almost 5 years old and is better today than when I purchased it.

 

These new Retina Display Mac's all but take away the ability to upgrade, repair and re-use.  The glass is fused to the frame.  The RAM is soldered to the logic board.  The batteries are glued to the frame.  You need a very special proprietary tool to access the screws inside the machine.

 

Apple has built an incredible machine with the new Retina Display ... but this machine is on the clock from the moment you buy it.

post #79 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donnyishere View Post

Apple has built an incredible machine with the new Retina Display ... but this machine is on the clock from the moment you buy it.

Just like every machine ever made by anyone. Upgrade your RAM and swap your hard drives all you want… it's still a laptop. Good luck changing the CPU and GPU.

Stop the FUD.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #80 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by johndoe98 View Post

I don't know why they reverted back to the straight on model, but the straight model had high failure rates. When you twist or bend them, they tend to break at the juncture where the cable meets the connector. The seem cracks and then the connections become loose inside. This happened to me twice and they needed to replace the adapters under AppleCare warranty. Over time, even if you are very careful with them, just bumping them or moving the computer around when they are connected puts a lot of strain on the cable and its seem.

When they changed my adapters both times the geniuses mentioned this was a very common problem with those adapters. The second time they replaced my Magsafe they gave me the right-angled one as a replacement, and the Genius mentioned this model was much better. He might have just been saying that, but this one has lasted considerably longer than the other two and shows no sign of deterioration. In fact when you look at the right-angled ones carefully, you notice the metal casing actually reinforces the rubber at its thickest part in such a way that the seem doesn't have to take the majority of the stress from the cable being tugged or bent. I suspect the right-angled ones are still vulnerable to breaking when twisted, but these adapters seem far better designed in terms of durability.

This all raises the question though, why then did the RMBPs revert to the old straight models? I don't know. I haven't received my RMBP yet so I can't examine the adapter, but I think it is likely as one poster already mentioned, so as to ensure they are not unidirectional. The adapter would obviously block the TB port if put in the wrong direction. The right-angled magsafes are less convenient to use than the straight on model for that very reason. Perhaps then many users complained enough that Apple realized those voices outnumbered the complaints regarding the durability of the straight-on model.


It's not a reversion to the old model, at the very least, it's an updated connector. I don't think those problems are unsolvable with that style connector. I agree that the original wasn't secured very well, and it looks to me like a problem that can be fixed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Shadowbuster makes his first and only post about how the RMBP sucks with a hyperlink to this "review"? Sounds like someone was looking ofr page hits on their site to me.

Good thought. I axed Shadowbuster's post and reply links just in case. If he's for real, then he can respond.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Just like every machine ever made by anyone. Upgrade your RAM and swap your hard drives all you want… it's still a laptop. Good luck changing the CPU and GPU.
Stop the FUD.

There is some point to the complaint though. I've often been able to significantly extend the service life of a computer just by upgrading its memory and storage, because those are the slowest components. For example, the computer I have on my laser engraver is about ten years old now.
Edited by JeffDM - 6/17/12 at 8:45am
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