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Developers at WWDC not worried about iPhone, iPad screen size changes

post #1 of 58
Thread Starter 
If Apple does release a larger iPhone and smaller iPad, developers who attended the Worldwide Developers Conference last week said they're not too concerned the changes would be a significant hassle for them.

Analyst Gene Munster of Piper Jaffray polled 100 developers at WWDC 2012 in San Francisco, Calif., and asked them how difficult it would be to adjust their applications to two new screen sizes, presuming Apple were to make an iPhone with a larger screen, as well as a smaller "iPad mini."

Developers were asked to indicate, on a scale of one to 10, how difficult it might be for them to change their applications for the new screen sizes. On average, developers at WWDC said the difficulty would be just a 3.4 out of 10, suggesting they don't see it as a major issue.

"Given the relative ease expected by developers for utilizing potential new iOS screen sizes, we believe the introduction of new screen sizes would not affect the success or availability of the apps on iOS," Munster said.

Apple's next iPhone is expected to have a slightly larger, 4-inch display with 16-to-9 ratio that could offer more screen real estate while still allowing users to operate their iPhone with just one hand. All previous iPhone models have had a 3.5-inch screen with a 3-to-2 aspect ratio.

iPhone display analysis


Other reports have also claimed that Apple plans to introduce a smaller iPad with a 7.85-inch display this fall. The new device is rumored to feature a 1,024-by-768-pixel display, which would allow applications built for the first-generation iPad and iPad 2 to run natively on the smaller screen.

Developers at WWDC last week also indicated to Munster's team that 55 percent of them develop for both Apple's iOS and Google Android. Another 14 percent develop for Windows Phone, and 9 percent create applications for Research in Motion's BlackBerry platform.

The numbers suggest that iOS developer support for Android is growing, as last year 47 percent of iOS developers at WWDC also developed for Android. But support for BlackBerry plummeted from 36 percent last year.

Unsurprisingly, given that WWDC is an Apple-run show, developers indicated a strong preference for iOS. Among the 55 developers who create applications for both iOS and Android, 84 percent said that iOS was best for ease of development, while just 5 percent went with Android, and 2 percent chose Windows Phone.

WWDC


Developers also said that they see iOS having the highest future revenue potential for their applications, as 64 percent of developers see themselves making more money from Apple. Just 5 percent said they expect to make more money from Android, and the remaining 31 percent were either undecided or did not feel comfortable answering the question.

"We believe that Apple's loyal developer base will continue to develop cutting edge apps for iOS that will draw in new customers, helping to fuel continued growth in iOS device sales," Munster said.
post #2 of 58
I'm looking forward to the 'larger' iPad ...
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #3 of 58
Good to hear. Hopefully this means we wont necessarily get a tall skinny iPhone 5....
post #4 of 58
Quote:
 All previous iPhone models have had a 3.5-inch screen with a 4-to-3 aspect ratio.

 

Seriously, who writes for AI?? Obviously the iPhone is 3:2 and the iPad is 4:3.

I'm not a pessimist. I'm an optimist, with experience.
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I'm not a pessimist. I'm an optimist, with experience.
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post #5 of 58
It's customary when quoting to repeat what the quoted source stated, not to change it to something incorrect and then complain about an imaginary mistake. The article states that the iPhone aspect ratio is 3 to 2, so one has to wonder what your point is.
post #6 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post

It's customary when quoting to repeat what the quoted source stated, not to change it to something incorrect and then complain about an imaginary mistake. The article states that the iPhone aspect ratio is 3 to 2, so one has to wonder what your point is.

It has since been corrected. It was not correct an hour ago. At least they're not entirely asleep at the wheel. 

I'm not a pessimist. I'm an optimist, with experience.
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I'm not a pessimist. I'm an optimist, with experience.
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post #7 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lerxt View Post

Good to hear. Hopefully this means we wont necessarily get a tall skinny iPhone 5....

 

I read it the opposite - we will almost certainly get a tall skinny iPhone because that causes the least disruption for iOS developers. We've had too many leaked parts for anything else now. If they were going to change the shape I would have thought we would have seen parts with different sizes but they have all been consistent - tall and skinny.

 

Also means the iPad Mini is a real possibility if all the iPad 2 app's will work on it without any changes required. I think the iPad Mini will be the hot must have Christmas present this year.

post #8 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

 

I read it the opposite - we will almost certainly get a tall skinny iPhone because that causes the least disruption for iOS developers. We've had too many leaked parts for anything else now. If they were going to change the shape I would have thought we would have seen parts with different sizes but they have all been consistent - tall and skinny.

 

Also means the iPad Mini is a real possibility if all the iPad 2 app's will work on it without any changes required. I think the iPad Mini will be the hot must have Christmas present this year.


I hope these things don't come to be. Make the things faster, add NFC, addtactile response... but don't break what works, a perfect form factor.

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #9 of 58

They introduced a new Interface Builder mode for the Mac at WWDC last year, that lets you do GUIs in a more resolution independent way. Hopefully this will make it to iOS soon.

post #10 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

They introduced a new Interface Builder mode for the Mac at WWDC last year, that lets you do GUIs in a more resolution independent way. Hopefully this will make it to iOS soon.

You mean moving beyond the old "springs and struts" paradigm?  Yes, that's one of the changes introduced last week.  I don't know how well it works yet.  The old model wasn't robust enough to handle arbitrary screen sizes; presumably the new way will be much better.  ... and then the Android folks will steal that and it will help them deal with their device diversity mess.

post #11 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by malax View Post

You mean moving beyond the old "springs and struts" paradigm?  Yes, that's one of the changes introduced last week.  I don't know how well it works yet.  The old model wasn't robust enough to handle arbitrary screen sizes; presumably the new way will be much better.  ... and then the Android folks will steal that and it will help them deal with their device diversity mess.

I'm not an experienced Android developer, but I believe Android already adopts a flexible markup-based approach for setting up UIs. This is why Android phone apps scale up nicely on tablets, whereas iPhone apps are "pixel-doubled." In a way, this has worked to Apple's advantage since it incentivized developers to do tablet-specific interfaces for their apps, which make better use of the larger screen.

post #12 of 58

I thought I wanted (and still do) a 16:9 iPad, but competitor tablets look odd with that aspect ratio. It could just be that I'm biased against Samsung tablets etc. 

post #13 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lerxt View Post

Hopefully this means we won't necessarily get a tall skinny iPhone 5….

That's the opposite of what this is implying.

Also, it's not the frigging iPhone 5.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #14 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

I read it the opposite - we will almost certainly get a tall skinny iPhone because that causes the least disruption for iOS developers. We've had too many leaked parts for anything else now. If they were going to change the shape I would have thought we would have seen parts with different sizes but they have all been consistent - tall and skinny.

Also means the iPad Mini is a real possibility if all the iPad 2 app's will work on it without any changes required. I think the iPad Mini will be the hot must have Christmas present this year.
I'm with you. This seems like it will be a breeze for developers to adopt. After all, if you look at Mail and Safari they stretch and shrink to the height of the window when you rotate already so developers should have building their apps to allow for this without a static display size. The only exception are games which the letterboxing will be adequate for now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lightknight View Post


I hope these things don't come to be. Make the things faster, add NFC, addtactile response... but don't break what works, a perfect form factor.
I'd say NFC is much more difficult for Apple than this new display size. It's not just about adding the HW but creating the SW and the infrastructure to make it usable. Unless they are only in secret talks with MC and Visa I would have thought there would be inevitable leaks about this service if it was coming. Passbook looks like a great step that uses (an assumed) Yelp-based geo-fence but it's only an intermediary step.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #15 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by avium View Post

I'm not an experienced Android developer, but I believe Android already adopts a flexible markup-based approach for setting up UIs. This is why Android phone apps scale up nicely on tablets, whereas iPhone apps are "pixel-doubled." In a way, this has worked to Apple's advantage since it incentivized developers to do tablet-specific interfaces for their apps, which make better use of the larger screen.

That isn't correct. Android apps are notorious for not scaling up properly on different Android phones, much less tablets. Sometimes the apps don't work at all, and other times, they "work" but are barely usable.

With the new iPad allowing retina apps to finally appear in their resolution on the iPad, most of the scaling problem with the lower rez iPhone apps has gone away.
post #16 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


Also, it's not the frigging iPhone 5.

Heh! You're fixated on this, aren't you? I see your posts on other sites complaining about this too. Hey! It's only a name, and it will only say "iPhone" on the back, as it always has.
post #17 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Hey! It's only a name…

It truly is not just a name.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #18 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightknight View Post


I hope these things don't come to be. Make the things faster, add NFC, addtactile response... but don't break what works, a perfect form factor.

Forget NFC. I think it's a dead issue. It looks as though Apple is interested in using either WiFi, or more likely, Bluetooth 4 for this purpose, as they do in their own stores. How they will negate the NFC chips in the devices used on the products, I don't know. But there doesn't appear to be a need for NFC chips in the phone itself. Another technology that may be going away before it arrives.
post #19 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

It truly is not just a name.

The name is "iPhone". The rest isn't important. Even Cook was saying this in his interview at All Things D. I don't see what the big deal is. People will buy it because it's a new model, has new features and a new version of the OS. They won't be buying it because it's called the "iPhone5", or the "iPhone 6", or whatever.

The lack of a number doesn't seem to have hurt new iPad sales. And "new" isn't officially part of the name, it's just a description that this is the new model.

Seriously, why do you care?
post #20 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Forget NFC. I think it's a dead issue.

I wasn't too jazzed about having all of my money also stolen if my phone (camera, camcorder, music player, etc.) was stolen, anyway.

As long as Bluetooth 4 can be made secure enough for this sort of thing, then I'm sure some people will enjoy using it.

Me, I still just like cloth money. I don't trust this whole credit card business.
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

The lack of a number doesn't seem to have hurt new iPad sales. And "new" isn't officially part of the name, it's just a description that this is the new model.

Notice that I never said I was against that. I'm expecting it to be "the new iPhone".
Quote:
Seriously, why do you care?

Say a brand new product category is introduced. The first model in this category has a name that ends in "3". People immediately ask where the other two were. Say a vehicle is designed as the "2012 model". Then a brand new one comes out the next year, new design, new hardware, developed entirely separately, also called the "2012 model".

This can be extrapolated further to the name itself, with all the various scenarios therein. Absolutely the name of the product is important.
Edited by Tallest Skil - 6/18/12 at 7:50am

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #21 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by thataveragejoe View Post

It has since been corrected. It was not correct an hour ago. At least they're not entirely asleep at the wheel. 

 

That makes more sense but as for going a little heavy on the criticism, getting it right every time is not as easy as it looks. Being an ex-journalist (including a few years editing), I can assure you that quite capable people do miss stuff from time to time. It happens. It shouldn't but it does. 

post #22 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Forget NFC. I think it's a dead issue. It looks as though Apple is interested in using either WiFi, or more likely, Bluetooth 4 for this purpose, as they do in their own stores. How they will negate the NFC chips in the devices used on the products, I don't know. But there doesn't appear to be a need for NFC chips in the phone itself. Another technology that may be going away before it arrives.
They might but neither of those technologies are as secure as NFC and neither of them are ideal for majority of businesses. NFC's unique properties allow it to create a very small loop between devices. Even Low Energy Bluetooth can have a 50 meter range so your only security measure is the encryption used to send the data. NFC's loop is only about 6" and uses a secure handshake that makes it very difficult to intercept another's data.

In many ways it's more secure than a CC card because there is no way one can copy the number by sight, a camera, carbon paper, and it's less likely to see or capture a PIN when that PIN is only be used on your handheld device. It's also easier to cancel all cards immediately if your phone is stolen by locking and erasing the device and auto-informing all financial institutions registered with the device than by having to remember what was in your wallet and then dig up numbers for each.

"NFC*. Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but soon... and for the rest of your life."


* Or an NFC-like alternative.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #23 of 58
I don't want NFC for money stuff. I can use it for tons of other things ;)

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #24 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


They might but neither of those technologies are as secure as NFC and neither of them are ideal for majority of businesses. NFC's unique properties allow it to create a very small loop between devices. Even Low Energy Bluetooth can have a 50 meter range so your only security measure is the encryption used to send the data. NFC's loop is only about 6" and uses a secure handshake that makes it very difficult to intercept another's data.

NFC is not secure either - it's trivial to make a reader and intercept data - it's already been done with NFC in credit cards. A better option is already possible with existing hardware — one-time use 2D barcodes.

post #25 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


That isn't correct. Android apps are notorious for not scaling up properly on different Android phones, much less tablets. Sometimes the apps don't work at all, and other times, they "work" but are barely usable.
With the new iPad allowing retina apps to finally appear in their resolution on the iPad, most of the scaling problem with the lower rez iPhone apps has gone away.

 

Um, nothing I said is incorrect. Android apps have fragmentation issues when developers opt out from the prescribed approach, e.g., while developing highly-custom UIs for games. And I can't speak to how well Android's layout scheme works in general (I'm not an Android user) but I assume it works pretty well for vanilla stuff.

 

Quoting from http://developer.android.com/guide/practices/screens_support.html#screen-independence ...

 

 

Quote:

To optimize your application's UI for the different screen sizes and densities, you can provide alternative resources for any of the generalized sizes and densities. Typically, you should provide alternative layouts for some of the different screen sizes and alternative bitmap images for different screen densities. At runtime, the system uses the appropriate resources for your application, based on the generalized size or density of the current device screen.

You do not need to provide alternative resources for every combination of screen size and density. The system provides robust compatibility features that can handle most of the work of rendering your application on any device screen, provided that you've implemented your UI using techniques that allow it to gracefully resize (as described in the Best Practices, below).

post #26 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by malax View Post

You mean moving beyond the old "springs and struts" paradigm?  Yes, that's one of the changes introduced last week.  I don't know how well it works yet.  The old model wasn't robust enough to handle arbitrary screen sizes; presumably the new way will be much better.  ... and then the Android folks will steal that and it will help them deal with their device diversity mess.

Ah, ok, that's good. I'm still waiting for the videos to go up.

post #27 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obi-Wan Kubrick View Post

I thought I wanted (and still do) a 16:9 iPad, but competitor tablets look odd with that aspect ratio. It could just be that I'm biased against Samsung tablets etc. 

I think it's because 16:9 is an awkward size to the eye and hand when it falls to the level of a tablet. On a movie screen, its origin, it's ok. Even as a TV screen, it seems oppressive to me, actually depressive. It's like Hollywood has dictated a geometry based on its debased standards. It's a prison-profile of an aspect ratio when it's reduced in size from the big screen.

The present iPad aspect feels right, like perfectly proportioned. Landscape looks like a classic landscape painting, portrait like a portrait. It's humane, and 16:9 is not.

The original iPhone is different. Just ok, neither natural nor unnatural. When it goes 16:9, I think it will escape the curse of the movie-screen-domination feel because you hold it in one hand. You dominate it. Your brain will be telling you you are holding a big movie in your hand. Charm by miniaturization. But if that ratio is taken up to tablet size, suddenly the awkward geometry takes over, and you're dealing with a slab, or a "slate," as Balmer likes to call it.

Long meditation on aspect ratio, hope it's not too tiresome. I trust Ive and Jobs on this, because they rely on both feel and look, the tactile and the visual, together. Others have no clue, thus 16:9 tablets.
Edited by Flaneur - 6/18/12 at 10:11am
post #28 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gustav View Post

NFC is not secure either - it's trivial to make a reader and intercept data - it's already been done with NFC in credit cards. A better option is already possible with existing hardware — one-time use 2D barcodes.

No security measure is absolute, but NFC is more secure than WiFi, BT, or simply being able to read the numbers off a card. NFC is as secure as an ATM machine where someone could put another device on it capture card and PIN data, but those have worked out very well for society.

One time codes offer a false sense of security but they do offer complexity. While they appear to be random to the average person they follow a specific set of rules which is how the devices can talk to each other. We've had these in computer software for decades and for almost as long we've had programs that can hack them.

The best methods will still require a personal PIN and that makes NFC more secure than giving your card to a minimum wage worker that you've never seen before and likely never again.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #29 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


Notice that I never said I was against that. I'm expecting it to be "the new iPhone".

 

You have been on every Mac forum lambasting anyone calling it the iPhone 5 and adamant it will be called the iPhone 6. Seems like you're hedging your bets now. LOL

post #30 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

You have been on every Mac forum lambasting anyone calling it the iPhone 5 and adamant it will be called the iPhone 6.

Yes, before the introduction of the 3rd iPad. My personal opinion was that it would have been "iPhone 6"; I was only ever adamant that it would not be "iPhone 5".

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #31 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

You have been on every Mac forum lambasting anyone calling it the iPhone 5 and adamant it will be called the iPhone 6. Seems like you're hedging your bets now. LOL

That has never been his position. It's always been, just like mine and others, that the 6th generation iPhone with a presumed Apple A6 chip running iOS 6 would not be called iPhone 5. Additionally, the argument arose when people stated that iPhone 6 didn't make any sense when '5' was erroneously rationalized to come after '4S'.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #32 of 58

I'm sure it doesn't matter but I will not want an 16:9 iPhone. In my view 16 is too long and 9 is not wide enough. Also I find the size of the screen vs the phone is too little. Too much unused space. The sexy / modern / trendy / amazing would be if the screen would span from one edge to the other removing the bazel effectively. I don't really need the home button and I don't mind if it is not round. I'd prefer a phone that may be shorter but a little bit wider, the whole front is just a screen. I think it is a big mistake for Apple to make the iPhone to be a long stick. I don't see how this will appeal to the customers, what is the additional benefit of a long and narrow iPhone. I will definitely not buy it and will just stay with my iPhone 4 until it breaks down completely.

 

But this is just my opinion, so please don't rant. I'd like to be an Apple fan, but if they do this I can't. I hope the rumours are false, but it looks too real so my hope is disappearing with each new article. Of course, there will be many who will go with the crowd and praise anything just because it's Apple, but the majority of the people liked Apple for a reason. I think it's clear that the trend is bigger screen but proportionately, Apple may lose by trying to be too smart or too cautious. It doesn't matter if app developers can change their apps or not. The iPhone is the most profitable platform a new screen size will not change that. I think 4" or 4.5" at 3.2 aspect ratio would be great, then I would feel the new iPhone is "instant get". Otherwise not. I'm sorry for Apple (if the rumours are true - hopefully not).

post #33 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

The 3GS, 4S, and lack of an iPhone 2 proved that Apple will call it whatever they hell they feel like. If they want to call it the iPhone 7MF that is their right. But more importantly, who cares? 
The fact that it's being discussed is proof that some people care. My caring has been solely placed on the rational behind what it will be called, not what it will be called. I've stated, along with TS, that calling it the iPhone 5 makes the least amount of sense. That said, they can call it the iPhone 5 if they wish and if it suits my needs I'll buy it just as if they called it the Zune N900 Ishtar now with Flavour Crystals I'd also buy it if it suited my needs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MamboAndras View Post

I'm sure it doesn't matter but I will not want an 16:9 iPhone. In my view 16 is too long and 9 is not wide enough.
I can see how it might be too long for you but I don't see how it will not be wide enough since the proposed resolution and size will not alter the width of the display in any way. There is even one rumour which says the pixel density will decrease from 326 to 320 PPI thus making it slightly wider than it is now as it moves to a nearly 16:9 aspect ratio. In either case it will not be any narrower than it is today.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #34 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I can see how it might be too long for you but I don't see how it will not be wide enough since the proposed resolution and size will not alter the width of the display in any way. There is even one rumour which says the pixel density will decrease from 326 to 320 PPI thus making it slightly wider than it is now as it moves to a nearly 16:9 aspect ratio. In either case it will not be any narrower than it is today.

 

Maybe I didn't express myself perfectly, what I meant about "too long" or "not wide enough" was relative to the other dimension. Well, I'm serious now so I don't want to go into the area of jokes. I think Apple is making a mistake here (if the rumours are true), but good luck to them. Anyway, I'd recommend them not to stop here, but take a step further and make it 2.1:1 as I think that's the proper size for movies. That would be revolutionary. :-) Could be called the retina "stick". 

post #35 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamboAndras View Post

I'm sure it doesn't matter but I will not want an 16:9 iPhone. In my view 16 is too long and 9 is not wide enough. Also I find the size of the screen vs the phone is too little. Too much unused space. The sexy / modern / trendy / amazing would be if the screen would span from one edge to the other removing the bazel effectively. I don't really need the home button and I don't mind if it is not round. I'd prefer a phone that may be shorter but a little bit wider, the whole front is just a screen. I think it is a big mistake for Apple to make the iPhone to be a long stick. I don't see how this will appeal to the customers, what is the additional benefit of a long and narrow iPhone. I will definitely not buy it and will just stay with my iPhone 4 until it breaks down completely.

But this is just my opinion, so please don't rant. I'd like to be an Apple fan, but if they do this I can't. I hope the rumours are false, but it looks too real so my hope is disappearing with each new article. Of course, there will be many who will go with the crowd and praise anything just because it's Apple, but the majority of the people liked Apple for a reason. I think it's clear that the trend is bigger screen but proportionately, Apple may lose by trying to be too smart or too cautious. It doesn't matter if app developers can change their apps or not. The iPhone is the most profitable platform a new screen size will not change that. I think 4" or 4.5" at 3.2 aspect ratio would be great, then I would feel the new iPhone is "instant get". Otherwise not. I'm sorry for Apple (if the rumours are true - hopefully not).

I understand what you're saying. But my advice is to not judge it by specs alone.

If they come out with something that you're not looking for spec wise. Go to the store and play around with it. Mess with it in all manner of ways. In pocket. Out. Ect.

If its then not what pleases you, skip it.

Keep in mind most people believed when the first iPhone released that:

1) Touch screens were unusable in a professional environment, and people wouldn't live with out a keyboard.

2) it was too big and cumbersome.

3) it's software was gimmicky

Look how things have turned out.

Everyone wants bigger touch screens now. Lol

Also while I do sometime wonder how my iPhone would look and function without the bezel, I do see the importance of a use for it. The bezel is that place your finger lies on to create a safe/secure and comfortable griping without touching the screen.

Sure I can hold it without it. But I'm on the fence as to if I want it off the phone completely.
post #36 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

What is really the advantage of paying with your phone over pulling put your wallet and swiping a credit card? Is that process any less time consuming? What am I missing in regards to any advantage for using NFC through a phone and just using your card as you would normally do? 

I agree.

Even if Apple does come out with some amazing new payment technology... in the short term... only a handful of retailers will even use it. Who knows how long it will take to become as ubiquitous as accepting credit cards is now.

Right now... I can swipe my debit card anywhere cards are accepted... which is pretty much everywhere. I, personally, never have a problem with that.
post #37 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

I agree.
Even if Apple does come out with some amazing new payment technology... in the short term... only a handful of retailers will even use it. Who knows how long it will take to become as ubiquitous as accepting credit cards is now.
Right now... I can swipe my debit card anywhere cards are accepted... which is pretty much everywhere. I, personally, never have a problem with that.

Sure, but people said the same thing about CC and debit cards before they were commonplace. There was the argument that if you got robbed someone would have access to a lot more funds than the typically small sum you have in cash. I don't think the concept of being protected from fraudulent purchases was part of the initial setup.

As for the speed there was an event just last week that showed an app called Passbook that is part way for what a successful system could do.

Again, it adds more security than keeping cards with numbers, signatures, and user and bank names printed plainly on them. I want my financial data to be kept in a heavily encrypted file, like 1Password, until such time that I need it, not placed on plastic cards that anyone can read and copy if they get ahold of the item for a brief moment.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #38 of 58

I really hope they dont go to a 16:9 iPhone. It looks so awkward... It seems Apple is in an awkward place, larger screen with same ratio and developers are mad, larger screen with 16:9 ratio and the consumer is mad, and of course no matter what they do the media will of course be mad.

post #39 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

They might but neither of those technologies are as secure as NFC and neither of them are ideal for majority of businesses. NFC's unique properties allow it to create a very small loop between devices. Even Low Energy Bluetooth can have a 50 meter range so your only security measure is the encryption used to send the data. NFC's loop is only about 6" and uses a secure handshake that makes it very difficult to intercept another's data.
In many ways it's more secure than a CC card because there is no way one can copy the number by sight, a camera, carbon paper, and it's less likely to see or capture a PIN when that PIN is only be used on your handheld device. It's also easier to cancel all cards immediately if your phone is stolen by locking and erasing the device and auto-informing all financial institutions registered with the device than by having to remember what was in your wallet and then dig up numbers for each.
"NFC*. Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but soon... and for the rest of your life."
* Or an NFC-like alternative.

No. NFC is going, going, gone. There is no need for it. Almost no businesses right now are ready for it. It requires new hardware—expensive hardware. There's no evidence it's taking off. So far, Google's initiative has frozen. They're all waiting for Apple. But BT 4 is much better. even WiFi is much better. It works for Apple, and I'm willing to bet that many other companies have been looking at that.

Even if a sales person is needed to remove the stupid RFD tags, it will work better than NFC. And you don't need more chips in the phone. No one really wants that.
post #40 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by avium View Post

Um, nothing I said is incorrect. Android apps have fragmentation issues when developers opt out from the prescribed approach, e.g., while developing highly-custom UIs for games. And I can't speak to how well Android's layout scheme works in general (I'm not an Android user) but I assume it works pretty well for vanilla stuff.



 



Quoting from http://developer.android.com/guide/practices/screens_support.html#screen-independence ...



 



 



Yes, I know all about it, we've discussed this many times. What Google says is nice, but the real world is that is doesn't work well at all.
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