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Apple's 2012 profits forecast to be highest of any public company ever - Page 3

post #81 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

Ha! Thanks for the warning, will gladly comply. But I think you made this up.

The future club has no potential...

...there's no hope for Esperanza, and I have no faith in Fidel.
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
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"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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post #82 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

The reason I ask is because I thought that such integration was obvious. Apple appears to be able to convince companies to partner with them in ways that are often manifest only in retrospect. In this instance; however, the integration seemed apparent due to companies desiring to benefit from the "reality distortion field." Considering the massive capital and effort Apple has expended on Siri and iCloud expansion of the Apple ecosystem to non-traditional (for Apple) markets.

They've been partnering with them by making it easy to connect an iPod, iPhone or iPad. But to actually put a button, connected electrically to a third party device in this way, is unheard of.

Auto makers aren't going to add a bunch of these buttons, one for Win Phone, one for Android, etc, the way they are doing for Apple. That means this will preclude other manufacturers from getting a spot. Unless, that is, this button can be used for something other than an Apple product. So far, I haven't seen any evidence that it can. That's why this is so major an announcement.
post #83 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


I don't think he meant that PC sales would totally dry up. But the PC market is certainly going to shrink. It may shrink a lot over the next several years. Eventually, it may shrink so much that many PC vendors may stop making them.

I agree. But in Apple's case, their iOS devices are terrific 'gateway' products for people to check out the rest of the hardware ecosystem, i.e., Macs.

post #84 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

I don't believe for one moment that any car company will put a "Siri Button" on their steering wheels. Why would they limit themselves like that. A number of them have already come out and questioned Apples' statement.

It will be a generic button that you can pair with your iPhone or any other compatible smart phone.

The car companies make a lot of money from optional extras such as SatNav, etc - they are no going to give that money away to Apple.

Can you link to the "questioned" statements you say you've read? I haven't seen any.

Whether you believe it or not is irrelevant.
post #85 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Not sure about any private companies. There is, however, a state-owned company that has humongous profits: Saudi Aramco. My guess is that their profits must be at least $100B currently.

Note: Fixed typos.

I don't think so. Their revenues are considerably less than half of Exxon's ($185 B vs $485 B):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saudi_Aramco
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ExxonMobil
Exxon's net income was $41 B - or roughly 8% of revenues. Saudi Aramco would have to have net income of 60% of revenues to reach $100 B. That just doesn't seem likely.
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

I guess you (and the original poster) don't understand that: (i) Nominal cash flows discounted at the nominal discount rate produces the same value as real (i.e., inflation-adjusted) cash flows discounted at the real (i.e., inflation-adjusted) discount rate. (ii) The P/E ratio is an inflation-independent metric, i.e., there is no need to adjust P/E ratios for inflation in order to be able to compare it across time; in other words, it is perfectly valid to say that "MSFT in 20XX had a P/E ratio of 80x which implies a substantially higher valuation than Apple's 11x in 2012."

You're confusing two very different things, as was the original poster: market value is simply market value; what you can consume with it may be less than before, but then you're measuring something else altogether.

Where in the original article did they use discounted cash flows? Hint: they didn't. I don't care if they use discounted figures or inflation adjusted figures since you get roughly the same result. The point is that you can't compare a past market cap (or revenues or profit dollars) to current ones without an adjustment for inflation.

You certainly could compare PE ratios - but that's not what was being compared. Nor is it valid to compare PE ratios when the discussion is about "which company has the greater market cap".
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post #86 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

They've been partnering with them by making it easy to connect an iPod, iPhone or iPad. But to actually put a button, connected electrically to a third party device in this way, is unheard of.
Auto makers aren't going to add a bunch of these buttons, one for Win Phone, one for Android, etc, the way they are doing for Apple. That means this will preclude other manufacturers from getting a spot. Unless, that is, this button can be used for something other than an Apple product. So far, I haven't seen any evidence that it can. That's why this is so major an announcement.

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Can you link to the "questioned" statements you say you've read? I haven't seen any.
Whether you believe it or not is irrelevant.

From two of my posts in this thread earlier today:

No particular reason the "Eyes Free" feature can't be universal plug-n-play. "Eyes Free" is the likely reasoning (along with the European common External Power Supply (EPS) rule) behind the supposed new dock connector for the new iPhone (assuming the rumors are true).

and

Courtesy of Car and Driver posted June 18, 2012 at 12:47pm by Austin Lindberg

"... Apple’s new Eyes Free Siri integration, which will be a part of the iOS 6 software update, has generated quite a buzz since its announcement last week. Part of this is due to the limited amount of information that Apple and its partner manufacturers have provided. Basically, the new feature will allow users to access the iPhone’s personal assistant, Siri, via a voice-command button, and pass your voice from the car’s built-in microphone to the phone. Although Apple mentioned a list of nine automakers it’s working with to implement Eyes Free, few have had much to say about the announcement past generic enthusiasm. Fewer still have been forthcoming with details about how Eyes Free will be utilized or when compatible vehicles will be available. We spoke with engineers from Chevrolet and Mercedes-Benz to find out how Eyes Free will work in their vehicles.

It’s important to first point out that Siri is a software change, both for the car and the phone, and not one that affects hardware—existing voice-command buttons will be used to access the system through a Bluetooth connection. According to an engineer we spoke to, Apple’s software development includes a refinement in how Siri deals with high amounts of background noise—the in-car’s single mic can pick up road, wind, and engine noise that makes it difficult for Siri to comprehend commands. (In normal use, iPhones have a pair of built-in microphones with noise cancellation that are bypassed by the in-car mic during hands-free operation.) Apple has somehow solved the problem with the iOS6 changes that go along with Eyes Free.

Once the car and phone are running the correct software and paired over Bluetooth, the actual hardware interaction is fairly simple: The driver presses the voice-command button—usually located on the steering wheel to allow for “eyes-free” operation—and receives the normal Siri prompt over the car’s stereo speakers. The button press will have to be different from the normal momentary tap that brings up control of built-in systems such as navigation. To differentiate between the two types of requests, Chevy will use a press-and-hold (about a second or two) to access Siri; Mercedes has yet to determine the key combo its system will require. Other options we can foresee include a double tap, or maybe spelling Siri’s name with Morse code..."
post #87 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by BUSHMAN4 View Post

Apple poised to post highest profit and revenue ever thanks to the perfect storm. As we see Apple has just released new hardware with more to follow, the New Ihone 5 coming  this fall, a possible new TV or Ipanel, new operating systems for mobile and land............lets face it, it doesn't get any better than this. (I forgot to mention Apples upcoming deal with China Mobile)

 

My question is what does Apple do for an encore.

 

Steve Ballmer would give up his Monkey dance to know the answer to that question. 

 

Apple's entry into the music player business was greeted with scoff, as they came in late with a more expensive product. Ballmer howled with laughter when he heard Apple was entering the phone market with a high-priced phone... a market MS had been in for years. The tablet market could never gain market traction until Apple came out with their iPad. THEN, Apple refused to sit still and has annually improved their products in incremental steps, keeping the competition slightly off balance. Apple has "first mover advantage" and have kept the pressure up to hold that position. In chess, that's called the initiative and shows which player is running the game. By not telegraphing their next move, Apple's competitors cannot anticipate or prepare for the next big thing.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #88 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by BUSHMAN4 View Post

My question is what does Apple do for an encore.

The answer is simple:


  • Remind yourself where Apple derives revenue. Hardware.


  • Look at current trends across Apple product lines:
  • Resolutionary products (Retina Display (and beyond since the MacBook Pro with Retina Display far surpasses the Apple definition of Retina Display)
  • Thinnovation (remove legacy detritus and trend toward Solid State Drives)


  • Don't forget that supply chains are an anchor for Apple's success.


  • Don't get your head out of the iClouds.


  • Never take life too Siri-ously.

Edited by MacBook Pro - 6/18/12 at 2:56pm
post #89 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

 

From the perspective of a [former] business owner selling Apple products.

 

What you say has a greater advantage than only the profit $.  

 

You and your $100 customer have a $50 relationship -- that is understood and appreciated by each party.   

 

Your competitor has a $10 relationship, each, with 5 parties -- understood by each, for what it is worth.

 

You are selling solutions, relationships, repeat business, reference sales...

 

Your competitor is selling price.

In addition to all of the above, the business owner and the manufacturer have fewer but profitable customers to support, which lowers your operating costs. 

 

One profitable customer vs. six customers, as in the above example. Besides, everyone knows that if it has power cords or tits, you're gonna have problems to resolve. :-)

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #90 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

The answer is simple:
  • Remind yourself where Apple derives revenue. Hardware.

  • Look at current trends across Apple product lines:
  • Resolutionary products (Retina Display (and beyond since the MacBook Pro with Retina Display far surpasses the Apple definition of Retina Display)
  • Thinnovation (remove legacy detritus and trend toward Solid State Drives)

  • Don't forget that supply chains are an anchor for Apple's success.

  • Don't get your head out of the iClouds.

  • Never take life too Siri-ously.

Now YOU are close to giving it away. See what I mean?
post #91 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

The future club has no potential...
...there's no hope for Esperanza, and I have no faith in Fidel.

. . . and no charity for . . . Caridad?
post #92 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by BUSHMAN4 View Post

Apple poised to post highest profit and revenue ever thanks to the perfect storm. As we see Apple has just released new hardware with more to follow, the New Ihone 5 coming  this fall, a possible new TV or Ipanel, new operating systems for mobile and land............lets face it, it doesn't get any better than this. (I forgot to mention Apples upcoming deal with China Mobile)

My question is what does Apple do for an encore.

iTV, followed by iCar, and then, the pièce de Resistance: I, Robot!

 

I repeat my yearly prediction: the first non-living co-respondent in a divorce proceeding will be an Apple FemBot!!!


Edited by airmanchairman - 6/18/12 at 3:55pm
post #93 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


Can you link to the "questioned" statements you say you've read? I haven't seen any.
Whether you believe it or not is irrelevant.

 

http://www.businessinsider.com/apparently-no-one-told-chrysler-that-its-supposed-to-build-siri-into-its-cars-2012-6

 

http://www.fastcompany.com/1840149/driving-miss-siri-inside-apple-iphone-integration-with-mercedes-benz-bmw-general-motors?partner=gnews

post #94 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post


The wild card in the deck, unseen in this negative view, is the next phase of the portable computer revolution, which is just getting started. I'm not going to say what it is because you don't deserve to know. Even if you were told, you wouldn't understand.
The main point is that there is no bubble this time. We are seeing a new industry establishing right before our eyes—if they're open, that is.

 

No doubt you're so clever you can see into the future from that high horse you're sitting on.


Edited by Shaun, UK - 6/18/12 at 4:45pm
post #95 of 113
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post #96 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


I don't think so. Their revenues are considerably less than half of Exxon's ($185 B vs $485 B):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saudi_Aramco
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ExxonMobil
Exxon's net income was $41 B - or roughly 8% of revenues. Saudi Aramco would have to have net income of 60% of revenues to reach $100 B. That just doesn't seem likely.

Exxon pumps about 2.5M bpd, while Saudi pumps ~7.5M (you can find this info very easily on the web; the 7.5M number is probably an underestimate for Saudi). The correct metric to use to infer revenues from bpd is to look at the "revenue equivalent" from production of oil, natural gas and other products. If we use Exxon's multiples (as you did), Saudi's revenue must be closer to $1.4 trillion, or something in that range. 8% of that is over $100B.

 

It is commonly acknowledged that Saudi Aramco is the largest oil and gas producer in the world (although, they may have been eclipsed by PetroChina, hard to tell).

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Where in the original article did they use discounted cash flows? Hint: they didn't. I don't care if they use discounted figures or inflation adjusted figures since you get roughly the same result. The point is that you can't compare a past market cap (or revenues or profit dollars) to current ones without an adjustment for inflation.
You certainly could compare PE ratios - but that's not what was being compared. Nor is it valid to compare PE ratios when the discussion is about "which company has the greater market cap".

 

Every valuation is implicitly or explicitly a DCF valuation. If it is not explicitly a DCF valuation it's likely a relative valuation based on multiples (i.e., EPS*[P/E], which is an implicit DCF valuation). In either event, my two points about valuations being independent of inflation are right -- i.e., the point about nominal cash flows discounted at the nominal discount rate being the same as valuations based on real -- i.e., inflation-adjusted --  cash flows discounted at the real discount rate numbers for both, and the point about P/E ratios being independent of inflation.

 

Moreover, we could argue that the real price of most tech products had fallen over time relative to functionality offered, i.e., there has been negative inflation in this business.

 

Independently of all that, there is no law against looking at inflation-adjusted valuations. The question is, what does it mean, if anything at all.

post #97 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post


The proof is everywhere. For example;
The $50 million Apple donated to help Stanford Medical Center build its new $2 billion hospital.
Apple's leading participation in Project RED, to which they have contributed $50 million to help women and children affected by HIV/AIDS in Africa.
http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/12/02/02/tim_cook_exposes_the_lie_that_steve_jobs_ignored_philanthropy_.html
Apple executives and officers donated more than $3 million worth of company shares to charitable causes during the holiday season of 2010.
http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/10/12/31/apple_execs_officers_donate_over_3_million_the_charity_for_the_holidays.html
Apple matches personal charitable contributions of employees up to $10,000 per year which could amount to several hundred million dollars annually.
http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/11/09/08/charitable_matching_of_up_to_10k_now_available_for_apple_employees.html

 

Tim Cook highlighting $150 million in charitable contributions over several years does little to undo the public's perception of Apple as a scrooge in the charitable contributions category.

 

You do realize that many of the other companies that even get close to Apple's profits give several hundreds of millions ANNUALLY to charity, ranging from 5-10% of their profit? Apple can't even claim getting anywhere close to 1% of their profit donated to charity.

post #98 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

I agree. But in Apple's case, their iOS devices are terrific 'gateway' products for people to check out the rest of the hardware ecosystem, i.e., Macs.

Of course, and that's happening. I also know people who started out with Macs, such as my household.
post #99 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

From two of my posts in this thread earlier today:
No particular reason the "Eyes Free" feature can't be universal plug-n-play. "Eyes Free" is the likely reasoning (along with the European common External Power Supply (EPS) rule) behind the supposed new dock connector for the new iPhone (assuming the rumors are true).
and
Courtesy of Car and Driver posted June 18, 2012 at 12:47pm by Austin Lindberg
"... Apple’s new Eyes Free Siri integration, which will be a part of the iOS 6 software update, has generated quite a buzz since its announcement last week. Part of this is due to the limited amount of information that Apple and its partner manufacturers have provided. Basically, the new feature will allow users to access the iPhone’s personal assistant, Siri, via a voice-command button, and pass your voice from the car’s built-in microphone to the phone. Although Apple mentioned a list of nine automakers it’s working with to implement Eyes Free, few have had much to say about the announcement past generic enthusiasm. Fewer still have been forthcoming with details about how Eyes Free will be utilized or when compatible vehicles will be available. We spoke with engineers from Chevrolet and Mercedes-Benz to find out how Eyes Free will work in their vehicles.
It’s important to first point out that Siri is a software change, both for the car and the phone, and not one that affects hardware—existing voice-command buttons will be used to access the system through a Bluetooth connection. According to an engineer we spoke to, Apple’s software development includes a refinement in how Siri deals with high amounts of background noise—the in-car’s single mic can pick up road, wind, and engine noise that makes it difficult for Siri to comprehend commands. (In normal use, iPhones have a pair of built-in microphones with noise cancellation that are bypassed by the in-car mic during hands-free operation.) Apple has somehow solved the problem with the iOS6 changes that go along with Eyes Free.
Once the car and phone are running the correct software and paired over Bluetooth, the actual hardware interaction is fairly simple: The driver presses the voice-command button—usually located on the steering wheel to allow for “eyes-free” operation—and receives the normal Siri prompt over the car’s stereo speakers. The button press will have to be different from the normal momentary tap that brings up control of built-in systems such as navigation. To differentiate between the two types of requests, Chevy will use a press-and-hold (about a second or two) to access Siri; Mercedes has yet to determine the key combo its system will require. Other options we can foresee include a double tap, or maybe spelling Siri’s name with Morse code..."

Yes, and those are special commands on a button on the steering wheel, that won't have a place for anyone else, as it will work with Apple's devices.
post #100 of 113

There's nothing in either of those articles to support what you've said. As we all know, Apple is fanatic about secrecy, and as Cook said at All Things D, he was doubling down on secrecy. So asking a couple of "spokesperson's" about this who rarely know anything anyway, means nothing. What was interesting was the statements that said that something was being done.

No one in the articles actually said that they weren't working with Apple on this. Some of the rest was speculation from the article writers themselves, who know even less.
post #101 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Bullcrap!  Apple has never made their charitable giving a public boast. "Giving in secret" is the highest order of giving. Also by instituting corp matching donations, Apple is amplifying the effects of their employee's donations. 

Can you please explain how a publicly traded company with mandatory SEC filings is able to "give in secret"???

post #102 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


There's nothing in either of those articles to support what you've said. As we all know, Apple is fanatic about secrecy, and as Cook said at All Things D, he was doubling down on secrecy. So asking a couple of "spokesperson's" about this who rarely know anything anyway, means nothing. What was interesting was the statements that said that something was being done.
No one in the articles actually said that they weren't working with Apple on this. Some of the rest was speculation from the article writers themselves, who know even less.

 

Ok whatever, we'll see who is right and who is wrong in a year or two.

post #103 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by e_veritas View Post

 

Tim Cook highlighting $150 million in charitable contributions over several years does little to undo the public's perception of Apple as a scrooge in the charitable contributions category.

 

You do realize that many of the other companies that even get close to Apple's profits give several hundreds of millions ANNUALLY .....

Who cares.

 

It's not Tim Cook's -- or the Board's -- money to give away. I think it's fabulous that a CEO actually understands that.

post #104 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

If the price of a Mac is a "barrier to developing iPhone and iPad software"... then, the developer is in the wrong business.  Hell, he needs to invest in some basic tools, even to work on his own bicycle.

Not all iOS developers work for large US based companies. There are several small developers in the US, and even in other countries (I am from India). Also, when you are buying just a few Apple products for personal use the prices aren't a big deal. But if you have to equip a whole team of developers with Macs and iPhones/iPads, it gets really expensive.

MacMini is an OK option, if you just want to build small apps. Or you dont want to use tools like the Profiler for eliminating memory leaks. If you need those, you need to get the 4GB $799 Mac mini - which costs almost $1000 in India.

Don't get me wrong. Apple is free to do whatever works for them. And if you see my post history, you will see that I am as much a fan of Apple as anyone out there. Unlike most people who are just Apple fans, I have a lot more at stake, owning a small iOS development business. While Apple makes announcements that they paid out $5B to developers, it is clear from my own experience that it is quite difficult for small developers to make much money out of the AppStore. And this has nothing to do with App quality. One of my apps qualifies as easily one of the best Stock Market apps in the App Store (currently targeting India, but eventually targeting US, Europe, Japan, etc).

The thing is, as more people start to love Apple, Apple has a nasty habit of hurting the people who love it the most and for the longest time! And believe me, there are quite a few people who feel that way about Apple. Just ask the Pro users who stayed with Apple thru the tough years, how they feel about Apple's consumer focus! Or ask the enterprise IT support person who has spent a lifetime recommending Apple product adoption in the enterprise, and Apple suddenly pulls the plug on the Xserve or stops updating the Mac Pro. Does Apple seriously expect enterprise customers to buy iMacs? Or Mac Minis?

My only point is, when Macs have become such a small portion of their revenues and profits, why not lower prices and go for market share. Why price products at such ridiculous premiums in markets like India and China? I can even understand India pricing - with customs duties, etc. But Chinese pricing? iPhone 4S costs Rs 44,500 for the basic model. Which is about $800, AFTER the recent fall in the Rupee. At launch, it was almost $900! And to make things worse, Apple's Worldwide Warranty is valid everywhere in the world except India! Is India not a part of the world? So if you buy an unlocked phone for $650 elsewhere, you can forget support in India!

I am actually delighted that someone like Tim Cook is at the helm of affairs. Being a logistics person, the best way for Tim to showcase his skills is in increasing volumes and lowering prices.
post #105 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Who cares.

 

It's not Tim Cook's -- or the Board's -- money to give away. I think it's fabulous that a CEO actually understands that.

The debate over whether or not or a company should be an active and beneficial member of their community is a long one that I have no interest in touching.

 

My issue is with Tim Cook and others here PRETENDING that Apple is a charitable company when the reality is, they give peanuts compared to others. I'm glad to see that you agree with me that Apple is NOT a charitable company, but you should be bringing this to the attention of others making inaccurate statements, and not killing the messenger for highlighting this fact....

post #106 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by macarena View Post

Not all iOS developers work for large US based companies. There are several small developers in the US, and even in other countries (I am from India). Also, when you are buying just a few Apple products for personal use the prices aren't a big deal. But if you have to equip a whole team of developers with Macs and iPhones/iPads, it gets really expensive.
MacMini is an OK option, if you just want to build small apps. Or you dont want to use tools like the Profiler for eliminating memory leaks. If you need those, you need to get the 4GB $799 Mac mini - which costs almost $1000 in India.
Don't get me wrong. Apple is free to do whatever works for them. And if you see my post history, you will see that I am as much a fan of Apple as anyone out there. Unlike most people who are just Apple fans, I have a lot more at stake, owning a small iOS development business. While Apple makes announcements that they paid out $5B to developers, it is clear from my own experience that it is quite difficult for small developers to make much money out of the AppStore. And this has nothing to do with App quality. One of my apps qualifies as easily one of the best Stock Market apps in the App Store (currently targeting India, but eventually targeting US, Europe, Japan, etc).
The thing is, as more people start to love Apple, Apple has a nasty habit of hurting the people who love it the most and for the longest time! And believe me, there are quite a few people who feel that way about Apple. Just ask the Pro users who stayed with Apple thru the tough years, how they feel about Apple's consumer focus! Or ask the enterprise IT support person who has spent a lifetime recommending Apple product adoption in the enterprise, and Apple suddenly pulls the plug on the Xserve or stops updating the Mac Pro. Does Apple seriously expect enterprise customers to buy iMacs? Or Mac Minis?
My only point is, when Macs have become such a small portion of their revenues and profits, why not lower prices and go for market share. Why price products at such ridiculous premiums in markets like India and China? I can even understand India pricing - with customs duties, etc. But Chinese pricing? iPhone 4S costs Rs 44,500 for the basic model. Which is about $800, AFTER the recent fall in the Rupee. At launch, it was almost $900! And to make things worse, Apple's Worldwide Warranty is valid everywhere in the world except India! Is India not a part of the world? So if you buy an unlocked phone for $650 elsewhere, you can forget support in India!
I am actually delighted that someone like Tim Cook is at the helm of affairs. Being a logistics person, the best way for Tim to showcase his skills is in increasing volumes and lowering prices.

Thank you for this perspective. If you are right, and there's no reason to think you are not, then Apple should maybe enlarge its concern for its users beyond hardware and software. They ought to be asking themselves about their 'business usability' in other words, and their attention ought to be as global as their sourcing and sales network. Hopefully someone is aware of this problem in Cupertino.
post #107 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mode View Post

The 'proof' is everywhere. Articles galore. Even here on Appleinsider.
What rock you been hiding under?
Apple is one of the greediest companies ever. Deal with it.

Your cynicism regarding charity is positively disgusting.

Thanks, cynicism is often confused with realism.

J.
post #108 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerrySwitched26 View Post

 

 

Apple's phone business is currently the biggest single source of profits.  In my opinion, the market has a huge growth potential as emerging markets shift to smartphones and Apple continues to market older models (which have a low marginal cost) to these new markets.  Apple has solid products at various price points in the phone game.  Not only are they well positioned to capture sales in new markets, even established markets are experiencing double-digit rates of conversion to smartphones, and in these markets, Apple can  sell huge numbers of its latest and greatest iterations at early-adopter prices.

 

With tablets, things are much less clear.  Apple currently dominates, and so, only a growth in the market itself could result in greatly increased sales for Apple.  Will the tablet market grow as fast as smartphone market?  Will margins remain attractive, like they have in the phone biz?  Time will tell.  

 

 

The PC market is not going to grow nearly as fast as the smartphone or the tablet markets.  It is not a prime source of profits anymore.  Apple can concentrate on niches within the overall market, but overall, there's less potential.

 

The key is that the tablet market is the new PC market. Steve saw this as far back as 2007 (see All Things D full interview, note contrast with Bill Gates who basically had no idea what he was doing [I admire his philanthropy though I continue to call for Bill to step away completely from Microsoft]).

 

Smartphones are important because it is the number one electronic device everyone in the world needs.

 

Tablets will be critical because the tablet is the new PC and PCs can only hold their own or simply start to gradually erode. Websites, alone, are so grossly bloated that native apps and web apps have become so enjoyable with regards to iOS tablets. 

 

So the writing is on the wall for the PC market, smartphones have had a massive shakeup in just five years, and the next five years will see a big shakeup of the PC market. Anyone that needs a PC will be hard-pressed to look for something thin, light, or simply dirt, dirt cheap. Anyone that is reticent to get a complicated PC will simply get a tablet.

 

Apple is in an amazing position right now. Wall Street is trying to ride them but not many people realise Apple itself buys and sells a massive amount of securities. Apple's trading of their $100 billion of securities puts them in the top 20 financial traders in the world.

 

Look at the last few lines. In six months they spent almost $100 billion in securities. Now I'm not sure what the leverage was on that but I can bet it's pretty low.

 

Apple could walk into any bank (or country for that matter, not in Europe, I guess) and ask for a $1 Trillion loan... And they would get it.

 

You know the movie Contact with Jodie Foster? If we had alien plans to build a super space-time travelling device, Apple would be the prime company to build it. Of course, you would only be able to go to the planets Apple has pre-approved. LOL.

 

Screen Shot 2012-06-27 at 6.51.02 PM.png

post #109 of 113

As usual, I can't seem to edit my post, I meant to say above, "anyone who wants a PC will be hard-pressed not to purchase a PC that is thin, light, or simply a dirt cheap piece of junk."

post #110 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by sr2012 View Post

As usual, I can't seem to edit my post, I meant to say above, "anyone who wants a PC will be hard-pressed not to purchase a PC that is thin, light, or simply a dirt cheap piece of junk."

You don't have an edit button?

27

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #111 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


You don't have an edit button?
27

 

If I embed images after one or two images when I click the Edit button the WSIWYG editor is like just a big block of grey. In Safari, no less.

post #112 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by sr2012 View Post

If I embed images after one or two images when I click the Edit button the WSIWYG editor is like just a big block of grey. In Safari, no less.

The Huddler forum software is not very good. I'm not convinced they had much experience operating forum software before they started to write their own.
post #113 of 113
I don't need Apple to be charitable to gain my respect but I do need them to address the work, pay, and living conditions they (*we* as both investors and consumers of Apple's products) exploit in China.

The tension between human rights violations and progress as defined solely by profit is grinding my moral fiber down. I don't know how much longer I can support Apple financially.
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