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Nest Learning Thermostat reportedly taken off Apple Store shelves - Page 4

post #121 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


That looks $150 cheaper in the quality of presentation.
Given they use an LCD out of the 90's, I don't know if I want to see or use their web interface, their human interface looks crummy and ugly. It looks like something slapped together and with that sort of look, the software probably isn't any good.

 

 

all it needs is an up and down button to adjust the temperature. i could care less if that button is fancy or not, so long as it works and saves me real money, up front. 

 

 

if you really want to be more efficient, and have full access, look at systems like Nexia http://www.nexiahome.com from Trane/IR/Schlage and such. Much more complete systems, and not much more expensive than Nest. A lot more fun for a DIYer too. 

post #122 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


But I don't want the thermostat to kick in once someone is home. I want it to kick in so the temperature is ideal as close to when, but before, someone gets home.
Here's a scenario: Let's say I work all day and then have somewhere else to be for many hours in the evening. Let's say my evening destination takes me past my house so this geofencing will sense me coming home every time I drive in the direction of my home. I assume the next argument is that I can then manually disable the system but I don't want to do that each time.
I want it to primary learn patterns and then predict when those patterns will most likely hit so it can activate based on programmed and learned behaviour, not because I'm somewhere closer to it.
Then you have issues where not everyone has an smartphones which is really the only way to this. What if you have kids who come home after school or a babysitter or maid or many other people who won't be tied to your system with a linked smartphone? Like I said, I like the idea but not as a primary feature. Nest is on the right track.

It seems like the complexity of the system is more than most people want to study and program. With multiple family members, unpredictable schedules and lack of accurate initial programming, the Nest could actually cost more than not using a thermostat at all. I wonder what percentage of people just turn the heat or A/C on/off manually. I know I do, but I so rarely need any temperature control I have not bothered to program my thermostat. My house in Central America doesn't even have heat or A/C because it is such an ideal temperature naturally. If you get cold or hot you just put on or take of clothing as necessary.

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post #123 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandor View Post


all it needs is an up and down button to adjust the temperature. i could care less if that button is fancy or not, so long as it works and saves me real money, up front. 


if you really want to be more efficient, and have full access, look at systems like Nexia http://www.nexiahome.com from Trane/IR/Schlage and such. Much more complete systems, and not much more expensive than Nest. A lot more fun for a DIYer too. 
In total, nice but temperature control delivers much less than Nest. Why would you tout a device with less useful features?

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post #124 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

It seems like the complexity of the system is more than most people want to study and program. With multiple family members, unpredictable schedules and lack of accurate initial programming, the Nest could actually cost more than not using a thermostat at all. I wonder what percentage of people just turn the heat or A/C on/off manually. I know I do, but I so rarely need any temperature control I have not bothered to program my thermostat. My house in Central America doesn't even have heat or A/C because it is such an ideal temperature naturally. If you get cold or hot you just put on or take of clothing as necessary.

That's nice, but maybe you haven't noticed that not everyone lives in a climate that doesn't need heat or A/C. /s

You are undoubtedly right. NEST isn't for everyone. People who don't have heat and A/C can't use it. People who aren't willing to even learn how to set the temperature can't use it unless they pay someone to set it up (although one has to wonder how they handle a conventional thermostat). People whose energy bills are extremely low won't get much value out of it.

But why do people jump so quickly from "this isn't useful for 100% of the population" to "this product is no good"? It's actually a great product - and the fact that it's not for everyone doesn't detract from that.
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post #125 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by diplication View Post


In total, nice but temperature control delivers much less than Nest. Why would you tout a device with less useful features?

what features? 

 

there is honestly nothing that Nest provides that is actually useful or more efficient than a properly programmed thermostat with a web interface. they just throw it in a fancy package, create too-complicated electronics for it, and sell it to people too stupid to look for other options. I don't need a green leaf to tell me that i am saving energy when my HVAC system is off.

post #126 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by wozwoz View Post

It might looook cool, but it's just more wireless junk unnecessarily radiating your brain in your own home ... I need it like a tumour. No wireless in my house.

...and the fact that you just subjected yourself to a stronger EM field sitting at your computer typing that dumb comment than you would ever be exposed to from a Nest or wireless in your home doesn't concern you, right?  Because you don't actually understand electromagnetism.  Do you also refuse to have a microwave because it colloquially 'nukes' your food with radiation, even though their is no nuclear fission involved and thus the radiation isn't ionizing?

post #127 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I found a review. For the price it doesn't seem bad and their iPhone app looks much better than their monochrome LCD but I'd gladly pay for Nest any day. The big issue is the Filtrete thermostat doesn't learn. It's programmable and you can access it remotely but you can't "set it and forget it."

 

I bought that thermostat about a year ago, and I love it so far.  They've upgraded the iOS app several times since then, and it's much better than what they show in the article.  I'm not sure how much it's knocked off my energy bill as I bought it when I bought my condo, but I only pay $60 a month for electricity (leaving the temp at 72) so it can't be doing that poorly.

 

I do like the Nest though.  Like others, I question the price a bit ($149 or $199 seems more reasonable), but I guess it depends on the application.  If you're a family living in a two story house it's probably more than worth it to have a couple of these things going, and I can see them saving you some money.  It probably wouldn't be any benefit to a single guy living in a condo, but I may eventually cave and buy one just because it looks cool lol.

post #128 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


 It's actually a great product - and the fact that it's not for everyone doesn't detract from that.

I was just curious what percentage of the population just use their temperature control manually versus those who program it. 

 

Personally, I prefer less complexity in my life. If I like to sit outside on the patio and leave the the sliding doors open I would do it. To have to override the thermostat that is wasting energy because it is trying to maintain an exact temperature while the doors are open is a hassle. I can be comfortable in a range of temperatures. Sometime there is a nice breeze and I like the windows open. To have my life dictated by a machine is something I try to avoid. If I want A/C I will turn it on myself.

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post #129 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I was just curious what percentage of the population just use their temperature control manually versus those who program it. 

According to Nest, and I am inclined to believe them, most people don't reprogram their thermostats their routines change or don't program them correctly.
Quote:

Personally, I prefer less complexity in my life. If I like to sit outside on the patio and leave the the sliding doors open I would do it. To have to override the thermostat that is wasting energy because it is trying to maintain an exact temperature while the doors are open is a hassle. I can be comfortable in a range of temperatures. Sometime there is a nice breeze and I like the windows open. To have my life dictated by a machine is something I try to avoid. If I want A/C I will turn it on myself.

I could see tying a learning thermostat to your home's security system (or more accurately the sensors that know whether a door or window is open) would reduce some of the complexity for the user.

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post #130 of 226
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Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post

Sorry I was a bit hard on you. I will stop here.
No worries here. This is just a simple discussion.
No need to plunge the knife in 227 times.
After all, it's not like I'm trying to defend Samsung or say Android is far superior to iOS or anything crazy like that.
;-)
post #131 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I could see tying a learning thermostat to your home's security system (or more accurately the sensors that know whether a door or window is open) would reduce some of the complexity for the user.

Again with the complexity. Sorry the A/C won't work because someone cracked the bathroom window upstairs. You would need to have your smartphone app to find out which door or window was opened before the A/C would work. You would need to set thresholds for all kinds of stuff. How long has the door been open before shutting down the system. How much air leakage is occurring and under what circumstances, etc. Sometimes we would leave the kitchen window slightly open to hear the kids playing outside. Too many variables. No thanks. I'll spend my life living rather than wasting time configuring settings.

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post #132 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

That's nice, but maybe you haven't noticed that not everyone lives in a climate that doesn't need heat or A/C. /s
You are undoubtedly right. NEST isn't for everyone. People who don't have heat and A/C can't use it.
Exactly!
If I could use one, I'd get it.
I live in Colorado. Don't use heat at all in summer, late spring and early fall. Maybe +7 months.
I have a swamp cooler, not A/C.
I do have a programmable thermostat (that I have actually programmed correctly) and that works for my needs.
I'll need a new furnace maybe this year (original furnace) so I'll definitely look into one but not sure if it would pay for itself in any savings, especially with a new efficient furnace.
post #133 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Again with the complexity. Sorry the A/C won't work because someone cracked the bathroom window upstairs. You would need to have your smartphone app to find out which door or window was opened before the A/C would work. You would need to set thresholds for all kinds of stuff. How long has the door been open before shutting down the system. How much air leakage is occurring and under what circumstances, etc. Sometimes we would leave the kitchen window slightly open to hear the kids playing outside. Too many variables. No thanks. I'll spend my life living rather than wasting time configuring settings.

You completely missed my point. The point is for devices to assist the user, not confound them. Same goes with cars, PCs, pretty much everything. We live in a world where pretty much every we touch is engineered by man. Even the food we eat.

I clearly stated "reduce complexity for the user" which should give a clear indication that the user would not be dealing with less variables than they are now. That's the whole point of technology building upon itself. It's complex but the average person does not deal with its complexity unless they enjoy it or unless there is something that can be improved. That's what makes the iPhone the best smartphone, the Mac the best PC and Nest the best thermostat on the market.

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post #134 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

Exactly!
If I could use one, I'd get it.
I live in Colorado. Don't use heat at all in summer, late spring and early fall. Maybe +7 months.
I have a swamp cooler, not A/C.
I do have a programmable thermostat (that I have actually programmed correctly) and that works for my needs.
I'll need a new furnace maybe this year (original furnace) so I'll definitely look into one but not sure if it would pay for itself in any savings, especially with a new efficient furnace.

Swamp cooler? You mean you have an airboat fan in your living room?
399

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post #135 of 226
I keep it between the alligator and the Cyprus tree. ;-)
Actually, it's on the roof and blows into the hallway.
post #136 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

Nest doesn't "intercommunicate" with anything. It runs by itself.
You can control it (if you wish) and read the settings with iOS but the idea is to plug it in and forget about it.
That's incorrect. Out of the box, Nest will use your Internet connection to monitor your local weather and adjust its behavior accordingly. In addition, it is Zigbee enabled and can be used in home automation configurations where it does things like lower/raise window shades.
Edited by focher - 6/25/12 at 7:47am
post #137 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


You completely missed my point. The point is for devices to assist the user, not confound them. Same goes with cars, PCs, pretty much everything. We live in a world where pretty much every we touch is engineered by man. Even the food we eat.
 

No, I understood your point precisely. I just don't agree with you. I'm suggesting there is a point where technology is getting in the way rather than assisting. I remember back in the late 80s when GM came out with all these digital control systems in their autos. The speedometer was digital numerical display, the temperature was click and hold to adjust a numerical reading as was the radio. All of it was much more difficult and distracting to use than the analog twist the knob type controls that proceeded it. They quickly changed back to the old style of controls the following year, and although they were digital behind the scenes they presented themselves as analog. I am not a digital interface and I don't live by numbers. Judging by the way most people drive, and spend money, they do seem to be a bit numerically challenged or else they just don't care about the posted speed limit or their current bank balance. You know what they say: There are three type of people in this world. Those who are good with numbers and those who are not.

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post #138 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

No, I understood your point precisely. I just don't agree with you. I'm suggesting there is a point where technology is getting in the way rather than assisting. I remember back in the late 80s when GM came out with all these digital control systems in their autos. The speedometer was digital numerical display, the temperature was click and hold to adjust a numerical reading as was the radio. All of it was much more difficult and distracting to use than the analog twist the knob type controls that proceeded it. They quickly changed back to the old style of controls the following year, and although they were digital behind the scenes they presented themselves as analog. I am not a digital interface and I don't live by numbers. Judging by the way most people drive, and spend money, they do seem to be a bit numerically challenged or else they just don't care about the posted speed limit or their current bank balance. You know what they say: There are three type of people in this world. Those who are good with math and those who are not.

Once again, even if you are correct (and you're undoubtedly exaggerating quite a bit), why do you insist on interpreting "it's not right for everyone" as "it's no good and no one needs it"?
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post #139 of 226
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Originally Posted by HKZ View Post

Not really. 

 

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/draconian

 

1.

of or relating to Draco, 7th-century Athenian statesman andlawmaker, or his code of laws, which prescribed death for almost every offence

 

I like that you linked to your own fail.

post #140 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

No, I understood your point precisely. I just don't agree with you. I'm suggesting there is a point where technology is getting in the way rather than assisting. I remember back in the late 80s when GM came out with all these digital control systems in their autos. The speedometer was digital numerical display, the temperature was click and hold to adjust a numerical reading as was the radio. All of it was much more difficult and distracting to use than the analog twist the knob type controls that proceeded it. They quickly changed back to the old style of controls the following year, and although they were digital behind the scenes they presented themselves as analog. I am not a digital interface and I don't live by numbers. Judging by the way most people drive, and spend money, they do seem to be a bit numerically challenged or else they just don't care about the posted speed limit or their current bank balance. You know what they say: There are three type of people in this world. Those who are good with math and those who are not.

You're arguing with me despite my third comment about "reduce some of the complexity for the user." If you bring up an example or scenario where it adds, overall, more complexity to the user's life then it's clearly not a user focused technology and certainly not one that I have in mind. Nest is a learning thermostat which means the user will need adjust it less often which therefore reduces the complexity for the user.


PS: I still love the "There are 10 types of people in the world. Those that understand binary and those that don't. 😷

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post #141 of 226
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Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Once again, even if you are correct (and you're undoubtedly exaggerating quite a bit), why do you insist on interpreting "it's not right for everyone" as "it's no good and no one needs it"?

I did not say is was 'no good', I'm saying I don't think many people want to spend the effort to make it work as intended even if it could actually work as I wanted it to like reading my mind. I was under the impression the Nest was all about saving money. I think if I use the A/C or heat only when I actually needed it I would save even more. If I walk into a house that is comfortable I could not tell you with any precision what the actual temperature was and it really doesn't matter to me either. In many offices the thermostat is set at 72 and no one is allowed to touch it. If they feel a little cold they just ignore it or wear a sweater because the the readout says it is 72. It might be raining outside which has no impact on the temperature inside but psychologically one may feel colder. I'm the type of person who likes the flexibility to make adjustments on a case by case basis and not being a slave to technology.

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post #142 of 226
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Originally Posted by wozwoz View Post

 

Alas, you are rather confused. No-one has an FM radio transmission mast in their house ... they just receive radio. And it is well-known that living next to a radio tower is bad news, and highly correlated with cancer clusters. If you live just a km away from a mast, you are usually fine ... by the inverse square power law. Same for a mobile phone ... keep it a metre or 2 away from your head, and you will be fine ... even though it has to transmit the signal all the way back to the base station which might be a few km away.

 

And no ... I don't use wireless at home  (I get headaches from them) ... I've got Cat 6 ethernet wired throughout  ... and I do try to avoid mobile phones if possible (they also give me headaches ... or suggest use a Moshi to keep the phone away from your body, or use an external antennae in the car).

 

You are, of course, free to nuke your testes or your brain, as you please. Life is full of choices.

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post #143 of 226
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Originally Posted by maccherry View Post

It's a money grubbing tech gimmick and when Nest goes bankrupt in a few years who the hell is going to support that thing? The same folks supporting the old Newton tablets? 

Is Nest bleeding chips? How do you know they'll go bankrupt? Why would it need support?

And yes, that's a likely source, should that happen. Why would that be a surprise?

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post #144 of 226
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Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I'm the type of person who likes the flexibility to make adjustments on a case by case basis and not being a slave to technology.

There is nothing about Nest that prevents that. The entire premise is it's a programmable thermostat that learns. As they sate most programmable thermostats aren't programmed or programmed correctly. If you choose to have a programmable thermostat that is fine. Or if you choose not have no central HVAC that is fine, too. The point is it's an option for those that want it to save money and reduce their effort in controlling their HVAC.

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post #145 of 226
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


There is nothing about Nest that prevents that. The entire premise is it's a programmable thermostat that learns. As they sate most programmable thermostats aren't programmed or programmed correctly. If you choose to have a programmable thermostat that is fine. Or if you choose not have no central HVAC that is fine, too. The point is it's an option for those that want it to save money and reduce their effort in controlling their HVAC.

Perhaps the reason that Apple removed it from the store shelves is that ti doesn't sell very well as most people are content to control the temperature in their home the way they have been doing for years and are not inclined to run out and buy a fancy new thermostat when they haven't even made an attempt to program the one they already own. It probably appeals to younger people because of the novelty however many younger people live in apartments where they cannot change the thermostat anyway.

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post #146 of 226
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Originally Posted by sandor View Post

what features? 

there is honestly nothing that Nest provides that is actually useful or more efficient than a properly programmed thermostat with a web interface. they just throw it in a fancy package, create too-complicated electronics for it, and sell it to people too stupid to look for other options. I don't need a green leaf to tell me that i am saving energy when my HVAC system is off.
1). It learns
2). It adjusts according to the weather
3). It adjusts according to past performance
4). It senses when I'm home
5). I don't have to worry about programming it

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post #147 of 226
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Originally Posted by focher View Post

Wrong. Just out of the box, Nest will use your Internet connection to monitor your local weather and adjust its behavior accordingly. In addition, it is Zigbee enabled and can be used in home automation configurations where it does things like lower/raise window shades.
Get over it.
Everyone else is.
post #148 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by diplication View Post


4). It senses when I'm home
 

 

 

Here is an example: Let's say it is a hot day and the clever thermostat turns on the A/C. You decide to go outside and mow the yard for 30 minutes. Nest detects that you are gone so it shuts off the A/C. When you come back inside hot and sweaty, there is no A/C or does it somehow automatically know you will be back inside in 30 minutes and lets the A/C stay on?

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post #149 of 226
If your house does not stay (somewhat) cool for 30 minutes, you have other issues.
post #150 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

 

 

Here is an example: Let's say it is a hot day and the clever thermostat turns on the A/C. You decide to go outside and mow the yard for 30 minutes. Nest detects that you are gone so it shuts off the A/C. When you come back inside hot and sweaty, there is no A/C or does it somehow automatically know you will be back inside in 30 minutes and lets the A/C stay on?

 

It adapts to your normal comings and goings. In my case, it has settled in on between two and three hours of no people, to determine auto-away.  I suspect its awareness of outside temp/humidity may alter the timing.   In the worst case, you *can* disable just the auto-away function. But in my case, that is one of the most valuable features.   With each software rev, the logging and reporting has improved significantly

post #151 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by freediverx View Post

Purchased a Nest thermostat but had to return it because I couldn't get it to work properly with my building's HVAC system. It would either blow hot air or lukewarm air but never cold, even after changing the wiring five times per the advice of their phone support team. The product is slick and comes with clear instructions and great phone support, but it just didn't work for me, and I live in a 3 year old building so it's not a matter of dealing with outdated technology.

 

Perhaps the Nest isn't as widely compatible as originally thought and Apple had to take it off the shelves after receiving complaints? I always wondered if the limited availability of the Nest enabled the company to keep complaints out of the public eye...

 

I just had mine fail.  The nest failed in such a way that my AUX heat was running all the time.  So, the system was cooling down the air then heating it back up.  Not so good for 95 degree weather.  The A/C system had been running for an average of 20 hrs each day for the last couple days.  I've only had it for 3 weeks...  After talking with the tech support, I could pickup that I wasn't the only one having similar issues. A new one has been overnighted, but it's the same revision.  So, when will it fail?

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post #152 of 226
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Originally Posted by sandor View Post

what features? 

 

there is honestly nothing that Nest provides that is actually useful or more efficient than a properly programmed thermostat with a web interface. they just throw it in a fancy package, create too-complicated electronics for it, and sell it to people too stupid to look for other options. I don't need a green leaf to tell me that i am saving energy when my HVAC system is off.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by diplication View Post


1). It learns
2). It adjusts according to the weather
3). It adjusts according to past performance
4). It senses when I'm home
5). I don't have to worry about programming it

 

6) It is aware of humidity and makes adjustments accordingly

7) It has a feature (unique as far as I know) where it extracts latent cool energy from the indoor coils by tuning off the compressor and running the fan for a few minutes.

 

I know I posted 7) earlier, but I don't think everyone saw it since people keep saying it doesn't have much to offer.  That one feature could make a significant difference in energy use.  Nest will keep adding such features as development continues.

post #153 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post


Here is an example: Let's say it is a hot day and the clever thermostat turns on the A/C. You decide to go outside and mow the yard for 30 minutes. Nest detects that you are gone so it shuts off the A/C. When you come back inside hot and sweaty, there is no A/C or does it somehow automatically know you will be back inside in 30 minutes and lets the A/C stay on?

The Nest isn't that aggressive in terms of the auto-away feature. Usually it's an average of two hours before it turns the house off. But it really depends on your observed habits. Nest published a white paper last year when the came to market based on their research of potential customer habits. They summized that there were two basic kinds of users...the ones who went to work and left the house for long periods of times, and the ones who work from home. One of the reasons Nest has motion sensors is to figure out what kind of user you are. If I left the house for work every morning, the Nest would realize this after a while and more aggressively terminate HVAC function earlier. In my case since I work from home, it's much less agressive.

For example, I travel on business from time to time. During those days, I notice that it usually takes my Nests about 3 1/2 hours to kick into auto-away once my wife and kids have left in the morning. But if I took a new job where I worked away from home all the time, it would notice this after a while and adjust accordingly. And of course, it pays attention to your habits evenings and weekends.

Finally, it's smart enough to understand that it's not supposed to shut off HVAC function during the middle of the night when you are sleeping, except if you've set it up for that. All of the bedrooms in my house (save the guest bedroom) are on the second floor handled by a specific HVAC/Nest combo. So during the summer there isn't a need to keep the ground floor as cool as the upstairs. I set the temperature for 80 degrees after 10 PM. The Nest understands that this is a temperature designed to save energy during the summer months and even acknowledges it on the display (reading "80 degrees for the night"). If the temperature were to rise above 80 degrees, the AC would activate even though no one has walked in front of the motion sensor in the middle of the night.
post #154 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by bottleworks View Post

I just had mine fail.  The nest failed in such a way that my AUX heat was running all the time.  So, the system was cooling down the air then heating it back up.  Not so good for 95 degree weather.  The A/C system had been running for an average of 20 hrs each day for the last couple days.  I've only had it for 3 weeks...  After talking with the tech support, I could pickup that I wasn't the only one having similar issues. A new one has been overnighted, but it's the same revision.  So, when will it fail?
Try disconnecting the heating and fan wires - leaving the common, and cooling wires. If the a/c stops functioning, it was wired wrong. If the aux heat still runs and the a/c still functions, it might be a problem with your system. If the aux heat stops but a/c still functions, then definitely the thermostat is faulty.

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post #155 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

If your house does not stay (somewhat) cool for 30 minutes, you have other issues.

Well it was just an example. I have no experience with the device so I simply asked a question. I my case, as stated earlier, my house is so well insulated and airtight I really don't need heat or A/C except on rare occasion, maybe a couple times a year for each at most and even then the temperature spread is so minimal I would consider my heating and cooling needs whim based as I really don't ever 'need' to used them. Just put on a sweat shirt or shorts as needed.

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post #156 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Well it was just an example. I have no experience with the device so I simply asked a question. I my case, as stated earlier, my house is so well insulated and airtight I really don't need heat or A/C except on rare occasion, maybe a couple times a year for each at most and even then the temperature spread is so minimal I would consider my heating and cooling needs whim based as I really don't ever 'need' to used them.

And in your case I would assume any knowledge person would discourage you from investing in a new thermostat, a Nest or any other brand.

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post #157 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sevenfeet View Post


The Nest isn't that aggressive in terms of the auto-away feature. Usually it's an average of two hours before it turns the house off. But it really depends on your observed habits. Nest published a white paper last year when the came to market based on their research of potential customer habits. They summized that there were two basic kinds of users...the ones who went to work and left the house for long periods of times, and the ones who work from home. One of the reasons Nest has motion sensors is to figure out what kind of user you are. If I left the house for work every morning, the Nest would realize this after a while and more aggressively terminate HVAC function earlier. In my case since I work from home, it's much less agressive.
For example, I travel on business from time to time. During those days, I notice that it usually takes my Nests about 3 1/2 hours to kick into auto-away once my wife and kids have left in the morning. But if I took a new job where I worked away from home all the time, it would notice this after a while and adjust accordingly. And of course, it pays attention to your habits evenings and weekends.
Finally, it's smart enough to understand that it's not supposed to shut off HVAC function during the middle of the night when you are sleeping, except if you've set it up for that. All of the bedrooms in my house (save the guest bedroom) are on the second floor handled by a specific HVAC/Nest combo. So during the summer there isn't a need to keep the ground floor as cool as the upstairs. I set the temperature for 80 degrees after 10 PM. The Nest understands that this is a temperature designed to save energy during the summer months and even acknowledges it on the display (reading "80 degrees for the night"). If the temperature were to rise above 80 degrees, the AC would activate even though no one has walked in front of the motion sensor in the middle of the night.

Thanks for the details. Still seems rather complicated, but for someone who wears flip flops a their primary footwear at home I really don't think I need one. I pity the fool who lives in ... [fill in your location]

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post #158 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Swamp cooler? You mean you have an airboat fan in your living room?
 

Actually the Colorado swamp cooler is the exact same technology used by many data centers including Apple's were by water is passed over coils as air is used to cause evaporative cooling.

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post #159 of 226
Large commercial coolers will use evaporative cooling to assist cooling the A/C coils but most smaller unit for houses don't use coils.
Water is dripped through a filter and air is pulled in through the filter thus moist air is pushed into the house.
Need to have air flow though the house so closing up everything tightly alá A/C will do no good.
Can't use them (non-coil coolers) in humid climates since it adds humidity and it would simply get more muggy inside.

I can drop the temp down to 60º with it (depending on temp/humidity outside).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evaporative_cooler

I read somewhere that Saudi was looking at hosting the Olympics and it was figured out they could lower the temp of the city by 25º by putting fountains all over the place (think the sprayers in lines at Disneyland).
Edited by Chris_CA - 6/24/12 at 9:02pm
post #160 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by diplication View Post


Try disconnecting the heating and fan wires - leaving the common, and cooling wires. If the a/c stops functioning, it was wired wrong. If the aux heat still runs and the a/c still functions, it might be a problem with your system. If the aux heat stops but a/c still functions, then definitely the thermostat is faulty.

 

No.  The Nest failed. 

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