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Apple tones down language touting OS X security measures - Page 2

post #41 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

OK, I can see this will be endless, so I'll leave with a summary of my opinion, cuz obviously it's just an opinion, of what's what

  • Apple has for years been subsidizing a sense of security by pointing at Windows faults
  • Apple has begun retracting that propaganda in light of recent, serious security breeches
  • OS X is not a stable environment relative to Windows 7
  • Apple has recently been in the habit of crashing their OS with patches
  • All systems have bugs, but the recent performance of OS updates exposes that OS X is *absolutely subject* to serious risks
  • If Apple's share of the market increases, those risks *will be* exploited
  • IMPORTANT: Use the rapidity of iOS's rooting as a forewarning of what the real-world will be like for a more popular OS X

Service advisory finished

 

That's great advice and, next year, if MAC OS X users get another 'virus' through a third party software developer, then we'll ensure they do a nice, easy restore from iCloud, then keep on trucking. Hell, if their iOS devices ever have the same happen, they'll probably do the same there as well.

 

If it happens.

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post #42 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

Apple has begun retracting that propaganda in light of recent, serious security breeches

To Java.
Quote:
OS X is not a stable environment relative to Windows 7

Hang on, let me go get a glass of milk so I can tell you I snorted it through my nose like ConradZitherGestan26 would.
Quote:
Apple has recently been in the habit of crashing their OS with patches

Someone go wake up the Webster's guys; a single instance of something happening is now defined as a "habit".
Quote:
If Apple's share of the market increases, those risks *will be* exploited

So the last twenty years haven't counted.
Quote:
IMPORTANT: Use the rapidity of iOS's rooting as a forewarning of what the real-world will be like for a more popular OS X

No, not in the slightest…

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post #43 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

 

That's great advice and, next year, if MAC OS X users get another 'virus' through a third party software developer, then we'll ensure they do a nice, easy restore from iCloud, then keep on trucking. Hell, if their iOS devices ever have the same happen, they'll probably do the same there as well.

 

If it happens.

 

Sigh, give the most recent Apple Insider article about Mountain Lion a read. Note the first paragraph, which I will relate below...

It was revealed on Monday that Apple's upcoming OS X Mountain Lion will feature an automatic security check feature that will ensure users have the most up-to-date software protection amid a growing number of Mac-targeted malware.

And the rest of the article further supports my guessing of what the future holds. You need to stop being so protective, and consider that OS X is finally starting to grow up. It means that you will have to grow up, too.
post #44 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

It was revealed on Monday that Apple's upcoming OS X Mountain Lion will feature an automatic security check feature that will ensure users have the most up-to-date software protection amid a growing number of Mac-targeted malware.

And your implication is what? This is to ensure all Mac users have updated security patches. This is absolutely no different from the five or fewer yearly security patches Apple already puts out, except users will be ensured to DO them from now on. This is Apple further removing the nonsense that users shouldn't have to see whatsoever, not an indication of any increased security problems.

No greater number of malware has come out for OS X, that is not a function of marketshare, and almost everything you've said has been wrong or based on the assumption that OS X operates at all like Windows.

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post #45 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


No, not in the slightest…

 

Java today, the rest tomorrow. The wave hits shore somewhere.

Do you snore, too? You're a doofus if you think OS X is more stable than Windows 7

Three times this year, wake up.

They do count - do you remember the 90's when Mac viruses were profligate? Back to a small market share, and, well, fewer viruses!

Right, it's not a "slight," it's a warning. You're a moderator, but you're also blind.
post #46 of 108
Now that kustardking has moved his trolling comments to include personal attacks can the mods consider a banning?

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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post #47 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

Java today, the rest tomorrow. The wave hits shore somewhere.

That's not how software works.
Quote:
Do you snore, too?

I sleep on my stomach.
Quote:
You're a doofus if you think OS X is more stable than Windows 7

Guess I'm a doofus. On that note, please do not insult AppleInsider users, as that's against our rules.
Quote:
Three times this year, wake up.

I can only recall the recent Thunderbolt patch. Would you mind listing the other two?
Quote:
They do count - do you remember the 90's when Mac viruses were profligate?

When they were… wasteful? No, I don't recall that… Probably because there were more problems with the classic OS' than there have been with OS X.
Quote:
Right, it's not a "slight," it's a warning.

I've no clue what you're talking about, nor do I believe do you.

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post #48 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

 

Java today, the rest tomorrow. The wave hits shore somewhere.
 

 

You're starting to sound an awful lot like Steve Ballmer:

 

"In the future this will definitely happen..."

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post #49 of 108

2004

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

 

Java today, the rest tomorrow. The wave hits shore somewhere.

 

 

2005

 

 


Quote:

Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

 

Java today, the rest tomorrow. The wave hits shore somewhere.

 

 

 

2006

 

 


Quote:

Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

 

Java today, the rest tomorrow. The wave hits shore somewhere.

 

 

 

2007

 

 


Quote:

Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

 

Java today, the rest tomorrow. The wave hits shore somewhere.

 

 

 

2008

 

 


Quote:

Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

 

Java today, the rest tomorrow. The wave hits shore somewhere.

 

 

 

2009

 

 


Quote:

Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

 

Java today, the rest tomorrow. The wave hits shore somewhere.

 

 

 

2010

 

 


Quote:

Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

 

Java today, the rest tomorrow. The wave hits shore somewhere.

 

 

 

2011

 

 


Quote:

Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

 

Java today, the rest tomorrow. The wave hits shore somewhere.

 

 

 

2012

 

 


Quote:

Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

 

Java today, the rest tomorrow. The wave hits shore somewhere.

 

 

 

Still waiting. We've been hearing the same lines for nearly a decade. Oh but NOW, it's different. Yes, THIS is The Year of Desktop Linux the year The Wave will hit.

 

But I'm not worried. because I know YOU will be the very first one to let us know when "the wave" hits. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Don't hold your breath.)

post #50 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


Guess I'm a doofus. On that note, please do not insult AppleInsider users, as that's against our rules.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Now that kustardking has moved his trolling comments to include personal attacks can the mods consider a banning?

Actually it is not against the rules. Insulting someone by calling them a doofus is not vulgar, obscene, threatening or against the law. 

 

Please read the terms of service for AI forum. It is only two paragraphs.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #51 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Actually it is not against the rules. Insulting someone by calling them a doofus is not vulgar, obscene, threatening or against the law. 

Please read the terms of service for AI forum. It is only two paragraphs.

I thought a personal attack on a person was a separate offense to those other offenses.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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post #52 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Still waiting. We've been hearing the same lines for nearly a decade. Oh but NOW, it's different. Yes, THIS is The Year of Desktop Linux the year The Wave will hit. But I'm not worried. because I know YOU will be the very first one to let us know when "the wave" hits. 

Gosh dang it, Huddler… so much useless WHITE SPACE. lol.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Actually it is not against the rules. Insulting someone by calling them a doofus is not vulgar, obscene, threatening or against the law. 

Need to write our rules out better, then. They're quite vague as-is.

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post #53 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

PR. They had to. 

 

The average user doesn't know the difference between "trojan" and "virus" and "malware." In fact, Joe Lunchbox lumps everything into the "virus" category. 

 

Next time a trojan shows up for OS X (we get one or two every few years, Lol) they'll scream "virus!!!"  and there goes the neighbourhood.

And whereas media coverage about the precious few pieces of OS X malware in the past was next to nonexistent, Apple's brand name has

garnered more attention over the past few years than ever. Count on the news about next trojan (maybe sometime next year)

to clog tech news sites and mainstream news outlets. 

 

Apple doesn't need to deal with that kind of bullish*t. Can't blame them for modifying the PR blurb.

It wasn't necessary, but the possibility for negative PR arising from consumer misunderstanding (or rather, ignorance) is far too great. 

I know how much you love Apple. Consider that they market on simplicity, and many tech illiterate individuals buy their product on this basis. Even if you look at Windows based systems, most malware in  the wild isn't in virus form, but the term has held up over the years. I am not suggesting they run out and get the latest security suite, but people should watch what they download and install regardless of operating system.

Quote:
Originally Posted by elmsley View Post

It's perfectly reasonably for Joe Lunchbox to think so.  Whether it's a worm or virus, or an STD, he doesn't care, "It just doesn't work, fix it" he yells.

 

Regardless, his understanding should be that "OS X doesn't need extra anti-viral software, because Apple will issue a security update ASAP if there is anything wrong".  It really doesn't make sense that they would need to teach us anything too technical. 

 

Should I be worried about my iOS running on 'unsecure wireless networks' yet?

 

That's what he gets for using an improperly shielded 64 pin connector.

post #54 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post

That's what he gets for using an improperly shielded 64 pin connector.

🏩… 💻 + ♨ = 💀

And according to some,

💣🔜📱

Emoji rock.

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post #55 of 108
If Apple had avoided making absurd claims of security invulnerability, they could have more reasonability shown independent analysis between PC and Mac virus/malware infections. to show where Mac stands against it's primary competitor. Instead, they ended up with egg on their face.

194
post #56 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


Gosh dang it, Huddler… so much useless WHITE SPACE. lol.gif
Need to write our rules out better, then. They're quite vague as-is.

 

I stepped away for a bit, but I'll respond generally:

- The "wave" never came before Apple never had a chance at market share like it has now. You don't see that? I'm sure you do, so note that you are splitting into two something that is one: low virus count == low market share.

- A higher malware count == greater share in the market, be happy Apple has to grow up and deal with it

- Your complacency is being abandoned by Apple, follow your leader

- I apologize for economizing my thoughts into the word doofus, but I didn't want to spend the rest of the evening going on about complacency in the face of a sea-change.

For your edification, OS patches causing full stop:
  • Recent Thunderbolt patch
  • CUI 10.7.3 boot failures and UI hangs, February 2012
  • Security 2011-006
post #57 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

Service advisory finished

 

You sure take a bit to wind down, don't you?

 

(>_<)

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post #58 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

 

You sure take a bit to wind down, don't you?

 

(>_<)

 

haha - right, sorry, but there were some replies.
post #59 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


🏩… 💻 + ♨ = 💀
And according to some,
💣🔜📱
Emoji rock.

Say what?

post #60 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

 

haha - right, sorry, but there were some replies.

 

Here's another.

 

I was a PC user, and professional supported it, for approximately thirteen years.

 

During that period of time, I reinstalled Windows both for myself, and many others, hundreds of time due to general Windows instabilities, viruses, etc...

 

Hundreds.

 

Since converting to MAC OS X about two years ago I have done a single install of an operating system

 

One.

 

From Snow Leopard to Lion.

 

During that time, my MBA has sometimes remained on for months at a time, going to sleep only when required, and it's been nice having a system that screams along without having to blow CPU cycles dragging bloated anti-virus software along with it.

 

My experience is not one of the minority.

 

Mind if we file your advice in the circular storage cabinet?

 

11971239281768335436doctormo_Put_Rubbish_in_Bin_Signs.svg.med.png

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post #61 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerrySwitched26 View Post

Say what?

 

He said someone set us up the bomb.

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post #62 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

 

Here's another.

 

I was a PC user, and professional supported it, for approximately thirteen years.

 

During that period of time, I reinstalled Windows both for myself, and many others, hundreds of time due to general Windows instabilities, viruses, etc...

 

Hundreds.

 

Since converting to MAC OS X about two years ago I have done a single install of an operating system

 

One.

 

From Snow Leopard to Lion.

 

During that time, my MBA has sometimes remained on for months at a time, going to sleep only when required, and it's been nice having a system that screams along without having to blow CPU cycles dragging bloated anti-virus software along with it.

 

My experience is not one of the minority.

 

Mind if we file your advice in the circular storage cabinet?

 

11971239281768335436doctormo_Put_Rubbish_in_Bin_Signs.svg.med.png

 

Not necessary, this is digital.

In my 20 years of using computers for work, I cursed Windows up through and including XP. I started using WIndows 7 about two years ago and have not had a fault since. I have had ONE blue screen, and that was when I knocked a card out of its slot. Also, no viruses, but perhaps that's because I'm careful.

Whereas OS X is far more coherent in visual presentation than Windows 7, is it far less stable and far less consistent in behavior. Don't take my word for it, look at the list of OS patch crashes I listed, and that's just what I remember off the top of my head. Maybe *you* didn't have those crashes, but LOTS of other people did. Apple has a very narrow band of hardware to support, it is ridiculous that those things happen. If you want to make excuses for Apple, then the balance of it is that in the two years I was using Windows 7, not one patch caused any trouble.

Anyway, perhaps we should all have a reunion when Apple's desktop share has doubled. I'll bookmark the thread.
post #63 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

Anyway, perhaps we should all have a reunion when Apple's desktop share has doubled. I'll bookmark the thread.

For reference you mean OS X, correct? So that'd be when Apple has 30% marketshare in the US and 12% worldwide, right?

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post #64 of 108
Here are the facts regarding Apple OS X security and privacy. Apple OS X 10.7 Lion is the most secure commercial operating system in widespread use.

Apple offers a Software Update control panel within the Mac App Store for automatic download and installation of Apple system software updates.

Apple provides a clear indication when installing software from third party sources on the Internet. Apple requires an administrator password when installing software unless the software is signed and installed from the Mac App Store although the Mac App Store requires the Apple iTunes username and password to purchase software.

Java Runtime (OpenJDK Project for Java on Mac OS X updates available from Oracle) and Adobe Flash (updates available from Adobe) are no longer bundled applications beginning with Mac OS X 10.7 Lion. The removal of Adobe Flash and Java Runtime remove a large number of potential exploits.

Application Sandboxing (Safari, for example, has now been divided into two processes that separate the browser's user interface and other functions from the part that parses JavaScript, images, and other web content) prevents applications from executing code in other applications.

Apple maintains a non-published list of possibly fraudulent websites which may optionally be used for warning users when visiting such websites. Apple Safari provides an option to block all website cookies, allow cookies only from visited websites or allow all cookies. Beginning with OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, Safari provides an option to deny website from accessing location services, prompting once each day or prompting once only. Apple Safari provides a "Do Not Track" option for compliant websites. Further privacy and security features and functions are provided via third party Safari extensions.

Apple Keychain allows users to save passwords and textual data encrypted in protected keychains. Apple Safari allows users to save usernames and passwords to visited websites.

For applications that a user may download from an unknown source Apple OS X 10.7 Lion offers file quarantine with malware detection to prevent code execution and determine if the file is a known threat.

In order to avoid the potential for users accidentally downloading and installing malicious software Apple introduced the Mac App Store in Mac OS X 10.7 Lion to provide a curated application (cursory review) purchasing experience with signed code. Apple extends the Mac App Store in OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion by introducing Gatekeeper which is an option to prevent installation of apps not from the Mac App Store and non-signed code.

In the unlikely event that an application is able to execute malicious code, Apple provides Address Space Layout Randomization (ASLR) including heap, stack, and dynamic linker which randomly arranges the positions of key data areas by obscuring memory addresses. Address Space Layout Randomization is valuable because attempting to inject code into an incorrect memory address will cause errors in the malicious code.

Apple OS X 10.7 Lion provides disk encryption for the entire disk (rather than only users' home folders) at the block level using XTS-AES 128 encryption. Encryption of external USB and FireWire drives is supported. Apple enables the administrator to designate a number of user accounts authorized to decrypt the system disk. A recovery key as well as Instant Wipe which removes the encryption key from your Mac instantaneously, making the data completely inaccessible are provided. Once the encryption key is erased, the Mac performs an entire wipe of the data from the disk.

If all else fails, Apple provides a Recovery Partition which was introduced in Mac OS X 10.7 Lion to allow users to easily restore their computer. Apple Time Machine provides an intuitive user interface for backup so users can restore corrupted data from a storage device. Apple Time Capsule integrates with Time Machine very well although third party solutions are also supported.

Apple provides a Secure Guest Account (an account that the system erases and resets at logout) for allowance of temporary use by authorized persons.

Apple OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion introduces Application level Privacy settings including Location Services to avoid unauthorized disclosure of personal information to legitimate applications which may not require invasive disclosure of personal information.

Apple provides extremely robust Parental Controls, allowing parents to; limit usage per day, limit which hours used per day, limit websites, limit applications and more.
Edited by MacBook Pro - 6/26/12 at 4:00am
post #65 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


For reference you mean OS X, correct? So that'd be when Apple has 30% marketshare in the US and 12% worldwide, right?

 

Sure, let's call it a date. Maybe tempers will have cooled and we can raise a beer to best-of-class.
post #66 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

Here are the facts regarding Apple OS X security and privacy. Apple OS X 10.7 Lion is the most secure commercial operating system is widespread use.
Apple offers a Software Update control panel within the Mac App Store for automatic download and installation of Apple system software updates.
Apple provides a clear indication when installing software from third party sources on the Internet. Apple requires an administrator password when installing software unless the software is signed and installed from the Mac App Store although the Mac App Store requires the Apple iTunes username and password to purchase software.
Java Runtime (OpenJDK Project for Java on Mac OS X updates available from Oracle) and Adobe Flash (updates available from Adobe) are no longer bundled applications beginning with Mac OS X 10.7 Lion. The removal of Adobe Flash and Java Runtime remove a large number of potential exploits.
Application Sandboxing (Safari, for example, has now been divided into two processes that separate the browser's user interface and other functions from the part that parses JavaScript, images, and other web content) prevents applications from executing code in other applications.
Apple maintains a non-published list of possibly fraudulent websites which may optionally be used for warning users when visiting such websites. Apple Safari provides an option to block all website cookies, allow cookies only from visited websites or allow all cookies. Beginning with OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, Safari provides an option to deny website from accessing location services, prompting once each day or prompting once only. Apple Safari provides a "Do Not Track" option for compliant websites. Further privacy and security features and functions are provided via third party Safari extensions.
Apple Keychain allows users to save passwords and textual data encrypted in protected keychains. Apple Safari allows users to save usernames and passwords to visited websites.
For applications that a user may download from an unknown source Apple OS X 10.7 Lion offers file quarantine with malware detection to prevent code execution and determine if the file is a known threat.
In order to avoid the potential for users accidentally downloading and installing malicious software Apple introduced the Mac App Store in Mac OS X 10.7 Lion to provide a curated application (cursory review) purchasing experience with signed code. Apple extends the Mac App Store in OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion by introducing Gatekeeper which is an option to prevent installation of apps not from the Mac App Store and non-signed code.
In the unlikely event that an application is able to execute malicious code, Apple provides Address Space Layout Randomization (ASLR) including heap, stack, and dynamic linker which randomly arranges the positions of key data areas by obscuring memory addresses. Address Space Layout Randomization is valuable because attempting to inject code into an incorrect memory address will cause errors in the malicious code.
Apple OS X 10.7 Lion provides disk encryption for the entire disk (rather than only users' home folders) at the block level using XTS-AES 128 encryption. Encryption of external USB and FireWire drives is supported. Apple enables the administrator to designate a number of user accounts authorized to decrypt the system disk. A recovery key as well as Instant Wipe which removes the encryption key from your Mac instantaneously, making the data completely inaccessible are provided. Once the encryption key is erased, the Mac performs an entire wipe of the data from the disk.
If all else fails, Apple provides a Recovery Partition which was introduced in Mac OS X 10.7 Lion to allow users to easily restore their computer. Apple Time Machine provides an intuitive user interface for backup so users can restore corrupted data from a storage device. Apple Time Capsule integrates with Time Machine very well although third party solutions are also supported.
Apple provides a Secure Guest Account (an account that the system erases and resets at logout) for allowance of temporary use by authorized persons.
Apple OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion introduces Application level Privacy settings including Location Services to avoid unauthorized disclosure of personal information to legitimate applications which may not require invasive disclosure of personal information.

 

Give this a read: http://eugene.kaspersky.com/2012/05/31/when-will-apple-get-security-religion/
post #67 of 108
Here is the list of Windows 7 updates this year through early May 2012:

01/10/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2584146)
01/10/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2585542)
01/10/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2631813)
01/10/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2644615)
01/10/2012 Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2632503)
01/17/2012 Windows Internet Explorer 9 for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB982861)
02/14/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2645640)
02/14/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2654428)
02/14/2012 Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2600217)
02/14/2012 Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2640148)
02/14/2012 Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2660075)
03/13/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2621440)
03/13/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2667402)
04/10/2012 Cumulative Security Update for Internet Explorer 8 for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2675157)
04/10/2012 Cumulative Security Update for Internet Explorer 9 for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2675157)
04/10/2012 Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5.1 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2656373)
04/10/2012 Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2656368)
04/10/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2653956)
04/10/2012 Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2679255)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5.1 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2604115)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5.1 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2656411)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2604121)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2656351)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2656405)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft Silverlight (KB2636927)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2658846)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2659262)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2660649)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2676562)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2688338)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2690533)
05/08/2012 Update Rollup for ActiveX Killbits for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2695962)
05/08/2012 Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool x64 - May 2012 (KB890830)
02/14/2012 Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB2597091) 32-Bit Edition
04/10/2012 Security Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB2598039) 32-Bit Edition
04/10/2012 Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB2202188) 32-Bit Edition
04/10/2012 Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB2553267) 32-Bit Edition
04/10/2012 Update for Microsoft Outlook 2010 (KB2553248) 32-Bit Edition
04/10/2012 Update for Microsoft Outlook Social Connector 2010 (KB2553406) 32-Bit Edition
05/08/2012 Definition Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB982726) 32-Bit Edition
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft Excel 2010 (KB2597166) 32-Bit Edition
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB2553371) 32-Bit Edition
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft Visio Viewer 2010 (KB2597981) 32-Bit Edition
05/08/2012 Update for Microsoft OneNote 2010 (KB2589345) 32-Bit Edition


Seems secure to me. Oh, wait ...
Edited by MacBook Pro - 6/25/12 at 8:49pm
post #68 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

Here is the list of Windows 7 updates this year through early May 2012:
01/10/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2584146)
01/10/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2585542)
01/10/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2631813)
01/10/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2644615)
01/10/2012 Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2632503)
01/17/2012 Windows Internet Explorer 9 for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB982861)
02/14/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2645640)
02/14/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2654428)
02/14/2012 Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2600217)
02/14/2012 Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2640148)
02/14/2012 Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2660075)
03/13/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2621440)
03/13/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2667402)
04/10/2012 Cumulative Security Update for Internet Explorer 8 for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2675157)
04/10/2012 Cumulative Security Update for Internet Explorer 9 for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2675157)
04/10/2012 Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5.1 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2656373)
04/10/2012 Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2656368)
04/10/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2653956)
04/10/2012 Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2679255)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5.1 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2604115)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5.1 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2656411)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2604121)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2656351)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2656405)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft Silverlight (KB2636927)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2658846)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2659262)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2660649)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2676562)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2688338)
05/08/2012 Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2690533)
05/08/2012 Update Rollup for ActiveX Killbits for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB2695962)
05/08/2012 Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool x64 - May 2012 (KB890830)
02/14/2012 Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB2597091) 32-Bit Edition
04/10/2012 Security Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB2598039) 32-Bit Edition
04/10/2012 Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB2202188) 32-Bit Edition
04/10/2012 Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB2553267) 32-Bit Edition
04/10/2012 Update for Microsoft Outlook 2010 (KB2553248) 32-Bit Edition
04/10/2012 Update for Microsoft Outlook Social Connector 2010 (KB2553406) 32-Bit Edition
05/08/2012 Definition Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB982726) 32-Bit Edition
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft Excel 2010 (KB2597166) 32-Bit Edition
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB2553371) 32-Bit Edition
05/08/2012 Security Update for Microsoft Visio Viewer 2010 (KB2597981) 32-Bit Edition
05/08/2012 Update for Microsoft OneNote 2010 (KB2589345) 32-Bit Edition

 

Excellent - they're on the ball! Honestly, Apple will need to be this proactive.
post #69 of 108
For further contemplation:

“It's a significant improvement, and the best way that I've described the level of security in Lion is that it's Windows 7, plus, plus,” said Dino Dai Zovi, principal of security consultancy Trail of Bits and the coauthor of The Mac Hacker's Handbook. “I generally tell Mac users that if they care about security, they should upgrade to Lion sooner rather than later, and the same goes for Windows users, too.”

“When they went from Leopard to Snow Leopard, as far as I'm concerned, there really wasn't any change,” said Charlie Miller, principal research consultant at security firm Accuvant and the other coauthor of The Mac Hacker's Handbook. “They might have said there was more security and it was better, but at a low functionality level there really wasn't any difference. Now, they've made significant changes and it's going to be harder to exploit.”

“Now, you end up inside this restricted process that only does the web parsing, and you can't do other things you might want to do as an attacker, such as write files or read a person's documents,” Miller explained. “Even when you get code execution, you no longer have free rein to do whatever you want. You can do only what the sandbox allows you to do.”

Dan Goodin. Published 21 July 2011. Major overhaul makes OS X Lion king of security Windows 7, Ubuntu meet their match. The Register. Retrieved 25 June, 2012.


I would like to say congratulations Zero Day Initiative's Pwn2Own 2012 winners; VUPEN for placing first by demonstrating two 0 day vulnerabilities; one for Internet Explorer and one for Chrome. as well as Vincenzo Iozzo and Willem Pinckaers for demonstrating a Firefox 0 day.
post #70 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

For further contemplation:
“It's a significant improvement, and the best way that I've described the level of security in Lion is that it's Windows 7, plus, plus,” said Dino Dai Zovi, principal of security consultancy Trail of Bits and the coauthor of The Mac Hacker's Handbook. “I generally tell Mac users that if they care about security, they should upgrade to Lion sooner rather than later, and the same goes for Windows users, too.”
“When they went from Leopard to Snow Leopard, as far as I'm concerned, there really wasn't any change,” said Charlie Miller, principal research consultant at security firm Accuvant and the other coauthor of The Mac Hacker's Handbook. “They might have said there was more security and it was better, but at a low functionality level there really wasn't any difference. Now, they've made significant changes and it's going to be harder to exploit.”
“Now, you end up inside this restricted process that only does the web parsing, and you can't do other things you might want to do as an attacker, such as write files or read a person's documents,” Miller explained. “Even when you get code execution, you no longer have free rein to do whatever you want. You can do only what the sandbox allows you to do.”
Dan Goodin. Published 21 July 2011. Major overhaul makes OS X Lion king of security Windows 7, Ubuntu meet their match. The Register. Retrieved 25 June, 2012.
I would like to say congratulations Zero Day Initiative's Pwn2Own 2012 winners; VUPEN for placing first by demonstrating two 0 day vulnerabilities; one for Internet Explorer and one for Chrome. as well as Vincenzo Iozzo and Willem Pinckaers for demonstrating a Firefox 0 day.

 

OK, that's a year older than my link, and of course predates all the excitement of late, but yes, food for thought.

So, unless something else silly comes up, adieu until Apple doubles its share!
post #71 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

Excellent - they're on the ball! Honestly, Apple will need to be this proactive.

Ever noticed that Apple gets along better than Windows with fewer updates?

Ever stop and think there might be a reason for that?

I'll give you a hint: it rhymes with Munich's Barkitecture.

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
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Originally Posted by asdasd

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post #72 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


For reference you mean OS X, correct? So that'd be when Apple has 30% marketshare in the US and 12% worldwide, right?

 

Actually, in the post-pc world (us being the the pre-post-pc world currently) you'd probably have to include iPhones and iPads as well, and with the tablet market actually just being an iPad market it could be quite interesting to see what happens with those percentages.

 

Should we also include most of Samsung's hardware and all Android devices as well, seeing as they originated with Apple? How about the 'Inspired by Apple Intel' ultrabook market?

 

Nah, let's give them a fighting chance.

 

Samsung Hardware: The only virus Apple needs to keep an eye out for.

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post #73 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kustardking View Post


Anyway, perhaps we should all have a reunion when Apple's desktop share has doubled. I'll bookmark the thread.

Bookmark away. Bottom line is Windows is losing advocates and Mac is gaining them. Whether those advocates are of the IT professional domain or not is debatable but Windows is in decline and Mac is on the increase. Spin it however you like but Windows has become too expensive and UNIX is the new vanilla generic default. Mac fits right into that new paradigm. Windows is a pain in th ass but I'm only dealing with server 2008 so perhaps they will solve all the useability issues with the next version however after using Windows server since 3.51 somehow I doubt it.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #74 of 108
Since there are no intelligent responses countering my comments, I assume those who were defending the garbage that is Microsoft Windows have finished.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

Actually, in the post-pc world (us being the the pre-post-pc world currently) you'd probably have to include iPhones and iPads as well, and with the tablet market actually just being an iPad market it could be quite interesting to see what happens with those percentages.

Should we also include most of Samsung's hardware and all Android devices as well, seeing as they originated with Apple? How about the 'Inspired by Apple Intel' ultrabook market?

Nah, let's give them a fighting chance.

Samsung Hardware: The only virus Apple needs to keep an eye out for.


Actually, considering iOS and OS X have a common core we should include discussions of iOS security. Since one of the arguments from ignorance regards market share, we should discuss the applicable market share which is both iOS and OS X.
Edited by MacBook Pro - 6/25/12 at 9:11pm
post #75 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

Excellent - they're on the ball! Honestly, Apple will need to be this proactive.

So Apple issues a security update, which they've done for as many years as I can recall, they are off the ball, but when MS issues a security update it means they are on the ball. Got it! Conclusion: no one should continue responding to you because you refuse to even try to be objective or rational.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

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post #76 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

So Apple issues a security update, which they've done for as many years as I can recall, they are off the ball, but when MS issues a security update it means they are on the ball. Got it! Conclusion: no one should continue responding to you because you refuse to even try to be objective or rational.

Aside from said person not reading my posts which clearly indicate that (although Apple has rarely needed the ability to push security updates daily) they have the capability to push security updates daily. As most of us know, there is a vast difference between having the ability to push security updates every day and needing to push security updates every day.
post #77 of 108
Apple Insider needs to do something about the recent rash of troublemakers or they will start losing their audience. Probably good business to remove some of the abusers as, given their attitude despite what they might say, they almost certainly don't buy Apple products (from Apple Insider).
post #78 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

Since there are no intelligent responses countering my comments, I assume those who were defending the garbage that is Microsoft Windows have finished.
Actually, considering iOS and OS X have a common core we should include discussions of iOS security. Since one of the arguments from ignorance regards market share, we should discuss the applicable market share which is both iOS and OS X.

 

Ho hum - I'll be back in a year, maybe you'll have woken up by then. Once you do, read the link I posted, it'll still be more current than what you presented.

And yes, perhaps troublemakers such as yourself should re-read their posts! SO angry!
post #79 of 108
Another unintelligent response which explains why people purchase Microsoft Windows.

Oh, well ... "Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that" - George Carlin
post #80 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kustardking View Post

 

Ho hum - I'll be back in a year, maybe you'll have woken up by then. Once you do, read the link I posted, it'll still be more current than what you presented.

And yes, perhaps troublemakers such as yourself should re-read their posts! SO angry!

 

And he's gone.

 

(Maybe)

 

MythBusted.gif

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