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Apple could see U.S. import ban following ITC review of Motorola patent win - Page 2

post #41 of 64

Silly little guy.  It's because Apple started this whole patent trolling initiative once competition caught up.   If anyone is to blame for the state of rampart patent litigation cases and idiotic patent fillings it's Apple.   You could throw SCO and Oracle into the mix, but currently Apple is the king of patent trolling in the tech industry.   

 

I don't blame any other company one bit for sticking it back to Apple.  The day they decided to troll instead of innovate was the day they lost my respect.   I figured with Jobs' ego out of the way, Apple could get back to innovation, but that's clearly not the case with Timmy on board who has yet to reign in the vampirous lawyers.

post #42 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by ingua2 View Post

Silly little guy.  It's because Apple started this whole patent trolling initiative once competition caught up.   If anyone is to blame for the state of rampart patent litigation cases and idiotic patent fillings it's Apple.   You could throw SCO and Oracle into the mix, but currently Apple is the king of patent trolling in the tech industry.   

I don't blame any other company one bit for sticking it back to Apple.  The day they decided to troll instead of innovate was the day they lost my respect.   I figured with Jobs' ego out of the way, Apple could get back to innovation, but that's clearly not the case with Timmy on board who has yet to reign in the vampirous lawyers.

Apple trolls instead of innovates? Then why are the entire PC and smart phone markets going out of their way to slavishly copy everything Apple does?
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
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post #43 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Apple trolls instead of innovates? Then why are the entire PC and smart phone markets going out of their way to slavishly copy everything Apple does?

 

Is there a reason you're responding to 1 post trolls?

post #44 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post

Is there a reason you're responding to 1 post trolls?

Baby trolls need nourishment. Lol
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
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post #45 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post

Is there a reason you're responding to 1 post trolls?

Allowing their content to stand unchallenged seems to outside readers to be acceptance of what they say. I wouldn't want that myself, and it's evident others don't, either.

It'd be the same as a single post account coming here and gushing about some faulty product from an untrustworthy company. Someone sees that uncontested, buys the product, gets burned, and never comes back to the site.

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Originally Posted by Marvin

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post #46 of 64
Quote:

  • If the record of an investigation lacks evidence sufficient to support a RAND-based
    affirmative defense (e.g., equitable estoppel, implied license, waiver, etc.), under what
    circumstances (if any) should a RAND obligation nonetheless preclude issuance of an
    exclusion order?

  • Does the mere existence of a RAND obligation preclude issuance of an exclusion
    order?

  • Should a patent owner that has refused to offer a license to a named respondent in a
    Commission investigation on a RAND obligated patent be able to obtain an exclusion
    order?

  • Should a patent owner that has refused to offer a license on a RAND obligated patent
    to some entity (regardless of whether that entity is a named respondent in a
    Commission investigation) be able to obtain an exclusion order?

  • Should a patent owner that has refused to negotiate a license on RAND terms with a
    named respondent in a Commission investigation be precluded from obtaining an
    exclusion order?

These are interesting questions that should be discussed carefully.  But I would say that, in general, a RAND-encumbered patent owner should not be able to seek exclusion orders until they've already exhausted all reasonable avenues of bargaining in good faith for a RAND license agreement.

 

Quote:

  • Should a patent owner who has offered a RAND license that the named respondent in
    a Commission investigation has rejected be precluded from obtaining an exclusion
    order?

In this case, yes, an exclusion order should be an available recourse for the owner of a RAND-encumbered patent whose good faith offer was truly made in compliance with RAND terms but that offer was rejected.

 

But does the evidence show that this course of events actually happened in this particular case?

Did Motorola actually make an offer to Apple that fit the definition of RAND?  Did Apple actually refuse to accept such an offer?

post #47 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by ingua2 View Post

Silly little guy.  It's because Apple started this whole patent trolling initiative once competition caught up.   If anyone is to blame for the state of rampart patent litigation cases and idiotic patent fillings it's Apple.   You could throw SCO and Oracle into the mix, but currently Apple is the king of patent trolling in the tech industry.   

 

I don't blame any other company one bit for sticking it back to Apple.  The day they decided to troll instead of innovate was the day they lost my respect.   I figured with Jobs' ego out of the way, Apple could get back to innovation, but that's clearly not the case with Timmy on board who has yet to reign in the vampirous lawyers.

 

 

Apple doesn't actually fit the definition of "patent troll." 

 

As for innovation, what more do you want from Apple? iPhone, iPad, App Store, Retina Macs (never mind that, how about Retina in general), etc., just to name a few. Apple's been doing nothing but turning entire industries inside-out for the past 5 years, if not more. It wasn't Samsung or HTC or Microsoft on stage at those keynotes in June 2007 and January 2010. There's only so much "new" Apple or anyone can do every year. If you have cause to complain about innovation when it comes to Apple, I shudder to think how much lower your opinion would be of the also-rans: Microsoft (especially Microsoft), Acer, Lenovo, Dell, and the Android OEMs . . . everyone who is holding the industry back and/or constantly looking to Apple to light the way forward. 

 

Apple spoils us, no question about it. Everyone else is perpetually asleep at the wheel, doing little more than hardware spec bumps off Apple's original efforts while half-assing even the basics of the software that's supposed to run on them. 

 

As for litigation, this is nothing new. Apple has always been extremely litigious. It's neither costly, nor do consumers really care about it. 

 
Apple has a LONG history of this sort of litigation, FROM DAY 1. The purpose of which is just another way to help them differentiate themselves from everyone else. Apple's litigious behaviour is part and parcel of their policy to litigate rather than license. It has always been this way, ever since the early days of Apple. And if you're an enthusiastic Apple-user (and a relieved non-MS user) then you can thank you're lucky stars that Apple behaved this way. 
 
This is a part of Apple's history. There is much, much more to Apple's litigation strategy than mere dollars and cents and the assumption that they're just interested in acting like jerks or "bullies."
post #48 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

So one judge (Posner) says that banning a Motorola device would be "catastrophic and hurtful" to users in denying and dismissing both company's lawsuits. Now the ITC might possibly ban Apple products and that would not be catastrophic and hurtful to users? Is that about it?

Ikrupp,

 

It's call the Goose and Gander

 

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2405411,00.asp

post #49 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

 

 

Apple doesn't actually fit the definition of "patent troll." 

 

 Retina Macs (never mind that, how about Retina in general)

 

 

Actually, Samsung had a phone with a retina class display a full year before the iP4, in the Jet S8000.  So Apple did not invent 'retina' or innovate it's introduction.  I certainly give Apple credit for marketing the idea and making a big deal out of it.  Samsung certainly missed the opportunity there.

 

IBM were way ahead of Apple with the idea and introduced high ppi monitors for image critical applications in 2001.

post #50 of 64

Apparently someone should have told Apple that they shouldn't be holding onto the bomb when going 'thermonuclear'....
 

post #51 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post

 

Actually, Samsung had a phone with a retina class display a full year before the iP4, in the Jet S8000.  So Apple did not invent 'retina' or innovate it's introduction.  I certainly give Apple credit for marketing the idea and making a big deal out of it.  Samsung certainly missed the opportunity there.

 

IBM were way ahead of Apple with the idea and introduced high ppi monitors for image critical applications in 2001.

 

They did and, apart from having a high resolution display, it was your typically plasticky, rubbish bit of phone from Samsung.

 

Techradar had the following to say about:

 

"Poor internet browser"

"TouchWiz interface lets down"

"slightly cheap feel"

"laggy interface at times"

"it feels a little lightweight and, dare we say it, cheap in the hand."

"Samsung is still stuck in Division 2 when it comes to the touchscreen game"

"when you receive a text message or missed call on the home screen, it's nigh on impossible to press the 'view' button without missing a couple of times"

"when trying to scroll through names in the contacts menu, even though Samsung has provided a handle to drag through the different letters, we couldn't accurately hold this even after extended use, and was a real irritation"

"there are other points where the processor seems to have up and left, leaving its wheezing understudy from an old Samsung D600 to take over"

 

I could go on, but you get the picture.

 

The mere fact that the average person hasn't even heard of this phone tells you all you need to know about it.

Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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post #52 of 64

1) This lawsuit was filed before Google gained ownership.

2) Apple is the big bully when it comes to patent lawsuits, not Motorola

 

Apple has plenty of money in the bank.  The judge surely knows this.  He also, likely knows, Apple is prepared to waste a lot of it in lawsuits.  (Steve talked about this in his book.)

Judges don't like companies wasting their time with boring (patent) lawsuits just because they can.  Wake up!!  Apple is the one to hate on, not Motorola.

 

Motorola is having issues making money.  Why bother them?  If iProducts are so much better, what is Apple so worried about?

 

Scott

post #53 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

 

They did and, apart from having a high resolution display, it was your typically plasticky, rubbish bit of phone from Samsung.

 

Techradar had the following to say about:

 

"Poor internet browser"

"TouchWiz interface lets down"

"slightly cheap feel"

"laggy interface at times"

"it feels a little lightweight and, dare we say it, cheap in the hand."

"Samsung is still stuck in Division 2 when it comes to the touchscreen game"

"when you receive a text message or missed call on the home screen, it's nigh on impossible to press the 'view' button without missing a couple of times"

"when trying to scroll through names in the contacts menu, even though Samsung has provided a handle to drag through the different letters, we couldn't accurately hold this even after extended use, and was a real irritation"

"there are other points where the processor seems to have up and left, leaving its wheezing understudy from an old Samsung D600 to take over"

 

I could go on, but you get the picture.

 

The mere fact that the average person hasn't even heard of this phone tells you all you need to know about it.

 

...and what does any of this have to do with the fact that Apple did NOT invent the idea of increasing pixel density for better viewing quality???

post #54 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by e_veritas View Post

 

...and what does any of this have to do with the fact that Apple did NOT invent the idea of increasing pixel density for better viewing quality???

 

Did Apple claim to invent the idea of increasing pixel density for better viewing quality?

Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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post #55 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Palmer View Post

1) This lawsuit was filed before Google gained ownership.

2) Apple is the big bully when it comes to patent lawsuits, not Motorola

 

Apple has plenty of money in the bank.  The judge surely knows this.  He also, likely knows, Apple is prepared to waste a lot of it in lawsuits.  (Steve talked about this in his book.)

Judges don't like companies wasting their time with boring (patent) lawsuits just because they can.  Wake up!!  Apple is the one to hate on, not Motorola.

 

Motorola is having issues making money.  Why bother them?  If iProducts are so much better, what is Apple so worried about?

 

Scott

 

1. Defending your intellectual property is not bullying, and any company is well within their rights to do it.

 

2. Funds in the bank are only an advantage when defending yourself against legal action, as recognition of 'vexatious litigation' by legal systems around the world actually prevents what you claim is occurring.

 

"Motorola is having issues making money Why bother them?"

 

What kind of a statement is this?

 

If somebody breaks into your house and steals your HDTV because he only has an old CRT one, do you just forget about it?



(By the way, Scott, you don't need to sign your name at the end of your post. It's right there in your username on the left.)

Sincerest,
GTR
Edited by GTR - 6/26/12 at 7:54pm
Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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post #56 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by ingua2 View Post

Silly little guy.  It's because Apple started this whole patent trolling initiative once competition caught up.   If anyone is to blame for the state of rampart patent litigation cases and idiotic patent fillings it's Apple.   You could throw SCO and Oracle into the mix, but currently Apple is the king of patent trolling in the tech industry.   

I don't blame any other company one bit for sticking it back to Apple.  The day they decided to troll instead of innovate was the day they lost my respect.   I figured with Jobs' ego out of the way, Apple could get back to innovation, but that's clearly not the case with Timmy on board who has yet to reign in the vampirous lawyers.

No, no. Don't you know the rules of trolling on these forums? OK, quick tutorial, since you're new...

You're NEVER supposed to claim that Apple innovates, not even in the past tense. You must accuse Apple of copying others. Always dig up picturez of Samsung's digital photo frame or LG Prada or if you're a pro, you can post picturez of cornerz.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #57 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

No, no. Don't you know the rules of trolling on these forums? OK, quick tutorial, since you're new...
You're NEVER supposed to claim that Apple innovates, not even in the past tense. You must accuse Apple of copying others. Always dig up picturez of Samsung's digital photo frame or LG Prada or if you're a pro, you can post picturez of cornerz.

Frickin' noob trolls.

Getting real sick of edumacating them, aren't you? ;-)
Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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post #58 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Allowing their content to stand unchallenged seems to outside readers to be acceptance of what they say. I wouldn't want that myself, and it's evident others don't, either.
It'd be the same as a single post account coming here and gushing about some faulty product from an untrustworthy company. Someone sees that uncontested, buys the product, gets burned, and never comes back to the site.

If it was an attention-starved troll like ZZZ, I'd ignore them, but 1 post trolls seem like they registered to post, possibly never to be seen again.

I really look for the posts that sound like they were professionally written by "social media experts" who are paid by companies to go online (e.g. register on forums like these or otherwise use social media) to post insincere stories about how they used to be Apple fans until Samsung came out with and then they sold their iPhone yada yada. The stories always follow that same formula. It sounds fabricated. Remember the video of the "WAKE UP" flash mob that some dude supposedly happened to film because he bought some new microphone for his iPhone and therefore just happened to be near the Apple Store to film the whole thing and post it on YouTube? That's the level of insincereity and social media manipulation I'm talking about. Paid shills are out there, and I believe they have posted on these forums before, and I usually call it out if I think a post fits that. They tend to be recently registered accounts with just 1 or 2 posts. And then you never heard from them again.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #59 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

 

Did Apple claim to invent the idea of increasing pixel density for better viewing quality?


Not, but some funny people around here claim Apple invented Retina display (and Retina in general - funny, that, I was pretty confident Retina came from mother Nature, or some deity).

 

Which is what previous poster was replying to.

 

For someone who is Apple user but not an Apple fan, it is really amusing to read what some people around here are trying to sell as Apple's inventions. Masterful implementation of already available technologies, yes. But inventions... lol.gif

post #60 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post


Not, but some funny people around here claim Apple invented Retina display (and Retina in general - funny, that, I was pretty confident Retina came from mother Nature, or some deity).

 

Which is what previous poster was replying to.

 

For someone who is Apple user but not an Apple fan, it is really amusing to read what some people around here are trying to sell as Apple's inventions. Masterful implementation of already available technologies, yes. But inventions... lol.gif

 

Nice of you to reply when he was unable to.

 

Unfortunately, you are incorrect about your assumption that 'Retina Display' came from Mother Nature or some Deity, both of which present things in a much higher resolution.

 

Retina Display is a term that describes the technological achievement of making the individual pixels unable to be discerned when viewed from a certain distance, depending on the device.

 

It'd be appreciated if you checked your facts and not present either your own, or others, opinions when attempting to provide 'proof', and let's try to have a little respect for a company that rarely claims to have invented anything, but has re-invented a hell of a lot of stuff that many of us use on a daily basis.

 

Ironically, I'm not an Apple fan either, but I do like to pay credit where credit is due.


Edited by GTR - 6/26/12 at 11:22pm
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post #61 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

 

Nice of you to reply when he was unable to.

 

Ironically, I'm not an Apple fan either, but I do like to pay credit where credit is due.

 

Originally Posted by GTR View Post

 

They did and, apart from having a high resolution display, it was your typically plasticky, rubbish bit of phone from Samsung.

 

Techradar had the following to say about:

 

"Poor internet browser"

"TouchWiz interface lets down"

"slightly cheap feel"

"laggy interface at times"

"it feels a little lightweight and, dare we say it, cheap in the hand."

"Samsung is still stuck in Division 2 when it comes to the touchscreen game"

"when you receive a text message or missed call on the home screen, it's nigh on impossible to press the 'view' button without missing a couple of times"

"when trying to scroll through names in the contacts menu, even though Samsung has provided a handle to drag through the different letters, we couldn't accurately hold this even after extended use, and was a real irritation"

"there are other points where the processor seems to have up and left, leaving its wheezing understudy from an old Samsung D600 to take over"

 

I could go on, but you get the picture.

 

The mere fact that the average person hasn't even heard of this phone tells you all you need to know about it.

 

 

If you had looked at the posters location and factored in the time zones, you might have worked out why I hadn't replied, but it seems your gloating ego overrode the higher functioning parts of your brain in it's chortling impatience to declare some sort of a win.

 

I am also an Apple user, but not a 'fan'.  I gave Apple the credit they are due for their marketing regarding pushing Retina.  My reply was aimed at someone who was insinuating Apple were responsible for high dpi displays in devices.  Nothing in your post negated or was relevant to what I said, you just took an irrelevant tangent trying to discredit the phone I mentioned, as if that in some way negated the validity of my comments.

 

However, I'll bite on the phone, just for fun, even though that is not germane to the issue I was addressing.

 

I actually bought a Jet so asking me if I 'get the picture' is a bit ironic, because pictures were one of the main reasons I bought it.  It was a feature phone, not a smart phone and was priced accordingly.  It was quite a way from being Samsung's flagship model.  I actually liked that it was very lightweight.  That belied the fact it was well built and is physically tough (as 2 years in the hands of a teen have proved).  I would bet it would better survive drops onto a hard surface better than the same milieu iPhone 3gs.

 

Very classy of you to selectively quote from the techradar review.  Some bits you missed:

 

 

Quote:

it still packs some mean hardware under the hood.

And we're not just being complimentary of the specs by saying that, we're talking an industry-leading 800MHz processor powering the performance from a dinky frame (108.9 x 53.5 x 11.9mm) on a 3.1-inch AMOLED screen.

 

While it's hard to see where this might rival the iPhone in the mobile phone market, bar having a touchscreen, it's certainly cheaper than most of its smartphone rivals, with users getting a free phone and paying less on their contract and up to £150 less to pick up the handset SIM free.

The first thing that hits you when you pick up the Samsung Jet S8000 is just how small it is. While the dimensions will give you an idea just how dinky it is, it's very hard to describe just how diminutive this feels in the hand.

This is a double-edged sword for the phone: on the one hand, the Samsung Jet S8000 fits very well in the pocket and is a real pleasure to carry around compared to some of the other chunka-phones on offer.

However, on the other hand, the plastic chassis and the 110g weight count against it, as it feels a little lightweight and, dare we say it, cheap in the hand.

 

Put's that 'cheap feel' into better perspective when you include the full quote.

 

Quote:
Samsung's reason for including its proprietary TouchWiz interface is apparently due to trying to keep costs down and make it affordable for consumers in these credit-crunched times.
...
Calling on the Samsung Jet S8000 was a pretty decent experience, with call coverage better than average in most cases. The pleasing thing was this was mostly 3.5G HSDPA coverage too, meaning that where we could chat, we could also surf should we be so inclined.
...

The camera on the Samsung Jet S8000 is a 5MP effort, but with the added beauty of a dual LED. What this means is while colours don't look any more vibrant (the method of producing white LEDs means they are very poor at reproducing a full colour gamut compared to the likes of Xenon) the lighting isn't so harsh, and the shadows are reduced somewhat, which is a good thing obviously.

The sheer variety of scene modes we've been treated to on previous high-end Samsung models are here once again on the Jet S8000, with the likes of night mode, sports, sunset and dawn all giving you a wide variety of options. Of course there's no digital zoom, but you can always put together some lovely panorama shots instead to make yourself feel better, and of course 2GB of internal storage means no more worrying about filling up another memory card.

...

 

The video recording on the Jet S8000, a VGA 30 fps offering (with a 120fps slo-mo mode too) is pretty darned decent, and probably a shade better than the iPhone 3GS (which people have been going a little crazy for if you haven't noticed), with manual or auto exposure adjustment keeping things nice and crisp.

...

The OLED screen is currently the piece of hardware on a phone that brings the 'Wow factor' and Samsung is rightfully pushing it for all it's worth, with the Jet S8000 being the third or fourth from the Koreans to make use of the technology.

Not only that, but we're also treated to a headphone jack, so media on the go will be a lot less wire-filled than before, and we won't have to fork out time and again for a new adaptor when we break them.

....

Watching a video on the Samsung Jet S8000 was predictably a lovely experience, with the AMOLED screen oozing colour and dripping with high-contrast ratios. The 3.1-inch screen is far too small to watch a full length movie on, but juice up the memory with a few music videos and you've got a perfect fit.

...

We managed to flick through a number of different standards of video easily on the Samsung Jet S8000, with a huge number of codecs pleasingly supported.

...

FM Radio

We liked this application a lot, mostly because it was easy to set up, had very good reception for a phone, and you could not only identify tracks but also record them too.

The Find Music function simply asked you to record a section of the track, which is then sent to the server. Once completed, it then sends you the name of the song, the artist, album art and a link to download it from the Samsung music store.

 

We had to applaud such tight integration from Samsung on the method of bringing users from the radio to the store - not even Apple can boast such integration on the iPhone 3GS.

But what lost us right at the end was the exorbitant price of purchasing said music, with each track costing £3 as far as our tests could show.

...

Video editing is fairly comprehensive (much more so than the iPhone 3GS, and we know how giddy the world went for that when learning you can TRIM A VIDEO) with the ability to splice, cut, copy and more, as well as adding audio tracks, although MP3s weren't compatible for some reason.

...

One of the big plus points of an OLED screen is the fact it uses a lot less power than its LCD counterparts, which means a longer lasting battery - and the Samsung Jet S8000 certainly makes use of it.

We managed to get around one and a half days' usage out of it when leaning on the phone fairly heavily (one manufacturer once called us a power user... we didn't like that label as we have neither a Filofax nor do we 'do lunch' with 'Samson from Accounts') and even managed to coax two days' worth of use out of it when we realised late on that we'd forgotten our charger.

...

The new PC Studio 3.1 software has allowed Samsung to re-think the way people use their phone with a PC, and this looks and works fabulously. It essentially turns your phone into a PDA portal, and while the functions might not look or work as well on the handset, they look almost Mac-esque on the PC. There are separate windows to access your organiser, calendar, movies, photos and almost everything else, as well as being able to send text messages from your PC.

...

We've often said we're fans of this interface, and nice touches like being able to configure the system so that drag-and-drop files were automatically converted to a more phone-friendly format were a real bonus. A common feature of mobile phone PC software is the ability to encode files to fit the handset, and while this is possible here (for instance with MP3 playback from other less well-liked formats) the sheer amount of codecs supported (MP4, DivX, AVI) mean that you're very unlikely to need to, which is a real bonus.

We'd go as far as saying the new software was actually a new reason to connect the phone to a PC, other than as a modem or to back up contacts, as it adds a whole new dimension to the Samsung Jet S8000.

...

You can always use the phone as a modem as well, which might not please your network (especially if it's O2), although if you don't constantly use your Jet for surfing day in, day out, you might just get away with it (and also be sticking two fingers up to Apple iPhone 3G / 3GS users as well).

...

We've noted the Samsung Jet S8000 feels a little cheap on numerous occasions. To be fair to the designers, it's meant to be a slightly less expensive handset in order to entice the more tech-savvy consumer who doesn't want to throw oodles of hard-earned cash at his or her new phone.

We liked

Overall, although there's a lot to pick at with the Samsung Jet S8000, as a package it just works. We're not sure what it is that tickles our fancy, whether it's the near perfect palm-sized dimensions or the glorious OLED screen, but when we usually find niggles with a phone we start to dislike it quickly.

The opposite has happened here. We weren't sure with the hands on, but quickly warmed to a phone that does manage to do a whole lot and do it well. The music and media on it may be a little lightweight, but is certainly up to the task (especially recording from the radio) and the camera is an excellent bit of hardware in a teeny package.

...

The verdict

The Samsung Jet S8000 is a phone that does a lot of things, and does them pretty well, and all in a small and well formed package. We're not sure about calling it affordable when it's hitting the market at around £350 SIM free, although it is significantly cheaper than its rivals and is on offer for some pretty cheap contract deals too.

When reviewing these products you start to get a feel for the star rating as you go, and we believed this was going to be a nailed-on 3.5/5 as we started to explore the intricacies of the Samsung Jet S8000. But weirdly there's a sense that it works, the package comes together to offer a good proposition that will satisfy many but heavily impress few, so the final score isn't too bad in the end.

Samsung has had a really good effort with the Jet S8000, making a phone full of decent hardware and not forcing users to break the bank to pick it up. It's good, but we feel it could have been a lot better with some very minor tweaks.

Overall, the Jet S8000 is worth looking at for those that love their technology but have a bit of a budget to work to.

http://www.techradar.com/reviews/phones/mobile-phones/samsung-jet-s8000-611815/review/page:13#articleContent

 

So without the selective quoting, it turns out not to be the dog you implied.

 

The GSMArena review was positive, concluding:

 

Quote:

Anyway, the Samsung Jet is bound to rub shoulders with devices that fall in quite a different price range. But if smartphone skill is a must, you will simply have to dig extra deep in your pocket and asset your sights on Samsung i8910 Omnia HD (for the features) or an Apple iPhone (for the attitude). But hey, if some delighted Jet user should tell you their device kicks the snot out of Omnia HD and the iPhone, just don't be too quick to laugh it up.

http://www.gsmarena.com/samsung_s8000_jet-review-374.php

 

There were several reasons I bought the jet - value, performance, media playback, the brilliant screen, modem, form factor, but chiefly for the excellent camera.  I gave the phone to my son after his got laundered.  It is still in use and fully functional.  I have several times asked him if he would like something more up-to-date but he keeps turning down the offer saying it still does everything he wants a phone for.

post #62 of 64
Quote:

Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post
 

 

Very classy of you to selectively quote from the techradar review.  Some bits you missed:

 

 

At some point in this thread you seem to have become mistaken that I, or anybody else, care about you, your phone, your location, your family, your friends, or even your opinion, although it was rather amusing to be accused of lacking class by a gentleman who posted up a picture of the Apple symbol giving oral sex to the Android logo only just recently, which was subsequently removed by the moderators after being reported.

 

Somehow, you just don't have me convinced of your claimed objectivity, Mr Apple-User-but-Constant-Abuser.

 

Go play with your phone, boy.

Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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post #63 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

 

At some point in this thread you seem to have become mistaken that I, or anybody else, care about you, your phone, your location, your family, your friends, or even your opinion, although it was rather amusing to be accused of lacking class by a gentleman who posted up a picture of the Apple symbol giving oral sex to the Android logo only just recently, which was subsequently removed by the moderators after being reported.

 

Somehow, you just don't have me convinced of your claimed objectivity, Mr Apple-User-but-Constant-Abuser.

 

Go play with your phone, boy.

 

Personal insults, how unusual of you to employ such a decisive argument winning stratagem.

 

Oh, wait...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

Your boyfriend has some serious quality concern issues then, and I'm not just talking about the tablet... (>_<)

You'd have to be aware of what you did before feeling embarrassment and this obviously isn't the case here.
Please try and stay aware from any dangerous machinery for the rest of your life.

Guys who use the word 'Adonis' in their username probably shouldn't talk about 'embarrassment'.

I'd hate to be the bearer of bad tidings, but you just went and posted something silly.
Sarcasm: It's not for everybody.
Time to switch to a different username again to avoid embarrassment?

(By the way, Scott, you don't need to sign your name at the end of your post. It's right there in your username on the left.)

Sincerest,
GTR

Your mother must be very proud of you!
Joined up handwriting can't be far behind...

(Yeah, we worked out you were five from your last post)
post #64 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post

Personal insults, how unusual of you to employ such a decisive argument winning stratagem.

 

Oh, wait...

 

 

Would you like some tissues for your issues?

 

Recognition of stupidity (or, personal insults, as you call them) does not mean that what was said was not a fact, and I'd say a 'decisive argument winning stratagem' probably was achieved more from your inability to respond, rather than any of my responses.

 

And let's face it, it's treatment like this that brings you Apple-Haters to this forum.

 

You're finally getting that attention that you've always wanted!

 

Enjoy! (>_<)

Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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