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San Diego school district buys 26K iPads for students - Page 2

post #41 of 83
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I wouldn't say as useless but I would say that tech can often just as easily be a great tool for learning as much as it is a great distraction from learning.

 

if Tech is a distraction it is being poorly utilized because that doesn't just mean handing it to kids or picking out a few apps or books. It means eliminating potential issues before they arise. Like investigating whether you can look out certain functions either on the device or via blocking access to problem websites network wide at the router. It means developing usage rules and rules of responsibility and having parents agree to back up the school if a kid breaks the rules by jail breaking their iPad or restoring it to remove the lock on the app store and the school wants to suspend or expel them. and so on. 

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post #42 of 83

I find this interesting ... given that for the last four years the San Diego Unified School District has been shuttering schools and laying off thousands of support staff and teachers.  I was watching a report the other day on the local news that was talking about how the School District is still operating on a several million dollar budget shortfall, and was expected to cut back on several services. 

 

While I think buying 26K iPads would help the educational process I have to question, at least tacitly, the wisdom in spending such an exorbitant amount of money when they don't have any to begin with ... 

post #43 of 83
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Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

 

That being said, I AM in support of technology such as iPads in class. Wholeheartedly, at that. Whatever helps, helps. Though reliance on technology to make a subject more interesting or palatable is a bad habit, but one that begins with students, not teachers. 

 

 

Tech in classrooms can be used to address a fundamental issue that many schools either don't recognize or simply choose to ignore. Not all people learn the same. Some people can read a book and they get the information. Some can't. I would say many can't. And yet they are all taught the same because of the inherent limits in the current tech. Well thought out and designed tech based tools can get you the text for those that learn that way, the visuals for those that learn that way. 

 

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post #44 of 83

Sorry to say this your wife is teaching in a school that doesn't know what it is doing.

 

You mean not even one teacher takes the initiative to make the effort to integrate a great learning tool into the system.

 

Then it says a lot about the administration of the school including your good wife.

post #45 of 83
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Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Absolutely. While properly implemented and with a parent/teacher who is fully qualified, home schooling CAN provide a superior education. Unfortunately, in far too many cases, it's "we don't want our kids being exposed to science or kids from other cultures" so the kids end up getting short-changed.
While there are idiots and bigots in public schools, too, at least the kids get a new teacher every year - so it is unlikely that they'll never be exposed to real science.

 

Unless your kids are in a school where the whole district believes the same thing and dictates what can and can't be taught and demands that 'false' ideas be stripped from the textbooks being used so the kiddies aren't exposed to that evil. There are a couple of districts in Texas that are that way. 

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post #46 of 83
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Originally Posted by Squeak View Post

 Since the books purchased via the iBooks store belong to the student and require an Apple ID, .

 

And if the school owns that Apple ID, they not the students own the books. Classes were the kids are old enough might utilize things like FaceTime or iMessages for pen pals or such but even then the store ID can be owned by the school and totally out of student control. 

 

Or if they are giving the iPads to the kids and want them to have 'ownership' of the apps to keep for all time, they can simply require the parents to sign up an Apple ID on behalf of the kids and hand it over to the kiddies when Mommy and Daddy see fit. that's what my parents are doing for my brothers. Caleb (15) has an ID with no credit card on it and if he wants to buy something like a game he has to use his allowance and get a gift card to pay for it (his fav birthday present in fact). If it is for school, Dad gifts it to him). But Ethan and Ian (only 12) don't have control of their IDs yet and won't until they are 13 at which time they play by the same rules. 


Edited by charlituna - 6/26/12 at 10:18am

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post #47 of 83
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Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

 

And if the school owns that Apple ID, they not the students own the books. 

 

That is strictly forbidden in the T&C's of purchasing the books. Due to the lower costs of the books ($15 vs $75), the book is intended for use by one and only one student.

 

http://www.apple.com/education/volume-purchase-program/faq.html#ownership

 

 

 

Quote:

Who owns the content purchased by an institution through the Volume Purchase Program?

In the case of books, the student as the end user must redeem the book using his or her own Apple ID, and the student owns the book. Please see the iOS 5 Education Deployment Guide for more information.

post #48 of 83
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Originally Posted by jasenj1 View Post

And do they have funding for the ongoing IT infrastructure required? Do they have a curriculum strategy? Are they providing training for the teachers?

 

Sorry, but color me skeptical. Shiny toys are nice, but schools (at least in my area) are consumed with drilling students to pass the standardized tests. Actual education is secondary to assuring the kids can pass the tests.

 

- Jasen.

You apparently don't understand the average school system very well. First, every school system has some kind of IT infrastructure in place. Even the smallest school system has a lot of computers for staff and teachers. Even the smallest have some computers in the classrooms too. Interestingly enough, because Macs are easier to manage, a much larger percent of school systems use Macs then in the business sector. 

Any purchases for the classrooms require a proposal by the teachers to show how the computers or iPads are going to be used in the classroom to promote education. This gets special attention if it can improve classroom scores. Unlike, how you may be imagining it, a purchase of this nature is done very deliberately and carefully with a thought out plan behind it. Classroom sizes are increasing while more is being required from the teacher. iPads allows more students to be engaged in learning; especially the slower and the faster learners. Because the learning modules are designed to appeal to more of the senses, the natural curiosity of the student is awakened, and more is learned. There is much more to the utilization of iPads in the classroom, but what I just described is the core if it.

 

Full disclosure: I am not an educator, nor have any horses in that race. I'm just well informed.

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post #49 of 83
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Originally Posted by kkerst View Post
But why do the kids still suck at basic math skills? 

 

One reason for that is that some kids don't learn the same as others. They can't just read some abstract instructions in a book or hear them said by a teacher and 'get it'. They need to see it in a more practical light. See it applied somehow in a way that relates to them. Things like those corny Schoolhouse Rock videos make sense to them. Activities like trying to measure the height of a flagpole based on the distance of the shadow and the angle from the point where the shadow ends to the top, makes sense to them. Even just getting kids to calculate real life examples like run a fake store and figure out your profit and taxes and how much product to order makes sense to them. 

 

Other kids just need to go through drill after drill for it to sink in. And yes dumb things like blasting rocket ships or dancing monkeys break up the stress for them. An iPad app can adjust the difficulty of the exercises so that they aren't getting frustrated with wrong answer after wrong answer and they can see that they have passed level one, two, three etc. That can be way better than all the D graded papers in the world for making them want to learn and keeping them from feeling like morons (which makes them less likely to really want to try to do better)

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post #50 of 83
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Originally Posted by Squeak View Post

 

That is strictly forbidden in the T&C's of purchasing the books. Due to the lower costs of the books ($15 vs $75), the book is intended for use by one and only one student.

 

http://www.apple.com/education/volume-purchase-program/faq.html#ownership

 

 

 

This the same T & C of a lot of classroom materials, such as printed workbooks that are only used once and disposed of. Tons of printed materials hit the dumpsters at the end of each year. Content on an iPad is actually a lot better deal for the schools.

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post #51 of 83
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Originally Posted by blursd View Post

 

While I think buying 26K iPads would help the educational process I have to question, at least tacitly, the wisdom in spending such an exorbitant amount of money when they don't have any to begin with ... 

 

Reading comp fail. This money was voted by the public in that area specifically and solely to buy tech. If said public wants to change that it is in their power. If they haven't made that effort then they don't seem to see an issue with it. 

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post #52 of 83
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Originally Posted by Squeak View Post

 

That is strictly forbidden in the T&C's of purchasing the books. Due to the lower costs of the books ($15 vs $75), the book is intended for use by one and only one student.

 

http://www.apple.com/education/volume-purchase-program/faq.html#ownership

 

That rule is specific to the Volume Purchasing Program. There's no rule that Schools have to use the VPP for anything much less books. If they choose not to go through the program they can do what they like on that one. It doesn't equal them not having an ID for every iPad so there's no issue of them trying to play cheap etc.

 

And as I said, they can always require the parents to sign up of an ID on behalf of the kids or use their ID. So the issue isn't an issue at all.  

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post #53 of 83
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Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

 

That rule is specific to the Volume Purchasing Program. There's no rule that Schools have to use the VPP for anything much less books. If they choose not to go through the program they can do what they like on that one. It doesn't equal them not having an ID for every iPad so there's no issue of them trying to play cheap etc.

 

And as I said, they can always require the parents to sign up of an ID on behalf of the kids or use their ID. So the issue isn't an issue at all.  

 

I am not sure I understand exactly what you are trying to get across, but I think my point still stands:

 

- Saying that the books for the under-13 crowd will come from the iBooks store is misguided. Given that you have to be 13 to have an ID, and the student is suppose to redeem the book with their own ID, Publishers are not going to put books into the store that target that range. Until Apple comes up with a comprehensive distribution system that takes into account the true funding model of K-12 schools (including ownership of the books), the library of titles that publishers produce will be minimum, and targeted to the 13+ crowd.

post #54 of 83
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Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

 

Unless your kids are in a school where the whole district believes the same thing and dictates what can and can't be taught and demands that 'false' ideas be stripped from the textbooks being used so the kiddies aren't exposed to that evil. There are a couple of districts in Texas that are that way. 

You bring up a good point. For several decades a small group of people in Texas has been dictating what information can be included in school books for Texas students. Because it costs a lot to print up a school book, publishers have only produced one version: the version approved for Texas schools. With the movement away from PRINTED texts, it is possible to produce content for various areas. For example, the history of the dark side of Christianity or other religions in shaping and forming policy towards Indians, blacks and other minorities in the U.S. has been totally stripped from American and world history by the Texas committee. Students today have no broad understanding of our actual history.

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post #55 of 83
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Originally Posted by paxman View Post

For your old fogeys - education is a living, moving thing which evolves. When I see schools that look like and use methods that were used when I was a kid, I get pissed off. Workplaces and business practices have changed a lot over the years and so must education. If you stand still you are moving backwards.

 

Let me introduce you to something called Classical Education. It's worked for a long time and still does.


Edited by jasenj1 - 6/26/12 at 11:18am
post #56 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

 

Reading comp fail. This money was voted by the public in that area specifically and solely to buy tech. If said public wants to change that it is in their power. If they haven't made that effort then they don't seem to see an issue with it. 

How exactly is this a "reading comprehension problem"?  Yes, the money came from a voter approved initiative, but the original assertion I made that the District doesn't have any money and is laying off teachers, staff, closing schools, and cutting back on basic services ... yet buys 26,000 iPads.  Who cares if the money came from a voter initiative ... sure, the kids will have the latest technology, but there will be 60 kids to every teacher ... they still won't learn anything.  

 

It's called misplaced priorities.  Maybe you should exercise some "reading comprehension" of your own and go back and read what I wrote ... 

post #57 of 83
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Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

Unless your kids are in a school where the whole district believes the same thing and dictates what can and can't be taught and demands that 'false' ideas be stripped from the textbooks being used so the kiddies aren't exposed to that evil. There are a couple of districts in Texas that are that way. 

Then I would suggest that you contact the State Attorney General and demand that they comply with Supreme Court rulings. Or file suit yourself. Or put the kids in a private school. Or home school the kids. Or move.

Ignorance wins when no one takes action.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

You bring up a good point. For several decades a small group of people in Texas has been dictating what information can be included in school books for Texas students. Because it costs a lot to print up a school book, publishers have only produced one version: the version approved for Texas schools. With the movement away from PRINTED texts, it is possible to produce content for various areas. For example, the history of the dark side of Christianity or other religions in shaping and forming policy towards Indians, blacks and other minorities in the U.S. has been totally stripped from American and world history by the Texas committee. Students today have no broad understanding of our actual history.

That's absolutely the case. Given the relative low cost of producing eBooks, it is likely that a more diverse range of books will become available. While it is impossible today to have different text books for the idiots who deny evolution, causing evolution to be watered down in all books, it would be relatively inexpensive to simply cut evolution out of a text book and sell it as 'science for idiots' to the school districts like those listed above.

It's too bad that some people insist in crippling their children's education, but it's a free country. I'd settle for them not being able to ruin it for everyone else.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squeak View Post

"The district has not indicated exactly what software students will use, though a likely candidate would be Apple`s own iBooks software"
and

"The iPad 2 units will be utilized in 5th- and 8th-grade classrooms, as well as some high school classes."

don't really go together. Since the books purchased via the iBooks store belong to the student and require an Apple ID, it is only available to students ages 13 and older. That means you are looking at ~8th grade and above.

What will probably happen is that a lot of the main publishers are coming up with their own proprietary apps to deliver books that are part of a subscription that district pays directly to the publisher. I know that both McGraw-Hill and Pearson have offerings in the store to do exactly that.

How do you know that iBooks won't offer some volume licensing program for schools that gets around that age limit?
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post #58 of 83
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Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

How do you know that iBooks won't offer some volume licensing program for schools that gets around that age limit?

 

I don't -- I have no clue what Apple's plan is to fix their K-12 implementation model (and I really do hope for a change as I work in the digital part of one of the big 3 publishers).

 

But until that point what I do know is that you have to be 13 in the US to have an Apple ID, and you have to use that Apple ID to purchase/redeem a book.

post #59 of 83
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Originally Posted by blursd View Post

How exactly is this a "reading comprehension problem"?  Yes, the money came from a voter approved initiative, but the original assertion I made that the District doesn't have any money and is laying off teachers, staff, closing schools, and cutting back on basic services ... yet buys 26,000 iPads.  Who cares if the money came from a voter initiative ... sure, the kids will have the latest technology, but there will be 60 kids to every teacher ... they still won't learn anything.  

It's called misplaced priorities.  Maybe you should exercise some "reading comprehension" of your own and go back and read what I wrote ... 

Sorry, but I trust the San Diego school board more than some random stranger on AI. If you think they're wrong, run for School Board.
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post #60 of 83

It will be interesting to see how the service life shakes out for iPads going back and forth to school w/ kids... I hope they bought an extended Applecare warranty!

 

FWIW, when I was maintaining the computers in my middle school, I spent 90% of my one period as Computer/Network manager time babying the 32 PCs in the computer lab and 10% of my time with the 40 Mac desktop machines in my Industrial Technology lab, the 42 Mac desktops scattered around the school in other classrooms and the 30+/- Mac laptops signed out to teachers. All student machines were locked down tight with Foolproof with no file saving allowed onto the HD. I still had to regularly wipe and reload the PCs in the lab every couple of weeks due to so many problems w/ Windows and the apps. LOTS of hardware issues in there too. Biggest problem with the Macs was the need to occasionally zap PRAM to improve performance and occasionally clean the keyboards. (BTW, this was pre-infrared mice, so we glued the mouse ball doors shut!)

-e

post #61 of 83
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Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


The district has not indicated exactly what software students will use, though a likely candidate would be Apple`s own iBooks software, which was enhanced for digital textbooks with the release of iBooks 2 early this year. The iPad 2 units will be utilized in 5th- and 8th-grade classrooms, as well as some high school classes.

This is the big question. To my knowledge none of the standard textbooks which are currently in use in our school district have been converted to iBooks. I have several of those science and social studies books right here on my desk as we are evaluating a methodology to convert the books. The main problem as I see it is that the current printed books are of really high quality with 100s of pages and extremely rich in graphics. Converting them verbatim to iBooks would create files many gigabytes in size not to mention that the new medium lends itself to the inclusion of video which makes the files even larger. I hope the SD school district did not commit to using iPads with nothing to run on them.

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post #62 of 83

I hope that this trend of adopting iPads in schools is a wake up call to all educational content providers such as Raz-Kids.com which still use flash. My daughter's school has participated in successful iPad pilot but also uses Raz-Kids.com to access online books for kids. I have talk to the customer support and Raz-Kids have no plans of dropping the flash. Baffling.

post #63 of 83
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Originally Posted by IsmOfAm View Post

I hope that this trend of adopting iPads in schools is a wake up call to all educational content providers such as Raz-Kids.com which still use flash. My daughter's school has participated in successful iPad pilot but also uses Raz-Kids.com to access online books for kids. I have talk to the customer support and Raz-Kids have no plans of dropping the flash. Baffling.

 

Actually, I can speak to that as well -- Flash is not going anywhere in K-12 education anytime soon.

 

For publishers/content producers, there is no single technology to build their content in that will work with all browsers, and it is usually too costly to do dual-development in Flash and HTML5. So, if you go for the largest market penetration when you can only pick one technology, Flash still is the clear winner.

 

Some stats that support our decision to still support Flash:

 

- Over 50% of our users to our websites still view the site in a browser that does not support HTML5

- We are only seeing 1% of the usage coming from an iOS device.

 

So you either choose to pick one technology that cuts off 1%, or the other that cuts off 50%. 

post #64 of 83
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Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

I wonder what the service life of a $370 iPad is compared to a $370 Windows laptop. And what the support costs are for each over time. And how the resale value of each compares when remaining devices are retired.

 

This is probably HUGE savings, above and beyond being a great educational tool.

And then there's versus the paper textbooks.

post #65 of 83
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Originally Posted by muadibe View Post

This is the wave of the future. Most schools will have a tablet of some kind, mostly iPads.

 

It will be interesting to see what brand of tablets are deployed by South Korean schools.

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post #66 of 83

Graphic in the San Jose Mercury News that shows the different TCO for iPad's versus Textbooks, assuming 100% adoption of either platform.

 

They assumed a different price for the iPad, but you can see that upfront costs does not change much.

 

 

image002 (2).jpg

post #67 of 83
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Originally Posted by Squeak View Post

 

Some stats that support our decision to still support Flash:

 

- Over 50% of our users to our websites still view the site in a browser that does not support HTML5

- We are only seeing 1% of the usage coming from an iOS device.

 

So you either choose to pick one technology that cuts off 1%, or the other that cuts off 50%. 

You can do a lot with CSS2 and JS which all browsers support. Adding HTML5 only gets you a few things like the canvas tag which is of limited usefulness at the moment and HTML5 is not necessary to view video because it can be dynamically streamed in different codecs without much additional work. Embellishing your layouts with rounded corners and shadows is nice use of HTML5 but not essential to learning. Since your technology is produced in Flash are you at all surprised that you only have 1% iOS usage? I'm surprised it isn't zero.

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post #68 of 83
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Originally Posted by mstone View Post
Since your technology is produced in Flash are you at all surprised that you only have 1% iOS usage? I'm surprised it isn't zero.

 

Fair point and one I didn't explain well. Our sites are 99% HTML, including the vast majority of interactive assets. But there are times where you need to build instructional material that requires a higher level of interactivity (eBooks with read a-louds, think virtual labs, interactive maps, etc), and that is where the Flash vs. HTML5 debate comes into play.

 

Someone can view the vast majority of our site on mobile Safari without any issue  -- so the 1% number does not represent a population that is underrepresented due to the technology. It instead reflects the current true market for K-12 users in our space.

post #69 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squeak View Post

 

Fair point and one I didn't explain well. Our sites are 99% HTML, including the vast majority of interactive assets. But there are times where you need to build instructional material that requires a higher level of interactivity (eBooks with read a-louds, think virtual labs, interactive maps, etc), and that is where the Flash vs. HTML5 debate comes into play.

 

Someone can view the vast majority of our site on mobile Safari without any issue  -- so the 1% number does not represent a population that is underrepresented due to the technology. It instead reflects the current true market for K-12 users in our space.

I totally agree with you since I am a long time Flash programmer. There are many things that are extremely difficult if not impossible to replicate in HTML5 however with the explosion of iOS in the consumer space and now the same trajectory appearing likely in education you probably shouldn't ignore the trend and be caught flatfooted when your customers abruptly leave for greener iOS pastures.

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post #70 of 83
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Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I totally agree with you since I am a long time Flash programmer. There are many things that are extremely difficult if not impossible to replicate in HTML5 however with the explosion of iOS in the consumer space and now the same trajectory appearing likely in education you probably shouldn't ignore the trend and be caught flatfooted when your customers abruptly leave for greener iOS pastures.

 

Agreed, but there is only so much development dollars available, and it gets smaller every year due to the drastic reduction in purchasing of K-12 materials over the last 5 years (almost a 50% reduction at this point). Thus, you have to be wise with how you spend your dollars.

 

The approach we are taking is to almost skip HTML5 completely. Use normal HTML4 for the vast majority of our products, and Flash for the desktop when the pedagogy calls for it. Then, find those targeted use cases where a native iOS app provides the best bang-for-the-buck, bundle an app. 

post #71 of 83
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Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

We need to move in this direction much, much faster to succeed in the Information Age. I still see computers relegated to a computer lab in schools rather than in every classroom.

 

We setup the first LAN computer lab in June 1980 at Saratoga HS, Saratoga, CA -- 7 Apple ][s, 1 Corvus 5 MB (yes 5 megabyte) HDD, 1 Centronics Printer.  Each Apple ][ had a BW monitor and a Corvus LAN card (The Teacher's Apple ][ had 2 floppy disk drives and the Centronics printer card). The HDD and printer was sharable among all the Apple ][s.

 

I am surprised how little has changed in the intervening 32 years.  When I first moved back to the Bay Area in 2005, I visited my granddaughter's 5th grade class.  They had iMacs in the classroom (about 3 students to each iMac) -- but they were for specialty use -- not part of the regular curriculum.

 

Now, all three grandkids, each have there own iPad...  My granddaughter has matriculated to the local high school -- it has a computer lab, but no electronic devices are allowed in the classroom (somehow phones and smart phones are exempt).

 

I think that there should be 1 iPad per student in every classroom -- it should be used as an integral learning tool to replace paper, pens, books, research, tests, entertainment...

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post #72 of 83
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Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

 

Which is the problem. Take away the "bright and shiny" and what's left?

 

It's like the old tactic of trying to "connect" with kids by incorporating concepts into a rap. Having to call on pop culture to get kids' attention because they couldn't be bothered to be interested otherwise.   ---------->  Self-starters who are eager because they recognize the benefits and later rewards vs. shiny inducements.

 

That being said, I AM in support of technology such as iPads in class. Wholeheartedly, at that. Whatever helps, helps. Though reliance on technology to make a subject more interesting or palatable is a bad habit, but one that begins with students, not teachers. 

 

This problem goes even further up the ladder to college education. 

 

 

The late Professor T.G. Elliott of the Classics Department of the University of Toronto at Mississauga (formerly Erindale College), under whom I had the pleasure of studying for a number of years, had already addressed this issue and others like it years ago in his course syllabi, and he probably wasn't the first one:
 
--------
"Since most members of the class are first-year students, some remarks to them may not be amiss. The university is sometimes referred to as an institution of higher education, a term which is meant to exclude the education which we inflict upon children, or even upon adolescents. It is the education we offer to young (and other) adults in the hope that they will use our assistance in teaching them to think for themselves. There is no expectation that such education can simply be delivered to the student. If the student does not take an active part in his own higher education, he will not obtain it, and will find any degree conferred upon him quite useless. If you find yourself moping through one of the textbooks and sitting sullenly through the lectures, daring the instructor to interest you in the subject, I invite you to reread this paragraph."
 
"The university differs from other institutions of higher learning in offering courses in what used to be called the liberal (as distinct from the servile) arts. These are courses for people who want to learn to think for themselves, rather than direct their efforts immediately towards the earning of a salary, and CLA 160 is one of these courses. Those who are frightened by the thought of taking courses that are not immediately connected with a job, should understand that the facility with the written word, which is taught in liberal arts courses, is what communications depend on."
------------
 
 
Are students not able to relate to the material without all these technological "learning aids"? Are we asking too much of them if these new aids are taken away or not implemented? No doubt they *can* improve attention and increase interest, but this may be indicative of a deeper problem: why are schools feeling pressure to do this? Do these aids enhance an already comprehensive experience, or are they being used as a band-aid to cover up a fundamental lack of eagerness to learn? 

 

Excellent post... the difference is between enabling teaching and enticing/enabling learning!

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post #73 of 83
n
Quote:
Originally Posted by Conrail View Post

I'm skeptical too.  Throwing iPads at students won't help them learn any more than sticking computers in every classroom did in the 1990's. 
Yep! Exactly what my Great Grandfather used to say! LOL
post #74 of 83

I don't live in the San Diego Unified School District ... I live in Carlsbad.  I'd also prefer it if you could keep your self righteous and condescending observations to yourself ... most of which aren't even correct to begin with.  

post #75 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


I think that there should be 1 iPad per student in every classroom -- it should be used as an integral learning tool to replace paper, pens, books, research, tests, entertainment...

This, I am sure, is going to come. The sooner the better. There will be no reason for kids to carry dozens of heavy books around all the time. They will learn to have a natural access to modern time technology, which will help them to survive in a society, that will become more and more dependable on computerized techology.
And to have some fun while learning, can't be to bad either.
post #76 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I think that there should be 1 iPad per student in every classroom -- it should be used as an integral learning tool to replace paper, pens, books, research, tests, entertainment...

Do you imagine they will take them home everyday to do homework or leave them locked up in the classroom at night?

 

Do you think they would be required to purchase them or be issued them?

 

If purchased, low income families would receive reimbursements most likely?

 

We had to by our own TI calculators.

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post #77 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squeak View Post

 

I am not sure I understand exactly what you are trying to get across, but I think my point still stands:

 

Let me repeat it again and I'll stick to small words. 

 

Even if the school wants to use the Volume Purchase Program which requires that each student has a separate ID under his/her control there is nothing to prevent parents of students under 12 (or even 18 if the parents wish) from setting up an ID the parents control on the child's behalf. THAT id would be used for redeeming the school provided codes and would belong to the child's authorized legal representative until such time as said party wishes to turn control over to the child. Problem for the school is solved. And zero need for anyone to limit what they do to any age audience. 

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

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post #78 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by blursd View Post

How exactly is this a "reading comprehension problem"?  Yes, the money came from a voter approved initiative, but the original assertion I made that the District doesn't have any money and is laying off teachers, staff, closing schools, and cutting back on basic services ... yet buys 26,000 iPads. 

 

Because the vote was made. Schools and School Districts don't have the authority to reallocate funds just because they feel like it. Those votes are sacrosanct. IF they want to use the money on something else they have to put that new use to a vote. Something which is costly and time consuming in and of itself. Particularly if, and  it is not uncommon, the assignment of the money to a particularly use carries with it a restriction that it must remain in that use for at least a set period of time. 

 

So unlike how you are trying to paint it no one just decided to fire a crap ton of teaches to use their salaries to buy shiny toys. 

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post #79 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Do you imagine they will take them home everyday to do homework or leave them locked up in the classroom at night?

Do you think they would be required to purchase them or be issued them?

If purchased, low income families would receive reimbursements most likely?

We had to by our own TI calculators.

Never miss an opportunity to learn or advance!  Definitely take them home -- study, D&P, extra credit, compositions/term papers, research, speciality training (music, storyboarding, video editing, podcasts, iTunes U, etc.). They'd probably learn more on one clear evening -- outside with the StarWalk app, than in a semester in a classroom -- and it'd be much more exciting and rewarding.

Both purchased and issued -- reimbursements available for low income -- possibly partially subsidized by Apple, Fed, State & Local govts, Booksellers, App sellers.

Depending on when, the TI (or HP) calculator, likey, cost more in today's $ than an iPad.


The person who has pioneered in this 1:1 iPad:student experiment is Fraser Speirs:

http://fraserspeirs.com/
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post #80 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Do you imagine they will take them home everyday to do homework or leave them locked up in the classroom at night?

Do you think they would be required to purchase them or be issued them?

If purchased, low income families would receive reimbursements most likely?

We had to by our own TI calculators.

Obviously, it may vary, but in my daughter's school, the students got convertible slate tablets a few years ago (before the iPad came out). The school purchased them and maintains them. They're locked down tight and if there's ever a problem, the IT staff simply wipes and reinstalls. Student can only save to flash drives (which parents had to buy).

The parents signed a contract at the beginning of the period stating that if the laptop was lost or broken that the parent would pay for repairs or replacement. Insurance was available at modest cost. The laptop was carried with the student year after year. I believe these originally cost $1500 and my daughter used hers for 5 years before completing 8th grade and going to a different school.

The laptops stayed at the school during the summer, but the students could take them home when they had a project that required them. Any class could assign a project, but they were most heavily used by science, English, and Social Studies.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
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