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ServiceNow IT firm surges on IPO, CEO says company is 'wall-to-wall' Apple

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
IT firm ServiceNow went public on Friday as the company's CEO revealed their operations are "wall-to-wall" reliant on Apple products, including iPhones and MacBooks.

ServiceNow CEO Frank Slootman appeared on CNBC Friday to promote his company's IPO. While live on the set, Slootman was asked about the growth of Apple products in the enterprise.

"Our company, we're all Apple, wall to wall," he revealed. "Not just on the iPhone, also our notebooks, laptops and so on."

Slootman was also asked if the enterprise is "embracing Apple in a surprisingly strong way." To that, he responded: "I believe so."

As of late last year, ServiceNow, which is based in San Diego, Calif., had more than 500 employees. The company plans hire another 400 personnel this year, Slootman revealed Friday, nearly doubling in size. The company has doubled its sales for eight years in a row, and has $130 million in recurring revenue.

ServiceNow
ServiceNow CEO Frank Slootman revealed on Friday his company exclusively uses Apple products.


ServiceNow's initial public offering was up as much as 30 percent on the New York Stock Exchange Friday. It trades under the ticker symbol "NOW."

The IT company was founded in 2003 and is a software-as-a-service provider of IT service management software. Slootman has served as ServiceNow's CEO since 2001.

The company's exclusive use of Apple products is noteworthy as Apple has found recent success in the enterprise, but still hasn't seen the same level of tremendous growth in corporate that it does in

In its quarterly earnings reports, Apple frequently boasts that nearly all Fortune 500 companies are either testing or deploying both the iPhone and the iPad among their employees. Major corporations have also become developers of the iOS platform, and are creating and deploying "mission critical apps" specifically built for their employees, Apple executives revealed in January.
post #2 of 32

Not everybody is happy with that news.

 

steve-ballmer-sweaty-developers.jpg

post #3 of 32
This article is missing some words
post #4 of 32

Service-Now are in the office the floor below where I work.  I thought they were looking happy with themselves this morning!

post #5 of 32
Awaiting the inevitable "I love the Mac as much as the next guy, but for complex applications, you gotta use a PC" post...

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #6 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Awaiting the inevitable "I love the Mac as much as the next guy, but for complex applications, you gotta use a PC" post...

Where are the "OSX will never be enterprise-ready" pundits?

post #7 of 32

Good for them. Now, all other IT people need to wake up.

Apple had me at scrolling
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Apple had me at scrolling
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post #8 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Awaiting the inevitable "I love the Mac as much as the next guy, but for complex applications, you gotta use a PC" post...

"Hey, I mean, I love the Mac as much as any fanboy, but you know, for really, really complex tasks that 98% of business computers are used for, like Word, Excel and .ppt, you really need a PC"

 

There ya go.

post #9 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Awaiting the inevitable "I love the Mac as much as the next guy, but for complex applications, you gotta use a PC" post...

 

I'm awaiting the "where is the update to the Mac Pro? Apple only makes iToys now" whine.

 

So tiresome.

post #10 of 32

And their products are terrible!!! We use this product for incident and change request management. It's lousy. The most gawd-awful user interface you can imagine. It's like stepping back into the late 90's.

post #11 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

 

I'm awaiting the "where is the update to the Mac Pro? Apple only makes iToys now" whine.

 

So tiresome.

And the majority of the people who say that have no intention of buying a Mac Pro regardless and most of them probably couldn't even afford one.

post #12 of 32
Yeah, I think about 80% of AppleInsider commentors are teenagers still living with mommy and daddy.
post #13 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylersdad View Post

And their products are terrible!!! We use this product for incident and change request management. It's lousy. The most gawd-awful user interface you can imagine. It's like stepping back into the late 90's.


You've apparently never used Remedy.

post #14 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post


You've apparently never used Remedy.

I have. That's what Service Now replaced. It's very poor too. A new browser window for pretty much every task you want to perform, but at least it had ways of grouping the various groups within our IT organization. Service Now just gives you a giant list of groups. For our company, it's thousands.

post #15 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post


You've apparently never used Remedy.

 

We switched from Remedy to Service-Now, and Service-Now is much better.

post #16 of 32

I love the Mac as much as the next guy, but for complex applications, you gotta use a PC

Windows survivor - after a long, epic and painful struggle. Very long AAPL

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Windows survivor - after a long, epic and painful struggle. Very long AAPL

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post #17 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Oak View Post

I love the Mac as much as the next guy, but for complex applications, you gotta use a PC

Almost got me fooled. LOL

But if peoble ask for it ......
post #18 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

 

We switched from Remedy to Service-Now, and Service-Now is much better.


My company used to use ServiceCenter (Peregrine/HP). Now, it uses Tivoli (IBM). They aren't in the cloud.

 

From what I see in the demo, the Service-Now tool is quite good (better than either ServiceCenter or Tivoli). I wish my company is using this tool.

post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylersdad View Post

And their products are terrible!!! We use this product for incident and change request management. It's lousy. The most gawd-awful user interface you can imagine. It's like stepping back into the late 90's.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bmason1270 View Post

"Hey, I mean, I love the Mac as much as any fanboy, but you know, for really, really complex tasks that 98% of business computers are used for, like Word, Excel and .ppt, you really need a PC"

 

There ya go.

Yeah, they are wall-to-wall Macs. 99% of their staff is in sales and he probably doesn't realize that the actual application as a service is in Windows using .Net (just guessing) which might explain why it seems so clunky.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #20 of 32
The largest company in the Canadian oil sands muskrat river deposit also has a complete backbone for mission critical systems built ontop of osx server and Apple hardware. That company enjoyed an operating profit of just over $31.5 billion last year, I'd think it's safe to assume osx is totally capable of being integrated anywhere if you put the correct engineering team behind the steering wheel.

The line of not being able to run complex applications is bullshit, I've personally worked at the scotford plant close to Edmonton Alberta and seen the walls of Xserves that drive the upgrading infrastructure and facilities, it's awesome.
post #21 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by jj.yuan View Post


My company used to use ServiceCenter (Peregrine/HP). Now, it uses Tivoli (IBM). They aren't in the cloud.

 

From what I see in the demo, the Service-Now tool is quite good (better than either ServiceCenter or Tivoli). I wish my company is using this tool.

Does the cloud make Service Now an inherently better application?

post #22 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylersdad View Post

Does the cloud make Service Now an inherently better application?

If SN is cloud based does it matter what platform its users use? Or are we talking back-end here?

post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Market_Player View Post

The line of not being able to run complex applications is bullshit, I've personally worked at the scotford plant close to Edmonton Alberta and seen the walls of Xserves that drive the upgrading infrastructure and facilities, it's awesome.

Takes and IT manager with some balls to push an all Mac OS X server platform to a billion dollar company. IT guys that specialize in OS X are in scarce supply. OS X has a server market share close to zero and now with zero support from Apple it seems like a rather odd choice for them to make.

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post #24 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylersdad View Post

Does the cloud make Service Now an inherently better application?


Actually, being in the cloud meant something negative in my mind. After Outlook was moved into the cloud in my company, everyone complained that things became much slower than before. So, I expected a sluggish response when I visited Service Now's demo site. To my surprise, their site is very responsive.

 

I was commenting on the first impression of the application after I poked around their demo site for a while. The rich set of features compared much favorably with ServiceCenter and Tivoli. I am sure my company can't switch to this tool. There is too much inertia.

 

Before we had ServiceCenter, I heard that Remedy was in the bidding war and lost it. So, I assume the Remedy is no better.


Edited by jj.yuan - 6/29/12 at 11:49am
post #25 of 32

"our notebooks, laptops and so on" - Wow their notebooks AND their laptops are Macs! (And this is an IT company?)

post #26 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Market_Player View Post

The largest company in the Canadian oil sands muskrat river deposit also has a complete backbone for mission critical systems built ontop of osx server and Apple hardware. That company enjoyed an operating profit of just over $31.5 billion last year, I'd think it's safe to assume osx is totally capable of being integrated anywhere if you put the correct engineering team behind the steering wheel.
The line of not being able to run complex applications is bullshit, I've personally worked at the scotford plant close to Edmonton Alberta and seen the walls of Xserves that drive the upgrading infrastructure and facilities, it's awesome.

Always liked the idea of xserves. But I wonder what the way forward is for people who have them now that they have been discontinued, are normal Mac computers like the mini capable of taking over when upgrades are needed? I heard some things about chaining Mac Minis thunderbolted together but don't know anything about it.
post #27 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by uberben View Post

Always liked the idea of xserves. But I wonder what the way forward is for people who have them now that they have been discontinued, are normal Mac computers like the mini capable of taking over when upgrades are needed? I heard some things about chaining Mac Minis thunderbolted together but don't know anything about it.

Yep, I was also disappointed when they dropped the xServe.

I can understand that it wasn't a major focus for them nor did they likely make any money at it. But there are other alternatives.

For example, as much as they are opposed to licensing in the consumer space, why not license OS X server only for systems with >2 CPUs (or whatever cutoff they want to use). SOMEONE would have been interested in making the hardware to run OS X in the Enterprise and the OS is quite capable.
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Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


SOMEONE would have been interested in making the hardware to run OS X in the Enterprise and the OS is quite capable.

I think that is another reason they switched to App store for OS X. People were able to run OS X server in a VM using generic hardware. Probably can still do it but it is much more difficult now. I'm holding on to my dmg of SL server. Never know when it might come in handy.

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post #29 of 32

"Not just on the iPhone, also our notebooks, laptops and so on."

 

 

> I wonder what they use for Servers?

post #30 of 32

OS X is very enterprise capable:

 

1. Full disk encryption added with Lion (this is a big MUST HAVE FEATURE for laptops at least)

2. Must join ActiveDirectory (This works rather well, easier than even Windows)

3. Must connect natively to Exchange 2010 (yep and MS Office 2011 Outlook works as well, albeit still waiting on next release)

4. Must be managed remotely and automagically (lock down features, on the fly configurations, etc.)

 

Unfortunately, Apple's Server products are either discontinued, unusable, or dying slowly.  

 

Third party products like Casper Suite from JAMF Software can actually run in Linux w/Tomcat (Java) and manage the Mac's.  

You can even use AD Windows Shares to replicate software repositories, Google has some code out there to escrow the decryption keys, etc.

Puppet and other tools can be used.  A Mac Mini OS X Server in a deployment lab can PXE boot and image many Mac's.

 

Most Tech's versed in Windows haven't looked at a Mac since 1997 when they almost went out of business.  Mac OS 9 and prior

is a joke. Mac OS X is totally different.  OS X is Unix and is a direct port of NeXTStep/OpenStep technology.  NeXT competed with Sun, HP, IBM, DEC, etc.

OS X is a UNIX workstation with a Mac GUI on top.  This is why all the Unix/Linux tech's are using Apple MacBook Pro's. 

post #31 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post


You've apparently never used Remedy.

 

Yes I have (and do).  I feel your pain.

post #32 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBrickley View Post

OS X would be enterprise capable if they somehow managed to include a WINE like PC emulator in with the OS.  One of the big problems for enterprise is that they have custom applications written for the PC platform.  In order to switch, they have to re-write all those applications.  That equals lots of development hours and lots of money, which makes it a lot less attractive.  Reading email and joining your machine to the domain is about 20% of 'capable'.

 

and yes, I know about parallels and fusion.  I run parallels myself, it's a very good product and recommend it highly.

 

 

 

OS X is very enterprise capable:

 

1. Full disk encryption added with Lion (this is a big MUST HAVE FEATURE for laptops at least)

2. Must join ActiveDirectory (This works rather well, easier than even Windows)

3. Must connect natively to Exchange 2010 (yep and MS Office 2011 Outlook works as well, albeit still waiting on next release)

4. Must be managed remotely and automagically (lock down features, on the fly configurations, etc.)

 

Unfortunately, Apple's Server products are either discontinued, unusable, or dying slowly.  

 

Third party products like Casper Suite from JAMF Software can actually run in Linux w/Tomcat (Java) and manage the Mac's.  

You can even use AD Windows Shares to replicate software repositories, Google has some code out there to escrow the decryption keys, etc.

Puppet and other tools can be used.  A Mac Mini OS X Server in a deployment lab can PXE boot and image many Mac's.

 

Most Tech's versed in Windows haven't looked at a Mac since 1997 when they almost went out of business.  Mac OS 9 and prior

is a joke. Mac OS X is totally different.  OS X is Unix and is a direct port of NeXTStep/OpenStep technology.  NeXT competed with Sun, HP, IBM, DEC, etc.

OS X is a UNIX workstation with a Mac GUI on top.  This is why all the Unix/Linux tech's are using Apple MacBook Pro's. 

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