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Apple sued over 'Snow Leopard' moniker in China for $80K - Page 2

post #41 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post

这就是所谓的挤奶在中国的摇钱树,太。

Nothing personal, but can you post in English?  Please.  Thank you.

post #42 of 99

As much as this suit may seem somewhat frivolous, one still has to wonder who is doing Apple's trademark searching for them before they decide on a product's name. A little due diligence would side-step most of these kinds of claims.

post #43 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Grain of Salt View Post

Fair go all, what's with the Chinese bashing!? Apple is the first company to jump on anyone that that uses a similar symbol to its own, or even similar wording. All companies must defend their trademarks or risk having them diluted or losing them. Jiangsu is asking a pittance which shows it is not really interested in the money, just in defending its trademark.

Nope I feel that  little China Co is simply doing it for advertising value and even get paid a bit for it's advertising.

post #44 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


No, no. I'm waiting for trolls to post about how Apple is in the wrong on this one. How Apple is evil for trying to steal the name "Snow Leopard" in China without paying up for it. C'mon, you know they'll find a way to spin it into "Apple is wrong." Just give it some time...

 

I don't think Apple should pay.  The reason is this.  It's not a company that is in any form of competition on any level whatsoever. Do you know how many companies there out there with the name of AAA?  There are ball bearings used for skate boards called Ninja, Motorcycles named Ninja, Ninja kitchen products, etc. I don't see these guys suing each other.  It's just one company that no one has ever really heard of outside their particular market trying to get more visibility off of the fame of Apple.  I mean come on.  Enough.  One is a product name version for a computer Operating System and the other one is a partial name of a company that is in the chemical industry.

 

Apple is eventually going to shelf Snow Leopard as a product they sell when Mountain Lion hits the shelves because they typically only sell two versions at a time to my knowledge since the machines get outdated.

post #45 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post

这就是所谓的挤奶在中国的摇钱树,太。

Ποια είναι απλώς μια μορφή κλοπής.

post #46 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristophB View Post

The people that would confuse what they are selling with an OS made for exclusive hardware..... are not Apple's market. I think it's called satire. If there's a thing in nature called a snow leopard, those guys are screwed. It's prior art whether you are from Adam or chimp.

This is a Trademark not a patent...
post #47 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

As much as this suit may seem somewhat frivolous, one still has to wonder who is doing Apple's trademark searching for them before they decide on a product's name. A little due diligence would side-step most of these kinds of claims.

The iPad case was just a mess. No amount of searching would have changed that. This one... You may be right, then again, Marks are usually only granted in one language or specified languages. There is nothing nothing to indicate this case is at all valid.
post #48 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Grain of Salt View Post

Fair go all, what's with the Chinese bashing!? Apple is the first company to jump on anyone that that uses a similar symbol to its own, or even similar wording. All companies must defend their trademarks or risk having them diluted or losing them. Jiangsu is asking a pittance which shows it is not really interested in the money, just in defending its trademark. Now, Apple will probably fight it as they too want to defend the Snow Leopard name but some sort of small settle will probably be made, maybe allowing both companies to use the name.
Food for thought (pun intended)
http://www.brandchannel.com/home/post/2009/10/06/Apple-Of-Their-i-Apple-Sues-Aussie-Woolworths-Over-Trademark.aspx

They only do it if it something is directly in competition from what I've seen.  But Mac Tools wasn't suing Apple for the Mac, because they are not SIMILAR of a product and are not in direct competition.  The only reason why they had the Apple Music Corp lawsuit is because of iTunes and they didn't want to have confusion, plus they had an agreement.

 

The iPAD and the iPad lawsuit was because of the actual name and they were both computer related products.

post #49 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zozman View Post

Im from Australia :) I have no idea what that is :p never heard of it & we don't have it as far as i know. funny must not be your field, remember what i said about explaining jokes :p thats cool, wont judge, lets stick with apple products & how we all love them & how we hate everyone else that likes stuff that we dont :p

On a side note, i have friends on facebook, massive android fans, popular opionion amunst those guys seems to be that apple is a massive patent troll & dont like competition :S

 

Dude, funny is funny does, and using a Japanese language joke on the Chinese just ISN'T funny. It's like trying to imitate an American by using an English accent. It just doesn't match.
post #50 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristophB View Post


The people that would confuse what they are selling with an OS made for exclusive hardware..... are not Apple's market. I think it's called satire. If there's a thing in nature called a snow leopard, those guys are screwed. It's prior art whether you are from Adam or chimp.


There is former art called "an apple" in nature. It was his point :p

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

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post #51 of 99

the sharks have tasted blood !

post #52 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

 

I don't think Apple should pay.  The reason is this.  It's not a company that is in any form of competition on any level whatsoever. Do you know how many companies there out there with the name of AAA?  There are ball bearings used for skate boards called Ninja, Motorcycles named Ninja, Ninja kitchen products, etc. I don't see these guys suing each other.  It's just one company that no one has ever really heard of outside their particular market trying to get more visibility off of the fame of Apple.  I mean come on.  Enough.  One is a product name version for a computer Operating System and the other one is a partial name of a company that is in the chemical industry.

 

Apple is eventually going to shelf Snow Leopard as a product they sell when Mountain Lion hits the shelves because they typically only sell two versions at a time to my knowledge since the machines get outdated.


Yes, it's a frivolous and ridiculous suit. However, as "A Grain Of Salt" pointed out, Apple themselves have filed that kind of ridiculous suit already, so... lawyers, rejoyce.

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

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post #53 of 99

God, what a bunch of opportunistic slime bags. So can the west start "suing' these Chinese companies for benefitting from western chemistry, electricity, mass production equipment, you-name-it, which allowed them to even know how chemicals work in the first place, let alone be able to manufacture them?

 

Apple, take these idiots to court and run them into total bankruptcy, please. This has to stop now.

post #54 of 99

!

post #55 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Grain of Salt View Post

Fair go all, what's with the Chinese bashing!? Apple is the first company to jump on anyone that that uses a similar symbol to its own, or even similar wording. All companies must defend their trademarks or risk having them diluted or losing them. Jiangsu is asking a pittance which shows it is not really interested in the money, just in defending its trademark. 

Uh, have you been paying attention at all to the death of a thousand cuts the Chinese have been dishing out to western and Japanese companies the last 20 years via patent infringement, intellectual property theft, pirated goods, etc. on a scale unprecedented in modern history? Equally appalling are the western 'globalization' apologists who are quite happy to close down their factories in North America and Europe to follow the labor to where it's cheapest. Ironically, 'Communist' China seems to not uphold labor standards and effectively bans labor unions.

 

'Why innovate when you can steal' must surely be the unwritten motto of the CPC and many Chinese businesses in general. Personally I think all western companies/nations should form a NATO-type alliance to prevent them from playing one western company/country off the other. Now. 

 

 Apple MUST simply refuse to pay once now, or many times down the road, rather than give in to this 'price of admission for doing business in China' nonsense (they still need us much more than we need them). If 80K is such a pittance and the 'honorable' businessmen in question are simply defending 'their' trademark, why not just ask Apple for a dollar? Face it pal, 80K can buy a lot of chop-sticks.

post #56 of 99

The thing that gets me about these Chinese trademark claims is there insistence on a letter of apology.  Really?  Is that going to make things peachy?  Maybe if Apple uses pretty stationary and includes some flowers....

post #57 of 99

The thing that gets me about these Chinese trademark claims is there insistence on a letter of apology.  Really?  Is that going to make things peachy?  Maybe if Apple uses pretty stationary and includes some flowers....

post #58 of 99

Some of you guys are complete morons. Google suggests that the population of China is over 1.3 billion. Remarks about China and copying most likely apply to a very small percentage of these individuals. Companies that manufacture there accept the good and bad aspects of doing so. The US provides them with a stable banking system. China provides extremely large quantities of cheap labor. This is factored against the cost of doing business there which would include any issues with government stability, costs involving PR concerns such as child labor, lawsuits, etc. It's just an issue of benefits and risks. This would be the case with any country chosen as a primary base for manufacturing.

 

I'm not including the Proview issue in this statement. That relates to worldwide trademark negotiation and "seller's remorse". The owner was not Chinese. Anyway I'm tired of the Chinese bashing. If the concerns outweighed the benefits, companies would have moved on.

post #59 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

Nothing personal, but can you post in English?  Please.  Thank you.

 

Copy it and then paste it into translate.google.com :)

post #60 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeromeus View Post

Stupid Chinese and their corrupted communist government.  Never deal with the communist.

We, non-communist Vietnamese, always say, "Never believe what a communist says; carefully observe a communist's action.

Apparently, they listen to us because their observe their own corrupted actions.  When Apple gave in, they pile on another stupid frivolous lawsuit.  This is why I despise communism and would never ever do business with such a corrupted entity.

If you really think that the Chinese are communist, you don't understand a thing in our world.
post #61 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemyNX View Post

If you really think that the Chinese are communist, you don't understand a thing in our world.

Just saying, but,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Five Seconds… 
The People's Republic of China is a single-party state governed by the Communist Party of China.

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post #62 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by russgriz View Post

In other news, one of the world's oldest partnerships is suing Apple Inc. for use of their trademark.  Said a representative, "I think our usage of the Apple is firmly established.  You will find evidence in any motel room nightstand.  For use of our trademark, we demand that Apple take it's fair share of Original Sin."

Signed,
Adam and Eve Inc.
Now this is a joke gone rotten LOL
...you know, ummm, that their is real "adam and eve inc", they are in the adult film and the NSFW adult toy business... and adam and eve inc most like uses apple computers to edit the adult films they produce...
Edited by haar - 7/3/12 at 4:34am
post #63 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

As much as this suit may seem somewhat frivolous, one still has to wonder who is doing Apple's trademark searching for them before they decide on a product's name. A little due diligence would side-step most of these kinds of claims.

In most of the world, this situation would not be a problem. A trademark is issued for a class of products. That is, you file for a trademark in only a specific field. Apple obtained a trademark for Snow Leopard in the field of computer operating system software. But that doesn't prevent getting a trademark in an unrelated field. In the US, there are also "snow leopard" trademarks in remote controlled toys, vodka, basketball teams, motorcycle accessories, and films. This is not uncommon for the same trademark to be granted to different companies in different markets.

If there is a dispute, a court would have to decide if one trademark infringed on the other. When this happens, it generally comes down to the standard of whether the newer trademark causes confusion with consumers. In the above example, it is unlikely that a consumer would be confused between a motorcycle saddle bag and computer operating system software, so the trademarks can coexist. OTOH, in the case of 'Apple' itself, there was enough concern as to whether Apple (the computer company) was infringing on the trademark of Apple (the music company) that it had to go to court and eventually an agreement was reached.

Now, I'm not saying that this is what happened in China because I don't know Chinese law. But your assumption that Apple failed on trademark searching is not necessarily valid. If Chinese law is similar, it is entirely possible that Apple did a search and concluded that there would be no confusion between a laundry detergent and operating system software. The Chinese company apparently disagrees and the courts will have to hear it. It is entirely possible that Apple did sufficient due diligence and figured it wasn't a problem.
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post #64 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemyNX View Post

If you really think that the Chinese are communist, you don't understand a thing in our world.

I guess I must have missed the news that China changed to a democracy. When did that happen?

China is self-defined as a Communist state. Whether they meet some arbitrary definition of 'communist' is not really the point (and clearly they are including some major elements of capitalism, at least in how their businesses are run). The government calls itself communist, so I think it's reasonable to do so.
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post #65 of 99
So after Apple caved into Proview, the small fry patent trolls figure Apple is an easy mark.
post #66 of 99

So, how many people are going to be confused by household chemicals like detergents and toothpaste and a computer OS?

 

Toothpaste/detergent powered Macs coming to a Chinese store near you...

post #67 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post

Some of you guys are complete morons. Google suggests that the population of China is over 1.3 billion. Remarks about China and copying most likely apply to a very small percentage of these individuals. Companies that manufacture there accept the good and bad aspects of doing so. The US provides them with a stable banking system. China provides extremely large quantities of cheap labor. This is factored against the cost of doing business there which would include any issues with government stability, costs involving PR concerns such as child labor, lawsuits, etc. It's just an issue of benefits and risks. This would be the case with any country chosen as a primary base for manufacturing.

 

I'm not including the Proview issue in this statement. That relates to worldwide trademark negotiation and "seller's remorse". The owner was not Chinese. Anyway I'm tired of the Chinese bashing. If the concerns outweighed the benefits, companies would have moved on.

China is well known for copying. It's not a small percentage. I can list countless examples of Chinese companies copying other companies products, but I don't feel the need to do so. The Chinese government copies as well. For a few quick examples, the Chinese J-11B fighter is basically a knockoff of Russia's Su-27. JAC Motors in China unveiled their new truck earlier in the year. It's an exact carbon copy of the Ford F-150. The Chinese don't innovate, they copy is the bottom line. 

post #68 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boltsfan17 View Post

China is well known for copying. It's not a small percentage. I can list countless examples of Chinese companies copying other companies products, but I don't feel the need to do so. The Chinese government copies as well. For a few quick examples, the Chinese J-11B fighter is basically a knockoff of Russia's Su-27. JAC Motors in China unveiled their new truck earlier in the year. It's an exact carbon copy of the Ford F-150. The Chinese don't innovate, they copy is the bottom line. 

While there's some truth to what you say, it's exaggerated.

1. Not all Chinese companies act that way - and respect for intellectual property is increasing.

2. I believe that China licensed the SU-27 from the former Soviet Union. They didn't just start copying.

There are certainly cases where they have done so, but it's not as universal as you imply.
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post #69 of 99
From the Article dudes:

"Jiangsu Xuebao used the trademark to market a touchscreen ad display and a mobile EPR software suite."

Touchscreen...
Software suite...

Read.
post #70 of 99
Daily chemical may be a subsidiary of a larger corporation...


http://xuebao.en.ec21.com/
post #71 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wetlander View Post

http://xuebao.en.ec21.com/
Quote:
We are the largest manufacturer in China specialized in producing fine mist spray pumps, cream pumps, lotion pumps and the relative plastic containers for cosmetic & pharmaceutical packaging.

Sounds real computery.

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post #72 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Quote:
We are the largest manufacturer in China specialized in producing fine mist spray pumps, cream pumps, lotion pumps and the relative plastic containers for cosmetic & pharmaceutical packaging.
Sounds real computery.

Mmm... not too computery, but maybe also a subsidiary.  My conspiracy theorist thinks they are wholly-owned by Google and Apple is in real trouble.

post #73 of 99
Quote:
Snow Reopard
that is freaking hilarious! kk
live & let live
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live & let live
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post #74 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radar View Post

God, what a bunch of opportunistic slime bags. So can the west start "suing' these Chinese companies for benefitting from western chemistry, electricity, mass production equipment, you-name-it, which allowed them to even know how chemicals work in the first place, let alone be able to manufacture them?

 

Apple, take these idiots to court and run them into total bankruptcy, please. This has to stop now.


The problem is, the Chinese will sue over the patent for gunpowder, get an injunction and take over the world without anyone else firing a shot. ;-)

post #75 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zozman View Post

First of all, explaining a joke ruins it, second of off, ive been to hong kong & Japan, i know the difference, but a joke is for laughs, I thought you might get funny, you know because of your user name? :p

This wasn't even funny when "I Love Lucy" did it - overused, repetitive stereotyping is just not funny.

post #76 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


Just saying, but,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Five Seconds… 
The People's Republic of China is a single-party state governed by the Communist Party of China.

Yeah, but it's a bit like the "Citizens for a Clean Environment" actually being a front for coal producers - the name does not really mean anything. The Chinese government is not a Communist state - no country actually is, or ever was. Oh, and it's also not a Republic either.

post #77 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by elroth View Post

The Chinese government is not a Communist state - no country actually is, or ever was.

Looks like you have some editing to do over there, then.

162

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post #78 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by elroth View Post

Yeah, but it's a bit like the "Citizens for a Clean Environment" actually being a front for coal producers - the name does not really mean anything. The Chinese government is not a Communist state - no country actually is, or ever was. Oh, and it's also not a Republic either.

Let's see. The Chinese government calls themselves 'Communist'. Virtually the rest of the world calls them 'Communist'.

One anonymous person on AI says they're not.

Hmmmmm. Who to believe?
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post #79 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by elroth View Post

This wasn't even funny when "I Love Lucy" did it - overused, repetitive stereotyping is just not funny.


*Facepalm*
post #80 of 99
Time to quickly register a few trademarks sounding like names of cats.
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