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Best Buy mimicking Apple stores in retail makeover

post #1 of 123
Thread Starter 
In an effort to turn around its declining sales, Best Buy is testing new, smaller stores that borrow numerous elements from Apple's highly successful retail chain.

Best Buy has one prototype store in Richfield, Minn., which has a "Solution Central" table staffed by its Geek Squad employees that looks akin to Apple's Genius Bars according to The Wall Street Journal. The test store also offers customers the ability to pay for products at several locations rather than in checkout lines, much like Apple does.

Best Buy is attempting to shake things up after its stock has fallen 33 percent over the last two years, and sales at its stores have declined nearly 2 percent in each of the last two years.

The retailer's interim chief executive, Mike Mikan, has called the experimental, Apple-like store "Best Buy 2.0." The new focus is on ensuring customers can speak with employees who assist them, rather than displaying as many gadgets as possible.

The goal is that improved service can give the retailer an advantage over online electronics sellers like Amazon, which typically feature lower prices. Best Buy and other retailers are attempting to curb a trend known as "showrooming," where customers will visit a brick-and-mortar location to check out a product in person, but ultimately make their final purchase on the Internet.

Best Buy
Best Buy's new "Solution Central" has been compared to Apple's Genius Bars. Photo via The Wall Street Journal.


The company announced in March that it plans to close 50 stores and cut $800 million in costs as low margins on mobile computing devices have negatively affected its bottom line. After the closings, Best Buy will still have about 1,050 stores left in the U.S., and 60 of those are scheduled to be converted to the new "2.0" look with 20 percent less floor space.

The retailer is also planning to have 40 percent of its current workers undergo extensive training in September. New hires at Best Buy will also receive 80 hours of training in an effort to improve service.

Though Apple operates its own retail stores, Best Buy is an important partner for the iPhone maker. One recent survey found that Best Buy sells nearly as many iPhones in America as Apple does through its own direct sales.

Many Best Buy stores also feature dedicated Apple sections that feature products like the iPad, Macs and the Apple TV. That "store within a store" concept is found at over 600 Best Buy locations in America.
post #2 of 123

Perhaps their employees should spend less time snooping for porn on customers' hard drives and peddling various protection plans, and focus more on quality customer service and support.

post #3 of 123

It's getting pretty insane how massive a divide there is now between the looks of Apple and a lot of other businesses. Apple looks current while other companies look straight out of 20 years ago.

post #4 of 123
I'm sorry, you said mimicking, so I'm confused how this…

369

…is mimicking. Beyond the fact that it's a bar (1) and there are screens behind it (2). They certainly won't be mimicking any other aspects of what make Apple the leader in customer service.

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post #5 of 123

The biggest problem with Best Buy is that they have so many products on display but most of them don't work.  Most phones are fake cases, many laptops are locked behind the cages.  TV's with remotes hidden away.  Microwaves with no power.

 

It's funny that many Apple haters complains about Apple products are only skin deep, yet rest of the industry don't let consumers tryout their products before they buy.

post #6 of 123
Improved Service, wow that's a thought. You mean there might be someone whose purpose is to be helpful rather than sell me overpriced HDMI cables and Geek Squad services?

Now how about using your Market power to get crapware off of your PCs, rather than charging users via Geek Squad to delete the crapware.

Consumer friendly service, who would of thought that idea might be important one day? /s
post #7 of 123

Alright, so who *isn't* desperately trying to follow Apple's every move?

 

Every damn time. It takes Apple to light the way forward. 

post #8 of 123

Please. I had professional 'connections' to those who made the stores over nearly a decade ago. Because Best Buy only cared about saving a penny here, a penny there, the stores became the convoluted messes they are now.

 

Nothing will save Best Buy from eventual doom.

post #9 of 123

Lose the ties 

post #10 of 123

That prototype store looks like it's located in Utah, and staffed by elders. 

post #11 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by winstein2010 View Post

The biggest problem with Best Buy is that they have so many products on display but most of them don't work.  Most phones are fake cases, many laptops are locked behind the cages.  TV's with remotes hidden away.  Microwaves with no power.

 

It's funny that many Apple haters complains about Apple products are only skin deep, yet rest of the industry don't let consumers tryout their products before they buy.

You hit the nail on the head.  Best Buy and others know full well that most people wouldn't buy the Apple knock off phones if they had the opportunity to try them out first.  A few months ago I was at the Best Buy looking at the Android hero phone of the month and of course it was just a non-working display model and they had no working models to show.  

post #12 of 123

Best Buy should mimic Amazon's internet business. It is easy to order online. Repackaging and returning an item online is more time consuming. Knowing that an item can be returned to a physical store would be Best Buy's advantage.

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post #13 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I'm sorry, you said mimicking, so I'm confused how this…
369
…is mimicking. Beyond the fact that it's a bar (1) and there are screens behind it (2). They certainly won't be mimicking any other aspects of what make Apple the leader in customer service.

Yeah, they may be trying to mimick. But they have failed and really, that is the only picture you have to prove your point, AI?

 

 


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post #14 of 123

It's a pharmacy.  Everything is over the counter, and you have to pay the staff to let you consult you on your products before you can touch it.

 

Tech products really need to be sold by the manufacturers unless they can sell themselves.  Companies spend good money on R&D to make their best products only to be screwed up by the folks at FS or BB.  What a shame.  How many times have you gone in to check out products after a bit of on-line research, only to be told to just get "the big one" or the "expensive one"?  Not that the sales staff are the only culprits here, I hate the fact that the manufacturers circumvent their stupidity by flooding the market with 94 different kinds of modems or cameras, simulating "choice" but really making themselves look like they really didn't do proper market research.

 

Ah yes, and then there's my point.  The shopping industry and experience needs to change because the on-line/in-store experience is still rather fragmented.  Only then will I actually enjoy pulling out my wallet and hitting the stores.

post #15 of 123

BestBuy have started a car rental service? And yeah, sure, it can be compared to the Apple Genius Bar... it has a counter, right? So yeah, quite similar.

post #16 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The goal is that improved service can give the retailer an advantage over online electronics sellers like Amazon, which typically feature lower prices. Best Buy and other retailers are attempting to curb a trend known as "showrooming," where customers will visit a brick-and-mortar location to check out a product in person, but ultimately make their final purchase on the Internet.

Consumers don't often buy TVs or home appliances over the Internet. About the only product I have purchased at Best Buy is a TV. Smaller less fragile consumer electronics are better suited for online sales. I am surprised how many iPhones they sell, at least according to the article. I would have thought more phones would be purchased at the phone stores than BB.

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post #17 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmsley View Post

Tech products really need to be sold by the manufacturers unless they can sell themselves.

Or in the case of Apple where both is true.

post #18 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by markbyrn View Post

You hit the nail on the head.  Best Buy and others know full well that most people wouldn't buy the Apple knock off phones if they had the opportunity to try them out first.  A few months ago I was at the Best Buy looking at the Android hero phone of the month and of course it was just a non-working display model and they had no working models to show.  

I'm sorry, but you just can't make "a silk purse out of a sows ear"

post #19 of 123
Well I hope the stores States side are better than the ones we had here in UK, I thought their prices we reall on par or more expensive than with many other stores tbh.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-15616445

Mark
post #20 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by city View Post

Best Buy should mimic Amazon's internet business. It is easy to order online. Repackaging and returning an item online is more time consuming. Knowing that an item can be returned to a physical store would be Best Buy's advantage.

Interesting that you bring up Amazon.  There has been some analyst-babble about Amazon acquiring Best Buy, since Best Buy is becoming a mere showroom

for people to check out items before ordering from Amazon.

post #21 of 123
Walked in and out of a Best Buy the other day.

Upon leaving, I commented that it felt like I had just visited a Radio Shack.

I really wasn't gonna purchase anything, and the employees really didn't care I was there.

Too much inventory of crap that no one care about (CD's / DVD's / toys / refrigerators) and all the non-Apple displays were dirty or non-functional.

No soul. No direction.

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post #22 of 123

That pic just cries out for conversation bubbles, or captioning, or something...

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post #23 of 123

There are many things Best Buy is doing wrong in their stores, I'll just name a few things they need to improve.

 

Customer service is the obvious one.  They may have an army of employees to assist you at every waking moment, but they are just sales people.  They know nothing more than what's written on the package.  And, sometimes they don't even know that...they have to actually look and read the specs on the packages or on the computers...something you as a consumer could do on your own.  Selling electronics requires more training than selling clothes or other non-technical products.  Usually if you have a question beyond the box spec's they have to get one of the more technically trained guys.  In most departments of Best Buy, that's one or two people, who don't work every day and are usually barraged by other customers because they actually know something about what their selling.  Hiring and TRAINING more tech-savvy employees would be very helpful.

 

Building on the idea of better training, they could further promote the in-home delivery, training and set-up.  Not many electronics companies will offer that.  Apple does a great job with the One-On-One and the training classes.  That's one of the best reasons to buy Apple, they will train you to use their stuff.  They are a brick and mortar store, why not take advantage of the fact that they have a living, breathing, people waiting to help you.  Even if you have to make appointments, that hasn't stopped people from coming back to Apple Stores.  Amazon, Walmart and the likes aren't going to go that extra step.

 

Get rid of the impulse items, or at the very least tone them down.  They are really wasting money and time by selling snacks and other impulse items in their stores.  Just silly.  Focus on the products that people are there for.

 

Get rid of the bargain-basement items and sell Mid-range and High-end products.  If you want a cheap-ass TV, go to Walmart.  Why bother competing with Amazon and Walmart when they obvious beat you every time.  cheap products have no profit.  Use Consumer Electronics websites and 3rd party reviews (Consumer Reports, CNET) as your source for stocking products.  Heck the grocery stores started showing the wine-point-scale next to popular wines as a marketing solution to selling more wine.  Why not do that for electronics?

 

Include a free shipping option for products on IN-STORE.  I like the idea of floating check-outs like Apple Stores, but take that further by allowing a free method of delivery if they don't have it.  The Customer spent money on gas and time coming into your store for a product, so if you don't have it, offer a free shipping for out-of-stock items and market it that way.  BB has the volume to justify the cost.

 

Don't call it "Solution Central".  The "Geek Squad" name has been pretty successful, just build on your existing marketing structure....like "Geek Squad Station" or something.

 

One of the strong points to BB is their massive selection of different products/models.  They also sell an butt-load of accessories.  In most cases, the accessories out-shelf the actual products.  I'd be curious to see the numbers for % of sales on Accessories vs. actual products.  Seems like they could cut some margins if what I think is too many accessories.

 

Drop the furniture lines...keep the wall mounts and things of that nature.  but to sell office chairs and crap desks and entertainment cabinets is just wasteful...and the products are crap at best.  Target, Walmart and Ikea do much better business at that, so don't try and beat them in a market they obvious do much better in.

 

Look what Barnes & Noble has done in the past year or so.  They made the conscious decision to slowly phase-out all non-essential products and focus on selling BOOKS.  They are a book retailer, so they decided not to compete with Amazon and the likes and just focus on what they do best.  They dropped music and movies almost entirely.  Some stores still have them, but listening to insiders...I've heard that they will drop a lot of the non-essential stuff.

 

There are many more ways to improve, but that's my 2 cents.


Edited by antkm1 - 7/5/12 at 10:06am
post #24 of 123

Maybe if they wouldn't nickel and dime every customer and upsell the hell out of them, they wouldn't be where they are today. I hate BestBuy...I only go in there to look at something, try it and then buy it elsewhere (usually online). 

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post #25 of 123

Nothing can save Best Buy. 

post #26 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post

That prototype store looks like it's located in Utah, and staffed by elders. 

no, staffed by well scrubbed missionaries ... Willie Robme would be proud!

post #27 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

There are many things Best Buy is doing wrong in their stores, I'll just name a few things they need to improve.

 

Customer service is the obvious one.  They may have an army of employees to assist you at every waking moment, but they are just sales people.  They know nothing more than what's written on the package.  And, sometimes they don't even know that...they have to actually look and read the specs on the packages or on the computers...something you as a consumer could do on your own.  Selling electronics requires more training than selling clothes or other non-technical products.  Usually if you have a question beyond the box spec's they have to get one of the more technically trained guys.  In most departments of Best Buy, that's one or two people, who don't work every day and are usually barraged by other customers because they actually know something about what their selling.  Hiring and TRAINING more tech-savvy employees would be very helpful.

 

Get rid of the impulse items, or at the very least tone them down.  They are really wasting money and time by selling snacks and other impulse items in their stores.  Just silly.  Focus on the products that people are there for.

 

Get rid of the bargain-basement items and sell Mid-range and High-end products.  If you want a cheap-ass TV, go to Walmart.  Why bother competing with Amazon and Walmart when they obvious beat you every time.  cheap products have no profit.  Use Consumer Electronics websites and 3rd party reviews (Consumer Reports, CNET) as your source for stocking products.  Heck the grocery stores started showing the wine-point-scale next to popular wines as a marketing solution to selling more wine.  Why not do that for electronics?

 

Include a free shipping option for products on IN-STORE.  I like the idea of floating check-outs like Apple Stores, but take that further by allowing a free method of delivery if they don't have it.  The Customer spent money on gas and time coming into your store for a product, so if you don't have it, offer a free shipping for out-of-stock items and market it that way.  BB has the volume to justify the cost.

 

Don't call it "Solution Central".  The "Geek Squad" name has been pretty successful, just build on your existing marketing structure....like "Geek Squad Station" or something.

 

One of the strong points to BB is their massive selection of different products/models.  They also sell an butt-load of accessories.  In most cases, the accessories out-shelf the actual products.  I'd be curious to see the numbers for % of sales on Accessories vs. actual products.  Seems like they could cut some margins if what I think is too many accessories.

 

Drop the furniture lines...keep the wall mounts and things of that nature.  but to sell office chairs and crap desks and entertainment cabinets is just wasteful...and the products are crap at best.  Target, Walmart and Ikea do much better business at that, so don't try and beat them in a market they obvious do much better in.

 

Look what Barnes & Noble has done in the past year or so.  They made the conscious decision to slowly phase-out all non-essential products and focus on selling BOOKS.  They are a book retailer, so they decided not to compete with Amazon and the likes and just focus on what they do best.  They dropped music and movies almost entirely.  Some stores still have them, but listening to insiders...I've heard that they will drop a lot of the non-essential stuff.

 

There are many more ways to improve, but that's my 2 cents.

good points but they're getting squeezed in both directions - competition and customers - a real pain in the a

post #28 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Consumers don't often buy TVs or home appliances over the Internet. About the only product I have purchased at Best Buy is a TV. Smaller less fragile consumer electronics are better suited for online sales. I am surprised how many iPhones they sell, at least according to the article. I would have thought more phones would be purchased at the phone stores than BB.

I bought my 2nd to last iPhone from BB.  That was because my dad gave me a BB gift card for my birthday and the 3GS was $50.  So it was free for me.  Otherwise the Gift card might have gone to waste or to buy a movie i'll get bored of in 2 years time.

post #29 of 123

Best Buy sells and offers far too much junk. When you walk around the store and see what's on the shelves, you notice that they have no standards at all. They'll accept any product it seems, which is probably why there are so many junky and cheap Android devices there. And most of them don't even work.

 

I also caught one of their employees lying to me once. She said that they didn't have any iPad 2's in stock when I asked. This happened a while ago, around the time that the iPad 2 first got released. I don't trust any people working in Best Buy stores and people who make a few dollars an hour, so later on that same day, I asked another Best Buy employee in that same store who checked the computer, and I provided them with the exact model number and full product code from their website, and sure enough, they had some in stock. The girl saw what was happening and she frantically ran over to the computer and desperately tried to change the screen as quickly as possible, because she didn't want me to see their stock information, which revealed how she had been caught in a lie.

post #30 of 123

The thing that BB can't fix easily is store size.  The majority of their stores are oversized and even the scaled down versions are bigger than they need to be - for one reason.  They were created at a point where people were still buying cd's, dvd's, pc software, etc., at the store.  They only legacy thing they have going for them is video games, but even there it's more a collection of a handful of titles that is driving any significant volume.

 

If you pull out all those racks of unused or underused space, what can you fill it with?  Toys, seasonal things, food - that's crap for making a store look good.

 

Here's an idea - Best Buy should talk with Target about taking over their entire electronics section in all their (Target) stores.  It's a great solution to paring down the offering and you might actually be able to have trained staff working the department.  Size wise, there are more Targets than BB's now, but my guess is that BB would become more profitable doing it this way compared to what they're doing now.  BB would get greater market penetration and a customer base that typically shops once a week and would at least provide more eyes on the product than the typical BB shopper who goes in only when they need something.

 

Now how do I make money from an idea like this - that's the real question.

post #31 of 123
I love the ideas for Best Buy except for one problem and that is that they make sense. Things aren't allowed to make sense in big business : P
post #32 of 123
why every corp trying to copy Apple little by little
post #33 of 123
They could've named it the "Geek Bar", but they'd probably get sued.

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post #34 of 123

At least in the Bay Area but you could always check out at various registers through out store not just the main ones.

 

Whether someone is actually staffing it is another issue but hardly something new for best buy.

post #35 of 123
While I am not defending Best Buy, I believe there are a few notable considerations:

1. Best Buy (and Radio Shack) serve a definite need that isn't otherwise fulfilled in many areas of the United States. In many areas, the "Best Buy Guy" is the techspert. (Yes, sad, I know but this is the truth).
2. Best Buy (and Radio Shack) are national chains with very powerful brand awareness (ignoring repercussions of brand loyalty and brand value for now)
3. Best Buy had a minimal loss of 2% YoY two years in a row and is trying to "shake things up" which suggests Best Buy understands their business model is jeopardized and they may, if they don't take action, become another Circuit City, Good Guys, McDuffs and dozens of other electronics chains. This is good because they have time to experiment which may lead to improved products and services.

In my opinion, if Best Buy can do a few things they can succeed where virtually all other national electronics chains have failed:

1. Get more experts, real experts in the stores. People with at least two years of college in computer sciences and related fields and pay them well. A few weeks ago I was in the Best Buy and asked which laptops were "Ivy Bridge." I was referred to three different people none of whom knew of what I spoke including the "go-to guy." Only one person bothered to even ask what Ivy Bridge is (he deserves a small promotion simply for asking). The "go-to guy" wouldn't even admit he didn't know what Ivy Bridge is.
2. Shift your model to keep up with the times. See points 3 - 8 below.
3. Online presence. check (could be improved though).
4. Don't just sell products, sell services ... Consider offering a cross platform ecosystem (Amazon Prime competitor) ... Consider "Apps As A Service" such as 1Password, Dropbox and Evernote ... Create more brand value ... Sell Apps regardless of the platform so that your customers don't buy Apple or Samsung ... they buy the Apps ... from Best Buy. Many people aren't buying a brand, they are buying what the product can do. Show them, don't tell them what a product can do. Bring those "can dos" in-house.
5. Look to competitors to see what works (not just Apple). For example, Steam, Gamefly, Netflix. Take a loss to get them into the stores for advice, the hardware and service contracts.
6. Smaller, more intimate stores. in progress.
7. Weed out products that don't sell. hmmm... Perhaps focus on electronics ... No refrigerators, etc. In the content areas (apps, books, movies, music), heavily promote online sells.
8. Offer free classes (and offer advanced classes at some cost) or offer a "One-on-One" type program.
post #36 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by nixbsd View Post

why every corp trying to copy Apple little by little

Copy what works. Look at Zynga...

post #37 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

There are many things Best Buy is doing wrong in their stores, I'll just name a few things they need to improve.

Customer service is the obvious one.  They may have an army of employees to assist you at every waking moment, but they are just sales people.  They know nothing more than what's written on the package.  And, sometimes they don't even know that...they have to actually look and read the specs on the packages or on the computers...something you as a consumer could do on your own.  Selling electronics requires more training than selling clothes or other non-technical products.  Usually if you have a question beyond the box spec's they have to get one of the more technically trained guys.  In most departments of Best Buy, that's one or two people, who don't work every day and are usually barraged by other customers because they actually know something about what their selling.  Hiring and TRAINING more tech-savvy employees would be very helpful.

Building on the idea of better training, they could further promote the in-home delivery, training and set-up.  Not many electronics companies will offer that.  Apple does a great job with the One-On-One and the training classes.  That's one of the best reasons to buy Apple, they will train you to use their stuff.  They are a brick and mortar store, why not take advantage of the fact that they have a living, breathing, people waiting to help you.  Even if you have to make appointments, that hasn't stopped people from coming back to Apple Stores.  Amazon, Walmart and the likes aren't going to go that extra step.

Get rid of the impulse items, or at the very least tone them down.  They are really wasting money and time by selling snacks and other impulse items in their stores.  Just silly.  Focus on the products that people are there for.

Get rid of the bargain-basement items and sell Mid-range and High-end products.  If you want a cheap-ass TV, go to Walmart.  Why bother competing with Amazon and Walmart when they obvious beat you every time.  cheap products have no profit.  Use Consumer Electronics websites and 3rd party reviews (Consumer Reports, CNET) as your source for stocking products.  Heck the grocery stores started showing the wine-point-scale next to popular wines as a marketing solution to selling more wine.  Why not do that for electronics?

Include a free shipping option for products on IN-STORE.  I like the idea of floating check-outs like Apple Stores, but take that further by allowing a free method of delivery if they don't have it.  The Customer spent money on gas and time coming into your store for a product, so if you don't have it, offer a free shipping for out-of-stock items and market it that way.  BB has the volume to justify the cost.

Don't call it "Solution Central".  The "Geek Squad" name has been pretty successful, just build on your existing marketing structure....like "Geek Squad Station" or something.

One of the strong points to BB is their massive selection of different products/models.  They also sell an butt-load of accessories.  In most cases, the accessories out-shelf the actual products.  I'd be curious to see the numbers for % of sales on Accessories vs. actual products.  Seems like they could cut some margins if what I think is too many accessories.

Drop the furniture lines...keep the wall mounts and things of that nature.  but to sell office chairs and crap desks and entertainment cabinets is just wasteful...and the products are crap at best.  Target, Walmart and Ikea do much better business at that, so don't try and beat them in a market they obvious do much better in.

Look what Barnes & Noble has done in the past year or so.  They made the conscious decision to slowly phase-out all non-essential products and focus on selling BOOKS.  They are a book retailer, so they decided not to compete with Amazon and the likes and just focus on what they do best.  They dropped music and movies almost entirely.  Some stores still have them, but listening to insiders...I've heard that they will drop a lot of the non-essential stuff.

There are many more ways to improve, but that's my 2 cents.

I usually block your posts but someone else quoted you. I give credit where it is due. Nice post. In fact, I read this after I posted my comments and it looks like a copied you on several points.
post #38 of 123

The sale of retail cd's and dvd's is going to continue to decline and as that happens it will only highlight the cavernous space that Best Buys contain. Best Buy would be better off shrinking their store size and focusing on having everything on display work than adding a huge customer service bar. I mean really, who doesn't buy at Best Buy because they can't get their questions answered?

 

Why people buy at Best Buy?

 

Price

Convenience

Availability

 

If I were Best Buy, I would leverage their online ability as much as possible to be able to compete with Amazon. Just like Circuit City, Best Buy's days are numbered unless they do something drastic to turn things around and a customer service bar is not the answer. Just more clutter and confusion for the customer.

post #39 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post


I usually block your posts but someone else quoted you. I give credit where it is due. Nice post. In fact, I read this after I posted my comments and it looks like a copied you on several points.

uh, thanks?  I'll take that as a compliment.

post #40 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmsley View Post

It's a pharmacy.  Everything is over the counter, and you have to pay the staff to let you consult you on your products before you can touch it.

The shopping industry and experience needs to change because the on-line/in-store experience is still rather fragmented.  Only then will I actually enjoy pulling out my wallet and hitting the stores.

Putting everything behind locked glass and having those lame paper photocopies of the product that you have to bring to a store employee is obviously a loss prevention measure. It's also why everything is encased in ultrasonically welded plastic that's nearly impossible to cut through without a bolt cutter. How many times have you gone to Best Buy and the alarm was going off because somebody tugged on the security cord of the display model too hard?

And of course, everytme you talk to those store employees they try to up sell you on extended warranties. Are you sure you want to decline? It's just $129 for two years, starting today, not two years after your factory warranty expires, which means you're double paying for the first year. You wouldn't want <insert horror story about dust in your optical drive> to happen!

I used to visit Best Buy weekly, just to shop around, and now I don't even bother. Yes, iTunes music store has replaced any reason to shop there for music, and Amazon, despite the lack of "right now" satisfaction does a pretty good job at getting things at a competitive price to your doorstep, and you know whether it's in stock when you click Purchase. I haven't set foot in Best Buy in years.

Of course, Apple Stores are still terrific places to go, but I only go when I have a question or want to buy something.

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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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