or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Best Buy mimicking Apple stores in retail makeover
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Best Buy mimicking Apple stores in retail makeover - Page 2

post #41 of 123
aside from their other faults, the reason i will never purchase another product from best buy is their idiotic requirement that you give them your first born just to return a product. well, not your first born, but your id, which they then store in a mysterious 3rd-party database over which they have no control and which their affiliates have access to. i'll shop at best buy, but it'll be an especially cold day in pinckney, mi, before best buy ever sees a penny of mine.
post #42 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Of course, Apple Stores are still terrific places to go, but I only go when I have a question or want to buy something.

Seriously? Who do you ask in Apple Stores for help? I have found that most of the Apple Store employees aren't that knowledgeable. They know about Apple products and services but they don't even know much more than the better people at Best Buy. Go to the local Apple Store and ask a random associate the MTTF of the Time Capsule (or at least the hard drive and power supply). I am not including the Geniuses but as far as I know, Geniuses don't walk the floor.

I have had unsatisfactory experiences with the Apple Store app assistance queue. As in no one showed up after 20 minutes in a nearly empty store.

The Apple Store at the Westfield Valley Fair Mall in Santa Clara is horribly crowded all the time. Apple is now trying to fix such problems with the older stores. Many retailers ignore their stores until sales are in grave jeopardy, nice to see Apple being proactive.

Don't get me wrong, Apple Stores are still head and shoulders above virtually every other retailer.
Edited by MacBook Pro - 7/5/12 at 11:18am
post #43 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Alright, so who *isn't* desperately trying to follow Apple's every move?

Every damn time. It takes Apple to light the way forward. 

Well you can't argue with success. The entire tech industry is looking at Apple to see how it's supposed to be done. And with AAPL now worth more than twice MSFT who can disagree? Well, of course, the haters and trolls will always disagree but at this point they are looking like jealous fools, pathetic specters.
post #44 of 123

It actually starts from the moment you walk in the store. At BB they have someone standing at a desk checking receipts as you walk out of the store with their back to the entrance, the same guy says hi to you as you walk in. So immediately you know that security person is watching you.

 

Contrast this to the Apple store. They have some guy standing facing you, welcoming you to the store. Nobody checks your receipt when you walk out.

 

I'm not a criminal, I shouldn't be treated like one.

post #45 of 123

That picture makes Best Buy look more like a Greyhound terminal than an Apple Store.

"Picasso had a saying, 'Good artists copy, great artists steal.' And we've always been shameless about stealing great ideas."
Reply
"Picasso had a saying, 'Good artists copy, great artists steal.' And we've always been shameless about stealing great ideas."
Reply
post #46 of 123

I've been to this Best Buy store and it's much better than their other stores.  Only think I didn't care about was the dedicated Samsung display areas. :lol:

post #47 of 123

I highly doubt a different "look" will help BestBuy stores.

 

The reason I don't go into those stores anymore is because most of the staff barely knows anything about the products. The last time I went into BestBuy was to find a car stereo/bluetooth hands-free solution for my iPhone. I had done one evening's worth of research before walking into BestBuy, and realized that I already knew more about iPhone compatible car stereos than the two "experts" in their car stereo department. 

 

Generally, I do research online and then order from Amazon. The product gets to my home in 1-2 days.  

post #48 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by city View Post

Best Buy should mimic Amazon's internet business. It is easy to order online. Repackaging and returning an item online is more time consuming. Knowing that an item can be returned to a physical store would be Best Buy's advantage.

 

Those are excellent points.  Further, BB could allow you to order on the Internet and offer incentives for in-store pickup -- discount coupons, service plans, etc.  

 

That way BB would:

-- gain the advantages of online sales

-- avoid/reduce shipping costs

-- potentially reduce in-store inventory

-- attract customers into the store for additional purchases

 

This way BB could nearly match Amazon prices and offer services that Amazon cannot match.

"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #49 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by winstein2010 View Post

The biggest problem with Best Buy is that they have so many products on display but most of them don't work.  Most phones are fake cases, many laptops are locked behind the cages.  TV's with remotes hidden away.  Microwaves with no power.

 

It's funny that many Apple haters complains about Apple products are only skin deep, yet rest of the industry don't let consumers tryout their products before they buy.


I noticed the same thing, except that Apple display products are on, always working, always available for trying out.  Of all the smartphones in their store only the iPhone and Nokia Lumia were available for trying out. Every Android phone was a nonworking phone with a picture of the UI stuck on the plastic screen.

post #50 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

This way BB could nearly match Amazon prices and offer services that Amazon cannot match.

 

Amazon still has one significant advantage, and I believe that's why many people still order from Amazon. They don't pay any tax in most states. In my state, Amazon charges me tax now, they didn't a few years ago, but I believe that most places still do not charge tax for Amazon. I'm not sure about the legality of it, and eventually I believe that everybody will get charged tax, but for now, Amazon has that advantage. 

 

Not paying any tax is like getting a significant discount on everything you order, especially if the prices are reasonable to begin with.

post #51 of 123
All right, that's way too much of this nonsense.
post #52 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Or in the case of Apple where both is true.

 

You have to wonder why anyone has allegiances to any store with more than 1 brand.  One-stop shop?  I don't know anyone who buys everything at one location because it is convenient.

post #53 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmsley View Post

You have to wonder why anyone has allegiances to any store with more than 1 brand.  One-stop shop?  I don't know anyone who buys everything at one location because it is convenient.

???

You don't know anyone who shops at department stores or supermarkets?
post #54 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by JupiterOne View Post


  I mean, what other explanation could there be since you obviously are such a good looking guy, right?

Not to mention patient, non-judgmental, not outspoken, opinionated or having entitlement issues. And don't forget he's white too. That should count for something.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #55 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by markbyrn View Post

Lose the ties 

As a Geek Squad employee, I couldn't agree more!

post #56 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by winstein2010 View Post

The biggest problem with Best Buy is that they have so many products on display but most of them don't work.  Most phones are fake cases, many laptops are locked behind the cages.  TV's with remotes hidden away.  Microwaves with no power.

While that may be part of the issue, it's not universal. My city has two Best Buy stores. One is the way you describe it and the other is well stocked with almost everything working all the time. From my experience when traveling, I think the latter is more of the issue.

The biggest problem Best Buy faces is that they too often serve as a showroom for online purchasers. People come in, look around, take up the salesperson's time, and then go buy the product online from the cheapest source. Best Buy needs to find a way around that. The genius bars being discussed is one option. Just a few:

- Do what this article suggests and create a buying environment like Apple's. A place where people can get answers and get problems resolved. If done properly, this will reduce the revenue of their Geek Squad (simple answers would be free, but the Geek Squad would still be available to come to your home and set up your entire system), but would more than make up for the lost revenue in customer loyalty.
- Find a way to tie customers to Best Buy. Their reward zone program seems to have helped, but not enough. I haven't followed it and don't know if it became less generous or just became old. But they have to reward and recognize loyal customers. I'm not sure what would work, but this could be as simple as a coffee bar for preferred customers or something more complicated.
- They have to find a way to get around the 'showroom' nature of their stores. Finding more unique products that are not available online would be a start. Go to some smaller vendors of unique products and arrange a deal where Best Buy will put the products in all of their stores in exchange for an exclusive sales arrangement. That is essentially one of the things that Walmart did in the early years.
- Think way outside of the box. Heck, charge admission to their stores if you don't buy anything. (obviously not a serious suggestion).
- Making the stores more appealing as you suggest would help, but I don't think it would have much impact by itself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by city View Post

Best Buy should mimic Amazon's internet business. It is easy to order online. Repackaging and returning an item online is more time consuming. Knowing that an item can be returned to a physical store would be Best Buy's advantage.

You can already do that at Best Buy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by quinney View Post

Interesting that you bring up Amazon.  There has been some analyst-babble about Amazon acquiring Best Buy, since Best Buy is becoming a mere showroom for people to check out items before ordering from Amazon.

There would be some interesting synergies to that. However, there would be some strong negatives, as well.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #57 of 123

Best Buy has basically turned into a showroom for online retailers such as Amazon. I think the biggest issues with Best Buy is their staff aren't very knowledgeable about the products they sell. Most products on display not counting TV's either are turned off or don't work. Their pricing is high, especially when it comes to things like blu ray discs, CD's, cables, etc. You can buy a good quality HDMI cable on Amazon for under $5. At Best Buy, I don't see anything under $20. Another big factor is you have to pay sales tax at Best Buy. Buying expensive electronics online that don't charge sales tax saves you a decent amount of money. I know that doesn't apply to everyone though. Another negative thing about Best Buy is I hate the fact when you purchase an item, the workers always are pushy in getting you to purchase warranty. Best Buy needs to ditch the wasted space where they sell snacks, drinks, and candy. Best Buy needs to make online shopping a better experience and offer more. They should copy how Amazon does things. It's simple to return and their customer service is excellent. The same can't be said for Best Buy. 

post #58 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post


???
You don't know anyone who shops at department stores or supermarkets?

I mean to say, I don't know anyone who only goes to some department store for ALL their needs ONLY.  It is possible to shop at one place because everything IS cheaper, like groceries, (I do in fact) but that's because I know what I want, they have it, and I don't have questions.  I wouldn't however, refrain from buying food somewhere and feel bad for splitting my loyalties.  Hey would you buy ethernet cable only from Apple?

post #59 of 123

If Apple does release it own HDTV, it might consider buying BestBuy and essentially choke off one of the major distribution channels for competing consumer electronic products, while instantly more than doubling its own distribution capacity. It will only cost them  $7B, and converting them to Apple Stores will be easier if BB is starting to emulate them.
 

post #60 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boltsfan17 View Post

Buying expensive electronics online that don't charge sales tax saves you a decent amount of money. 

That is a whole 'nother topic. Eventually they are going to make you pay the tax. Amazon is fighting it but they will eventually have to comply, even if it is just for California. The deal they currently have ends September 2012.

 

As a business we have to declare the purchases and pay the sales tax even though Amazon doesn't charge any.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #61 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmsley View Post

I mean to say, I don't know anyone who only goes to some department store for ALL their needs ONLY.  It is possible to shop at one place because everything IS cheaper, like groceries, (I do in fact) but that's because I know what I want, they have it, and I don't have questions.  I wouldn't however, refrain from buying food somewhere and feel bad for splitting my loyalties.  Hey would you buy ethernet cable only from Apple?

My point is that department stores have largely superseded specialty retail stores much like supermarkets have largely superseded bakers and butchers. People accept department stores and supermarkets because those are the norm now but that hasn't always been true.

Apple doesn't sell ethernet cables as far as I know, otherwise I might.
post #62 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post


Apple doesn't sell ethernet cables as far as I know, otherwise I might.

store.apple.com/us/browse/home/shop_mac/mac_accessories/cables

 

They sell Belkin 7' Cat6

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #63 of 123
Two words: Nerd Herd!

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #64 of 123
Just by looking at the picture it's obvious it isn't going to work. Best Buy doesn't "get it". And the white shirts with black ties make those guys look like douchebags.
post #65 of 123

Is it me...or does it look ugly and clunky? 2 stools....just looks clumsy.

post #66 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by sportyguy209 View Post

The sale of retail cd's and dvd's is going to continue to decline and as that happens it will only highlight the cavernous space that Best Buys contain. Best Buy would be better off shrinking their store size and focusing on having everything on display work than adding a huge customer service bar. I mean really, who doesn't buy at Best Buy because they can't get their questions answered?

 

Why people buy at Best Buy?

 

Price

Convenience

Availability

 

If I were Best Buy, I would leverage their online ability as much as possible to be able to compete with Amazon. Just like Circuit City, Best Buy's days are numbered unless they do something drastic to turn things around and a customer service bar is not the answer. Just more clutter and confusion for the customer.

 

Ya' know... you reminded me of when we owned computer stores in Silicon Valley (1978-89).  There was a period of time when it seemed as if there was a [competitor's] computer store on every corner... all offering: 

 

Price

Convenience

Availability

 
As it turns out, they were mainly offering discounts -- and computers began to be sold as commodity items.
 
The way we competed was by offering some things the others could/would not.
 
Basically, we guaranteed satisfaction and did everything within our power to make the customer a competent computer user.   It was successful and generated repeat customers and many, many reference sales (nationwide and world wide).
 
First, we sold the "products" (hardware and software) at full retail prices -- but explained to the customers we would earn every penny -- that they would get much more in service and support (which we itemized),  We were able to refer them to satisfied customers who would back this up.
 
Second, all our employees were salaried -- and any vendor SPIFFS were shared equally among all employees (sales, service, admin).  We promoted the attitude to our employees that the customer was a customer of our company -- and was not Larry's or Cathy's customer...  This reaped benefits in satisfied customers (and all that it means) -- you completely avoided the situation where a customer wants help, but staff refuses to wait on him because he is Candy's customer.
 
Third, we established the best service/repair/installation department in the state (country?).  I can remember one day there was a line at our repair pickup counter.  In the line were Regis McKenna (himself), Mike "Scottie" Scott (former president of Apple) and John Sculley's AA (our customer's were the "who's who" of computer users").  We also promoted our repair service to our staff and customers as: this is the ultimate situation to turn around a dissatisfied customer (his computer doesn't work) into a satisfied customer.  
 
Fourth. we offered exclusive training -- from initial setup and checkout (getting the customer comfortable with his purchase); weekly "Tips and Techniques" classes for follow-on training; specialty classes: database, desktop publishing, etc.  Most of this training was developed by our [non-comissioned] sales staff -- who used customer interests and problem feedback as a basis for the training.  Often, we would feature people with specialized abilities or talents... Bill Atkinson, Andy Hertzfeld, Woz, Mike Kinney, Guy Kawasaki...  About 1/5 of our floor space was a "multipurpose room" with comfortable [expensive] Herman Miller couches, chairs and tables.  This could be easily reconfigured for a single checkout, formal "hands on" class, lecture, etc.
 
The results of all this was that we were able to survive and prosper through the bad times when the competitors were going out of business.
 
There may be some things that BB could implement.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #67 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post

If Apple does release it own HDTV, it might consider buying BestBuy and essentially choke off one of the major distribution channels for competing consumer electronic products, while instantly more than doubling its own distribution capacity. It will only cost them  $7B, and converting them to Apple Stores will be easier if BB is starting to emulate them.
 

Wow...that does spark the imagination. Imagine Apple going store by store and revamping it into an Apple store bit by bit. Wouldn't that be an ironic turn of events....you walk in and the main floor is all Apple and tucked back in the corner is MS/PC's! :)

 

Probably not going to happen, but nevertheless one of the most original ideas I've seen on these boards in years!  Good show!:)

post #68 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpokorny View Post

It actually starts from the moment you walk in the store. At BB they have someone standing at a desk checking receipts as you walk out of the store with their back to the entrance, the same guy says hi to you as you walk in. So immediately you know that security person is watching you.

 

Contrast this to the Apple store. They have some guy standing facing you, welcoming you to the store. Nobody checks your receipt when you walk out.

 

I'm not a criminal, I shouldn't be treated like one.

 

Actually, Apple Stores have security people on site -- they are dressed like customers.  

"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #69 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by sportyguy209 View Post

The sale of retail cd's and dvd's is going to continue to decline and as that happens it will only highlight the cavernous space that Best Buys contain. Best Buy would be better off shrinking their store size and focusing on having everything on display work than adding a huge customer service bar. I mean really, who doesn't buy at Best Buy because they can't get their questions answered?

 

Why people buy at Best Buy?

 

Price

Convenience

Availability

 

If I were Best Buy, I would leverage their online ability as much as possible to be able to compete with Amazon. Just like Circuit City, Best Buy's days are numbered unless they do something drastic to turn things around and a customer service bar is not the answer. Just more clutter and confusion for the customer.

Agreed, BB is an ice cube. Like RIM, Nokia and Sony

post #70 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by AeronPrometheus View Post

That picture makes Best Buy look more like a Greyhound terminal than an Apple Store.

Very good...I couldn't put my finger on it...I just knew it was god awful! :)

post #71 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

 

Amazon still has one significant advantage, and I believe that's why many people still order from Amazon. They don't pay any tax in most states. In my state, Amazon charges me tax now, they didn't a few years ago, but I believe that most places still do not charge tax for Amazon. I'm not sure about the legality of it, and eventually I believe that everybody will get charged tax, but for now, Amazon has that advantage. 

 

Not paying any tax is like getting a significant discount on everything you order, especially if the prices are reasonable to begin with.

 

That is true.

 

I think that this is going to change rapidly, though.  I suspect within a few years Amazon (and other web retailers) will start charging taxes for any state in which they do business -- that means any state to which they sell/ship something.

"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #72 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post

That prototype store looks like it's located in Utah, and staffed by elders. 

Brilliant that was my first thought, too...I just couldn't figure out a nice way to say it. :)

 

As someone said above, lose the ties.

 

Maybe teal t-shirts? :)

post #73 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Haha, that's pure baloney. I'm not homophobic at all. That person was a bigot and also sexist. Are you one of those people who claims that a gay person can not be a bigot? Or that a minority can not be a racist?

You don't understand.  She is a member of a protected class and you are not.  She counts, you don't.  I, too, am a while male and am at least told I am handsome, especially given my age.  I know the type you mean, and they don't belong on a sales floor, regardless their orientation.

A big heart is commendable, an enlarged heart is a medical condition.
Reply
A big heart is commendable, an enlarged heart is a medical condition.
Reply
post #74 of 123

I just read all the posts from the start and this board sounds so reminiscent of the conversations just before the demise of Circuit City, CompUSA, and Blockbuster.

 

Like I said above, BB is an ice cube.

post #75 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

 

That is true.

 

I think that this is going to change rapidly, though.  I suspect within a few years Amazon (and other web retailers) will start charging taxes for any state in which they do business -- that means any state to which they sell/ship something.

Then Amazon will be at a slight disadvantage because they also have to charge for shipping where as when you buy locally you just pick up the merchandise yourself. It probably will level the playing field a bit because warehouses are typically less expensive than retail space. I think they should charge the tax but it is complicated because for example in California every single city, county, and zip code charges their own tax rate and when you submit your sales tax it all has to be itemized for each district. Multiply that by all the other states and you have a lot of added accounting to deal with not to mention the added website functionality. There are lots of reasons why Amazon doesn't want to charge sales tax but mainly it just makes them less competitive.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #76 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpokorny View Post

It actually starts from the moment you walk in the store. At BB they have someone standing at a desk checking receipts as you walk out of the store with their back to the entrance, the same guy says hi to you as you walk in. So immediately you know that security person is watching you.

 

Contrast this to the Apple store. They have some guy standing facing you, welcoming you to the store. Nobody checks your receipt when you walk out.

 

I'm not a criminal, I shouldn't be treated like one.

Beast Buys are often located in some pretty dodgy parts of town, or they get a lot of bus and light-rail customers.  Take that to mean whatever you want.  Apple stores are generally in good areas, in well-kept malls with good security.

A big heart is commendable, an enlarged heart is a medical condition.
Reply
A big heart is commendable, an enlarged heart is a medical condition.
Reply
post #77 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by AeronPrometheus View Post

That picture makes Best Buy look more like a Greyhound terminal than an Apple Store.

Ok this made me LOL.  Fantastic post.

post #78 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

 

Ya' know... you reminded me of when we owned computer stores in Silicon Valley (1978-89). 

 

 

Just an FYI to everyone: Pay attention when this man posts. Computer Plus of Sunnydale was THE place.

 

Thank you, Dick, for being there in the early days and for everything you've done for the Macintosh community.

post #79 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Apple 
[" url="/t/151107/best-buy-mimicking-apple-stores-in-retail-makeover/40#post_2141011"]
Amazon still has one significant advantage, and I believe that's why many people still order from Amazon. They don't pay any tax in most states. In my state, Amazon charges me tax now, they didn't a few years ago, but I believe that most places still do not charge tax for Amazon. I'm not sure about the legality of it, and eventually I believe that everybody will get charged tax, but for now, Amazon has that advantage. 

Not paying any tax is like getting a significant discount on everything you order, especially if the prices are reasonable to begin with.

Yes - and it's good that we don't forget that.

Fortunately, there is finally a serious effort to require internet retailers to pay sales tax. For the sake of local retailers, I hope it happens soon.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #80 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


Yes, iTunes music store has replaced any reason to shop there for music, and Amazon, despite the lack of "right now" satisfaction does a pretty good job at getting things at a competitive price to your doorstep, and you know whether it's in stock when you click Purchase. I haven't set foot in Best Buy in years.
Of course, Apple Stores are still terrific places to go, but I only go when I have a question or want to buy something.

iTunes is a terrible replacement to purchasing CDs, seeing as the music they sell runs at 256kbps.

 

Gross.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Best Buy mimicking Apple stores in retail makeover