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Apple sued for allegedly infringing Chinese Siri-like patent - Page 2

post #41 of 54

You know the world's gone to hell when a company from The Land of the Biggest Intellectual Property Thieves on the Planet tries to sue one of the world's most innovative entities.

 

This is as pathetic as K-pop groups stealing entire melodies from western boy bands, but somehow worse.

post #42 of 54

.

post #43 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by peter236 View Post

It looks like the Chinese are way ahead of Apple in developing Siri-like technology.

Please say you were being sarcastic.

post #44 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattBookAir View Post

Another day, another jingoistic thread, at AppleInsider.

You're actually likening AppleInsider to a platform for extreme nationalist propaganda, like The People's Daily (or Fox News if you prefer)? That's... amusing. 

post #45 of 54

This is not like Proview, which was a loser for Apple from the start because of a basic mistake made by Apple's proxies in securing the rights to the iPad name. Proview's case (whether premeditated or not) simply exploited that mistake.

 

The new suit is very different -- the problem isn't the technical merits of the case, which obviously favor Siri and her origins. The problem is the Chinese legal system, and the fact that the central government's reach is not as great as one might think. Where will the case be heard? Apple has plenty of leverage in Beijing -- but that kind of influence can work against you elsewhere in China. Orders from on high don't always sit well with the local powers-that-be. Nonetheless, Apple will fight this one to the end, with the full support of the international tech industry. This case is far more threatening than Proview's little scam, on multiple levels.

post #46 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by peter236 View Post

 

Did you read the article properly? That Chinese company got their voice-recognizing assistant patent in 2006. It was likely that Apple copied from the Chinese.

The reading skills of Americans are so low that no wonder they have to copy foreign technologies.

That one made me laugh so hard I almost spilled my coffee.

 

Dude, the last time 'Americans' needed to copy anything significant from China was likely during the Tang Dynasty, with paper; but even the Egyptians beat you to the punch in that area. Sure, China brought the world some important medieval-level technology (as did the Romans and Greeks before them), but the difference between Chinese firecrackers and an American/German Saturn V is literally as great as the distance from the height of a Beijing rooftop to the Moon. 

 

Given enough time I'm sure Chinese 'revisionist' history will 'show the west' how - in fact - it was 'actually' Chinese physicists who discovered the Higgs Boson at a 'secret' facility outside Shanghai...in 1830. 

post #47 of 54

How someone manages to get a patent on voice command is beyond on me. The act of doing something should not be patentable.

post #48 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radar View Post
Dude, the last time 'Americans' needed to copy anything significant from China was likely during the Tang Dynasty, with paper...

 

Weirdly enough, the last major borrowing by the West from 'China' is its intellectual role in the 18th-century English Enlightenment, which led directly to the principles enshrined in the Constitution of the United States. Don't laugh -- this is not a joke. Martin Powers of the University of Michigan was at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton in 2009 working on a book about this -- I don't know how close he is to finishing it, but it is a serious historical argument. The irony, of course, is that China itself does not currently benefit from the fruit of its greatest contribution to the modern world -- in short, the democratic ideal.

post #49 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post

You think Apple copied from the Chinese?
The irony.
Do you have reading comprehension? It clearly says the Siri like (copied) UI was a recent addition.
I must lack reading comprehension.
I don't see where it says Siri like UI was a recent addition.
post #50 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellacool View Post

Ha Ha. Apple, pot meet kettle. Apples deep pockets mean zero in China and they are going to pay. This is a blatant rip off and now they are called on the carpet. If some po-dunk, going out of business company can sue over a name and get $60 million, this company is going to rape Apple. Brings a small tear knowing Apples karma is biting them. The final thing Steve Jobs left Apple, crap karma. You can be the most successful person in the world but if you are a walking jerk, karma will get you, and it did and now it is biting again.

Umm...really classy, dude. I suspect life in general will bitch slap you...hard.
post #51 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenThousandThings View Post

 

Weirdly enough, the last major borrowing by the West from 'China' is its intellectual role in the 18th-century English Enlightenment, which led directly to the principles enshrined in the Constitution of the United States. Don't laugh -- this is not a joke. Martin Powers of the University of Michigan was at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton in 2009 working on a book about this -- I don't know how close he is to finishing it, but it is a serious historical argument. The irony, of course, is that China itself does not currently benefit from the fruit of its greatest contribution to the modern world -- in short, the democratic ideal.

Dude, I AM laughing. And you should be too. 

 

There are always some 'scholars' in the west fascinated enough by modern 'Chinese versions of history' to actually start believing this bunk themselves, but they usually wither under serious peer review. Case in point Gavin Menzies' book 1421:The Year China Discovered America, hyped upon publication as The Word then quickly dispatched to the realm of Chariots of the Gods under historical and archeological analysis. Even if it had been true, the Vikings landed in and settled L'Anse aux Meadows around 998 AD, certainly predating Columbus but also the Chinese 'revisionist' version of 'their' discovery of North America by at least four centuries. And we won't even get into the Basques.

 

The same will hold true for the 'scholarly work' you reference above. There's a reason why China has not a single Nobel science laureate who wasn't educated in the west, they are taught (or 'persuaded') not to question authority, especially the official party line on politics, history and China's 'great achievements'. Remember, China is the country that continues to back North Korea, itself another 'Workers' Paradise' where lakes cracked and skies wept when Dear Leader died last year. Don't laugh, you say? You couldn't write this stuff.

post #52 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radar View Post

Dude, I AM laughing. And you should be too. There are always some 'scholars' in the west fascinated enough by modern 'Chinese versions of history' to actually start believing this bunk themselves, but they usually wither under serious peer review. Case in point Gavin Menzies' book 1421:The Year China Discovered America, hyped upon publication [...]

 

The same will hold true for the 'scholarly work' you reference above. There's a reason why China has not a single Nobel science laureate who wasn't educated in the west, they are taught (or 'persuaded') not to question authority, especially the official party line on politics, history and China's 'great achievements'. [...]

 

Menzies' book had no peer review (serious or otherwise) -- it was and is basically a joke to anyone with training in the field, something he lacks entirely. Martin Powers is a whole 'nother kettle of fish. The phenomenon I was talking about has nothing to do with science and technology -- it is about cultural and political practices and ideals, an area China was far ahead of the rest of the world starting around the 11th century. The Manchu invasion in the 17th century and more than two hundred years under their yoke ended China's role in science and technology, but thought and society is another matter. Your comment makes clear you don't know anything about this, which is fine, but don't pretend that China's lack of achievement in science and technology beyond the distant past mean that its culture as a whole is somehow insignificant in the shaping of the modern world. To say so is just foolish -- mistaking ignorance for certainty.


Edited by TenThousandThings - 7/8/12 at 9:30am
post #53 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by TenThousandThings View Post

 

Menzies' book had no peer review (serious or otherwise) -- it was and is basically a joke to anyone with training in the field, something he lacks entirely. Martin Powers is a whole 'nother kettle of fish. The phenomenon I was talking about has nothing to do with science and technology -- it is about cultural and political practices and ideals, an area China was far ahead of the rest of the world starting around the 11th century. The Manchu invasion in the 17th century and more than two hundred years under their yoke ended China's role in science and technology, but thought and society is another matter. Your comment makes clear you don't know anything about this, which is fine, but don't pretend that China's lack of achievement in science and technology beyond the distant past mean that its culture as a whole is somehow insignificant in the shaping of the modern world. To say so is just foolish -- mistaking ignorance for certainty.

Glad you agree yet you seem uncertain yourself as to what China's decisive, pivotal contribution to American democracy was/is. But you could have mentioned Native American contributions to institutions such as the constitution, which predated any possible by China even if your fantasy scenario were the case, which it's not. As for there being no peer review of Menzies I suggest you start with Gibson http://nabataea.net/1421.html

 

In your previous post you allude to (but fail to specify) China's 'invaluable contribution' to the 18th century English Enlightenment, then in your most recent you seem to desperately cite the relative 'enlightened' status of China during Europe's late Dark Ages (Celtic scholarship aside, it's not too difficult to look good compared to anyone's 'Dark Ages'). But this was period which followed by millennia the contributions of Greece and Rome to later European development—civilizations which were as far ahead of China in their times as America was/is in its. Arguably, the Mesopotamians, Egyptians, Sumerians, Inca, Khmer, and Indus Valley civilizations were also ahead of China in theirs; i.e. Chinese emissary Zhou Daguan being just as put in his place by the sophistication of Angkor Wat in the 13th century as his 20th century counterparts were by the airplane and radio. In other words, China's 'vast superiority' over all contemporaries throughout its entire history is a Chinese-created myth, and always has been. 

 

The Greeks (via the Moors) for example had far more impact on said European revival (note 'revival' or 'restoration', not 'emergence') than the Chinese, who remained (remain) hidebound by Confucianism not only in terms of scientific development but also in terms of conceptual, ideological and political development—hence why the only 'revolutions' in China were those of the "Cultural" variety circa 1966, the Boxer variety of 1900, or the more recent nationalistic versions of. China's current economic windfall does not stem from some genuine in-house Renaissance—scientific or philosophical—but from patent violations, stolen technology, western scientific R&D, and other economic ideas from the west—the pace of their incorporation into the 'Chinese Miracle 'accelerated by the sucker-punch combo of globalization, the Internet (hacking of western trade secrets, technology transfer agreements, etc.), and the the death-of-a-thousand-cuts meted out to foolish western CEOs blinded by the mirage of exclusive access to Chinese markets. The influence of the west on China has been massively positive for China's GNP, and massively negative for the west. Or do you actually assert that the Great Leap Forward is responsible for the ideas, culture, and products we in the west seem to like—rock music, iPods, social media, and freedom fries?

 

Your attempt to paint China as the reoccurring savior of the west is diametrically opposed to reality. In the final analysis China was merely one of many players that made a contribution to the medieval world, but it had no more (and actually far less) of an impact on Europe's development than ideas originating from the Americas, or going back in history India and the Fertile Crescent civilizations; but most crucially it was those ideas originating from within Europe itself (Greece, Rome, Italy, England, France, Norway) which proved the most influential.

 

While this was going on China continued to trudge along at medieval speed due to its own misguided sense of superiority while the west (and to a lesser extent Japan) invented the modern world. This is not a point for debate. Or, to put the massive gap in perspective there were more groundbreaking proofs and inventions in a single Boeing 747 than in all of Chinese technological history combined. What's more, I can't think of a single Chinese political idea that had any direct influence on me or the vast majority of western culture. Confucianism? Taoism? Maoism? I don't think so. Next you'll be telling us it was the Soviets who adapted Chinese Communism and not the other way around, or that the Free Tibet movement is itself a product of Chinese political philosophy 'no doubt' historically grounded in democratic values and a pursuit of human rights. 

 

Then again, none of this is exactly news, is it. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-18741088


Edited by Radar - 7/9/12 at 4:04am
post #54 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by peter236 View Post

 

Did you read the article properly? That Chinese company got their voice-recognizing assistant patent in 2006. It was likely that Apple copied from the Chinese.

The reading skills of Americans are so low that no wonder they have to copy foreign technologies.

 

Look here.... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fictional_computers

 

How many of those computers allowed a user to talk to them and get an answer??????  It is ALL prior art.  Heck, look at the tablets used in Star Trek: The Next Generation and see how similar they look to an iPad from the back or the idea of a tablet period.

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