or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Apple buying land for $304M expansion in Austin, Tex.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple buying land for $304M expansion in Austin, Tex.

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Plans for Apple's $304 million campus expansion in Austin, Tex., are now in motion, as the company recently bought three tracts of land in the city.

The purchase discovered by Austin Business Journal was finalized on June 20, though the exact acreage and the price remain unknown. The deal between Apple and McShane Development Co., LLC, was for three tracts of land in the Milwood Section 20 subdivision near Parmer Lane and Delcour Drive.

The land is adjacent to Apple's current campus in Austin, found at 12545 Riata Vista Circle. The iPhone maker plans to create 3,600 new jobs, doubling the size of its workforce in Texas with the $304 million expansion.

The company's functions in the region are primarily related to customer support, sales and accounting. The state of Texas plans to award Apple $21 million over 10 years through the Texas Enterprise Fund in return for the new jobs and economic stimulus.

The city of Austin has also approved an $8.6 million grant to Apple to expand its offices, while Travis County also granted Apple $5.4 million in tax rebates in return for minimum salary requirements. Apple has pledged an average salary of $35,000 for the bottom 10 percent of its own employees, as well as a minimum of $11-per-hour for contractors.

Apple Austin facility


The bulk of Apple's money will be invested in a $226 million 800,000-square-foot office located in North Austin. There, Apple will have a total of 3,665 new jobs created by 2025.

Local officials initially chose to be aggressive in courting Apple and offering incentives because the company was looking at other potential locations for the facility. It was said that Phoenix, Ariz., was another city Apple was considering.
post #2 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Plans for Apple's $304 million campus expansion in Austin, Tex., are now in motion, as the company recently bought three tracks of land in the city.

 

Do you mean tracts of land...?

post #3 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianfrick View Post

 

Do you mean tracts of land...?

 

Obligatory Python Quote:

 

"We live in a bloody swamp. We need all the land we can get." 
"But I don't like her."
"Don't like her? What's wrong with her? She's beautiful, she's rich, she's got huge... tracts of land."

 

Sorry - couldn't help it... :)

post #4 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveMcM76 View Post

 

"We live in a bloody swamp. We need all the land we can get." 
"But I don't like her."
"Don't like her? What's wrong with her? She's beautiful, she's rich, she's got huge... tracts of land."

 

Sorry - couldn't help it... :)

No apologies needed.  My thoughts exactly.

 

Huge!

post #5 of 27

3,600 more jobs. What are they all going to do? I think Apple is doing just fine as far as teams go. 

 

 


Tim Cook using Galaxy Tabs as frisbees

 

Reply

 

 


Tim Cook using Galaxy Tabs as frisbees

 

Reply
post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by logandigges View Post

3,600 more jobs. What are they all going to do? I think Apple is doing just fine as far as teams go. 

Seeing it's a support center, maybe support for as yet unannounced products? Expanded support staff for the existing products?

 

A 7" iPad has the potential to add a lot of customers so does an Apple TV (not to be confused with AppleTV).

 

 


Quote:
Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post

No apologies needed.  My thoughts exactly.

 

Huge!

Probably a lot of peoples thoughts... And yes, the same thought ran through my mind as well.

post #7 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianfrick View Post

 

Do you mean tracts of land...?

 

 

Spell checkers and editors have different jobs.  AI has only one of them. They need to keep better tract of these things. :)

post #8 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post

No apologies needed.  My thoughts exactly.

 

Huge!

 

 

It was the first thing that popped into my mind - even when I saw that Apple planned to buy "tracks" of land...

post #9 of 27
Sadly, the state of California would never give out incentives like that for businesses to expand and create new jobs. All they know how to do is tax businesses to death and encouraging them to flee the west coast.

Please update the AppleInsider app to function in landscape mode.

Reply

Please update the AppleInsider app to function in landscape mode.

Reply
post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveMcM76 View Post

Obligatory Python Quote:

"We live in a bloody swamp. We need all the land we can get." 


"But I don't like her."


"Don't like her? What's wrong with her? She's beautiful, she's rich, she's got huge... tracts of land."


Sorry - couldn't help it... 1smile.gif

My mind went to the same place.

"Siri, what's the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow?"

Siri - "About 25 mph for a European swallow."

I'da felt better if she asked me what type. I was looking for the African variety.
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Sadly, the state of California would never give out incentives like that for businesses to expand and create new jobs. All they know how to do is tax businesses to death and encouraging them to flee the west coast.

They could build a bullet train from Fresno to Bakersfield for a mere $8 billion. Makes sense...NOT! 

 

As long as we are intent on spending money on idealistic transportation projects why not spend the it on building a hydrogen refueling infrastructure and electric car charging outlets in the major metropolitan areas?

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

They could build a bullet train from Fresno to Bakersfield for a mere $8 billion. Makes sense...NOT! 

 

As long as we are intent on spending money on idealistic transportation projects why not spend the it on building a hydrogen refueling infrastructure and electric car charging outlets in the major metropolitan areas?

 

 

It might make sense to do both.  Keep in mind that the government subsidized highways might cost more per passenger mile than government subsidized mass transportation, however.

 

The US Interstate Highway System costs billions of dollars to build and maintain.  In general, it is free to use.  Trucking companies, while they pay taxes intended to offset some costs, are heavily subsidized by gaining access to the highways.

 

In general, trains cost less than trucks,  In general, trains cost less than airplanes, but take longer.  In general, trains should be subsidized to at least the level of the trucking companies and the airlines.  This might include government-built tracks, much like the government builds highways and airports.

 

I'm not confident on any of this, but it strikes me when people oppose subsidies for more efficient transportation while not examining subsidies for highway-dependent businesses.

post #13 of 27

Outside of Silicon Valley, Austin is easily the most technologically effluent city in the US.  Someday the rest of the population will realize that Texas isn't just a bunch of rednecks raising cattle and riding horses, and for that matter- that not all californians are hippies or gay.  But alas- what would the world be without stereotypes.  Moves like this make me happy and make Texas that more awesome (as if being top 5 cost of living index wasn't enough).  :-)

2014 27" Retina iMac i5, 2012 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air 2, iPad Mini 2, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

Reply

2014 27" Retina iMac i5, 2012 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air 2, iPad Mini 2, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

Reply
post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerrySwitched26 View Post

 

 

It might make sense to do both.  Keep in mind that the government subsidized highways might cost more per passenger mile than government subsidized mass transportation, however.

 

The US Interstate Highway System costs billions of dollars to build and maintain.  In general, it is free to use.  Trucking companies, while they pay taxes intended to offset some costs, are heavily subsidized by gaining access to the highways.

 

In general, trains cost less than trucks,  In general, trains cost less than airplanes, but take longer.  In general, trains should be subsidized to at least the level of the trucking companies and the airlines.  This might include government-built tracks, much like the government builds highways and airports.

 

I'm not confident on any of this, but it strikes me when people oppose subsidies for more efficient transportation while not examining subsidies for highway-dependent businesses.

Yes - and lets not forget the difference in the environmental impact of the construction and use of highways compared to railways. 

post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerrySwitched26 View Post

 

 

It might make sense to do both.  Keep in mind that the government subsidized highways might cost more per passenger mile than government subsidized mass transportation, however.

 

The US Interstate Highway System costs billions of dollars to build and maintain.  In general, it is free to use.  Trucking companies, while they pay taxes intended to offset some costs, are heavily subsidized by gaining access to the highways.

 

In general, trains cost less than trucks,  In general, trains cost less than airplanes, but take longer.  In general, trains should be subsidized to at least the level of the trucking companies and the airlines.  This might include government-built tracks, much like the government builds highways and airports.

 

I'm not confident on any of this, but it strikes me when people oppose subsidies for more efficient transportation while not examining subsidies for highway-dependent businesses.

The bill passed to build the train is for a passenger bullet train and has nothing to do with cargo. Have you ever been to Fresno or Bakersfield? I don't want to spend a dime out there. The population centers are on the coast.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #16 of 27

Highways are not free to use - gas taxes are 67 cents per gallon of gasoline & 75.9 cents for diesel in CA (as of 1/1/12).

http://www.api.org/statistics/fueltaxes/upload/gasoline-diesel-summary.pdf

 

Instead of building trains that do not go where people live, why not expand the bus routes. It's a lot easier to move a bus stop than to move a train station.

post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Sukalewski View Post

 

Instead of building trains that do not go where people live, why not expand the bus routes. It's a lot easier to move a bus stop than to move a train station.

Makes a lot of sense. I ride the bus everyday and it is standing room only. The bullet train is such an ill-conceived concept out in Bakersfield. It would be a great idea if it connected SF-LA-SD but there is no right of way to build it. They would have to use the same space the Amtrak and Metro link currently use and those services are pretty good already. Not super fast but definitely serviceable. The bus idea is a good one. We need people to start using mass transit for 5-10 mile trips instead of taking their car. People who own cars seem to never consider using mass transit for some reason.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The bulk of Apple's money will be invested in a $226 million 800,000-square-foot office located in North Austin.

 

Welcome to the daughtership.

post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Mozzarella View Post

 

Welcome to the daughtership.

 

 

 

Exactly my thoughts

post #20 of 27

When did Austin, TX become part of China? After all, Apple outsourced all its jobs to China (according to the media).

post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianfrick View Post

Do you mean tracts of land...?

As opposed to tracts of flaming hot magma.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

When did Austin, TX become part of China? After all, Apple outsourced all its jobs to China (according to the media).

It was part of the credit extension deal with China.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianfrick View Post

 

Do you mean tracts of land...?

 

Maybe they are referring to the new F1 track they are building in Austin? Vroom, vroom. Look at me, I'm racing around Apple's tracks of land.

post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Sadly, the state of California would never give out incentives like that for businesses to expand and create new jobs. All they know how to do is tax businesses to death and encouraging them to flee the west coast.

 

Well, Warren Buffet thinks CA has the right idea - and wants to apply to it all Americans.  And he's a billlionaire.  So he must be right...

 

In other news, Denise Richards, famous wife of famous pardoned tax cheat who was a famous Clinton supporter announces renouncing her citizenship because the US is a "tax hell."

Quote:
Originally Posted by JerrySwitched26 View Post

 

 

It might make sense to do both.  Keep in mind that the government subsidized highways might cost more per passenger mile than government subsidized mass transportation, however.

 

The US Interstate Highway System costs billions of dollars to build and maintain.  In general, it is free to use.  Trucking companies, while they pay taxes intended to offset some costs, are heavily subsidized by gaining access to the highways.

 

In general, trains cost less than trucks,  In general, trains cost less than airplanes, but take longer.  In general, trains should be subsidized to at least the level of the trucking companies and the airlines.  This might include government-built tracks, much like the government builds highways and airports.

 

I'm not confident on any of this, but it strikes me when people oppose subsidies for more efficient transportation while not examining subsidies for highway-dependent businesses.

 

Anyone who thinks that getting around on a fixed, limited schedule mass transit (and getting to the station and then somewhere from the station) is "efficient" in most parts of the country ('tho it makes sense in super-dense Manhattan, where you can also get within blocks of most places, e.g., and operate at least on a reduced schedule 24/7) is thinking only of pie in the sky green goodness.  The "Light Rail" link put in along Utah's Wasatch population access is quiet, fast, comfortable, reasonably priced, has Wi-Fi, AND quits running at 11:00, doesn't run on Sundays - and is being expanded even as studies show it's so underutilized it costs much more in $/mile AND energy consumed/per passenger mile than driving a single passenger average car.  Not including the system's capitalization costs.  Nor our gradual surrender of sovereignty through total governmental indebtedness.

And games may be played, but gas taxes - at all levels - were designed to be used to support highways - as a user pay as you go fee - some of which actually gets diverted into mass transit subsidies. 

An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

Reply

An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

Reply
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Sukalewski View Post

Highways are not free to use - gas taxes are 67 cents per gallon of gasoline & 75.9 cents for diesel in CA (as of 1/1/12).

http://www.api.org/statistics/fueltaxes/upload/gasoline-diesel-summary.pdf

 

Instead of building trains that do not go where people live, why not expand the bus routes. It's a lot easier to move a bus stop than to move a train station.

 

Bus routes sound good too.    You  can ride a bus from Boston to NYC for well under $20.

 

But buses are slow.

post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

They could build a bullet train from Fresno to Bakersfield for a mere $8 billion. Makes sense...NOT! 

As long as we are intent on spending money on idealistic transportation projects why not spend the it on building a hydrogen refueling infrastructure and electric car charging outlets in the major metropolitan areas?

People like you said the same things before BART was built, and now it can be impossible to find a seat on it.
San Francisco is the second densest city in North America. The LA metro area is the second densest in the country. The bullet train will link city center to city center. Airports link suburbs to suburbs, with up to an hour extra commute time from the airport to reach the city center.
The initial link in the central valley is less contested with lawsuits and special engineering and that is why it will be built first. While that is being built, the technicalities of the urban areas will be worked out and then construction can commence after the central valley links are built. Makes sense to me.

And the comments about California being a bad place for business are comical, seeing as how it is home to the largest corporation in the world and the center of the digital world economy.
You guys need to turn off F news and get out more.
Edited by tyler82 - 7/18/12 at 9:18pm
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

..., Austin is easily the most technologically effluent city in the US. ...

When I think of effluents, Texas immediately comes to mind, yes.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Apple buying land for $304M expansion in Austin, Tex.