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Made in America: Apple's supply chain increasing US production

post #1 of 38
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Over the last year, some of Apple's key component suppliers have begun increasing their U.S.-based production, which could be a sign that more of the iPhone is already made in America than one might think.

When Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook was recently asked at the D10 conference about the possibility of his company building products in America, he noted that some crucial parts for the iPhone and iPad are already manufactured stateside. Specifically, he identified the ARM processors built by Samsung in Austin, Texas, or the Corning Gorilla Glass made in Kentucky.

But the iPhone and iPad — Apple's two most popular products — are made up of much more than the CPU and glass that Cook highlighted. These complex mobile machines include power controllers, proximity sensors, cellular radios, Wi-Fi chips, audio and video chips, accelerometers and more — and a number of those parts come from American companies.

Of course, there's no guarantee that any of the parts found in Apple's products are, with absolute certainty, made in America, even if they're sold by a U.S. company. Many chipmakers build their products at a number factories located around the world. And ever-secretive Apple doesn't even disclose who makes many of the parts found in its products, leaving enthusiasts to tear the company's devices apart and hunt for clues, sometimes to no avail.

But over the last year, some of the more prominent chipmakers that Apple does business with, including Texas Instruments and Avago Technologies, have begun to increase their stateside production of components.

One industry contact who spoke with AppleInsider said that many of these companies are expanding their U.S. production in part because of orders received from "a large personal electronics manufacturer" that continues to see record breaking sales. Afraid to identify Apple by name, some in the industry are said to jokingly refer to growing orders from a mysterious "fruit vendor."

A5 3


Expanding production

One Apple supplier, Avago Technologies, is currently expanding its manufacturing processes in Fort Collins, Colo., and is planning to buy as much as $130 million worth of manufacturing equipment. Avago is responsible for making a custom part for Apple's iPhone 4S that allows one handset model to connect to multiple forms of wireless networks around the world, according to IHS iSuppli.

AppleInsider inquired with Avago about its U.S.-based chip fabrication, as well as its assumed partnership with Apple, but the company declined to comment.

Texas Instruments, another key Apple partner, is also currently ramping up production at its Texas chip fabrication factories. While the chipmaker is closing factories in Japan and Houston, one person familiar with the company's operations said those moves have come as the company turns its focus to products seeing increased demand.

In particular, Texas Instruments is said to have seen orders grow considerably for its power management chips for mobile devices like smartphones. Texas Instruments already supplies a number of components to Apple, including the touchscreen controller in the iPhone 4S, as well as power management chips and a control device found in the new third-generation iPad. The company was also rumored in March to have begun manufacturing new power management chips for Apple's next iPhone.

A person familiar with operations at Texas Instruments said its power control chip business, which is said to receive a significant number of orders from Apple, has generated "thousands of jobs" in the U.S. Many of those jobs are said to be high-paying technical jobs that require employees with engineering degrees, particularly at its Richardson, Tex., facility, known internally as "RFAB."

Texas Instruments
The Texas Instruments fabrication facility in Richardson, Tex., opened in 2009.


A spokesperson for Texas Instruments told AppleInsider their company doesn't comment on matters related to "potential customers," and declined to discuss the company's general chip fabrication business.

Fairchild Semiconductor, which is believed to supply power supply chips for Apple's iOS devices, is also said to be producing over capacity at its American facilities. The San Jose-based company, which has been around in various forms since 1957, saw record quarterly sales for mobile products in the first quarter of 2012, and is in the process of adding more equipment in the U.S.

An individual familiar with Fairchild's business indicated to AppleInsider that the company's 200-millimeter wafer fabrication plant in South Portland, Maine, is currently at full capacity, as is its 150-millimeter facility in West Jordan, Utah. This person said Apple-ordered components built by Fairchild will primarily come from its Maine plant in the second half of 2012.

Fairchild
Fairchild Semicondutor plant in South Portland, Maine, via Maine Ahead.


AppleInsider reached out to representatives from Fairchild Semiconductor multiple times over the last week and a half, but the company failed to respond to any inquiries.

There are also rumors in the industry that Maxim Integrated Products, a semiconductor manufacturer based in San Jose, has secured orders from Apple. The company has plants in San Antonio and Dallas, as well as Beaverton, Ore., and San Jose, Calif.

AppleInsider reached out to Maxim to comment on rumors that it has received orders from Apple, but the chipmaker declined to comment on that particular topic.

However, Vivek Jain, senior vice president of Manufacturing Operations at Maxim, did discuss his company's general chip production business, and revealed that about 50 percent of its wafer fabrication production is based in the U.S.

Maxim recently began a multi-year investment in its American facilities, upgrading and expanding capacity at all of its U.S. fabrication plants. Jain said the investment will allow Maxim to improve product quality and upgrade its equipment while assimilating production from recently acquired companies. Maxim's 380,000-square-foot semiconductor fab in San Antonio was purchased from Philips Semiconductors Inc. in 2003.

Jain said the companies Maxim partners with have not specifically asked the chipmaker to build more products in the U.S. But Maxim has focused on its American operations regardless, because the company feels it gives them a competitive advantage.

"We have a very talented pool of resources in Silicon Valley and across (the) U.S. to develop new process technologies and do cost effective manufacturing, while protecting critical intellectual property," Jain said.

Maxim
Maxim Integrated Products is spending $65 million to expand its chip fab facility in San Antonio, Tex.


Maxim has 9,300 employees worldwide, and about 1,000 of those are manufacturing cleanroom workers at its four U.S. fabs, which produce integrated circuits for smartphones, tablets and more.

Combined, Maxim's plants in San Antonio and Beaverton employ nearly 1,100 manufacturing and engineering staff. Even more high-end workers are expected to be added as the company continues its $200 million in upgrades aimed at expanding its U.S. semiconductor manufacturing facilities.

Breaking down the iPhone's parts

It's impossible to tell exactly how much of Apple's products are truly built in the U.S. As evidence of this, Andrew Rassweiler, senior principal analyst at research firm IHS iSuppli, put together a breakdown of components found in the iPhone 4S, and 52.6 percent of the parts were considered "unknown."

iSuppli's research did find that Samsung Semiconductor, which builds Apple's custom ARM processors in Texas, plays the biggest role in the iPhone 4S. They estimate that Samsung's components represent 12.4 percent of the smartphone's identifiable bill of materials.

Avago Technologies is estimated to account for 1 percent of the bill of materials in the iPhone 4S, while Texas Instruments is pegged at 0.6 percent, Maxim is estimated to account for 0.5 percent, and Fairchild Semiconductor has 0.1 percent.

Corning's Gorilla Glass, which serves as the scratch-resistant surface for the iPhone 4S touchscreen and is publicly acknowledged to be made in America, is estimated by iSuppli to represent another 0.6 percent of the smartphone's total bill of materials.

Other noteworthy iPhone component makers on iSuppli's list are:
  • Qualcomm, based on San Diego, Calif., and estimated to account for 8 percent of the bill of materials
  • Amperex Technology, with 3.2 percent and headquartered in Brooklyn, New York
  • TriQuint Semiconductor, of Beaverton, Oregon, with 1.1 percent of the iPhone 4S cost
  • Cirrus Logic, from Austin, Tex., is estimated by iSuppli to take 0.6 percent.
  • Skyworks Solutions is headquartered in Woburn, Mass., and accounts for 0.5 percent of the iPhone 4S cost
  • AKM Semiconductor is a subsidiary of Japan's Asahi Kasei Microdevices, but it is headquartered in San Jose, Calif., and represents 0.3 percent of the bill of materials
  • Peregrine Semiconductor, of San Diego, is estimated at 0.3 percent
  • RF Micro Devices accounts for an estimated 0.2 percent of the iPhone cost, and is based out of Greensboro, N.C.
  • ON Semiconductor, of Phoenix, Ariz., accounts for the smallest identifiable share of the iPhone 4S, with less than 0.1 percent

iSuppli


Domestic assembly less likely

While a number of parts found in the iPhone, iPad and other Apple products come from American companies and are made in the U.S., those parts are still shipped to China where Apple's assembly partner, Foxconn, puts together the final product. Cook noted at D10 that much of the media scrutiny regarding Apple's overseas partnerships comes from an "intense focus on the final assembly."

"Could that (assembly) be done in the U.S.? I sure hope so," Cook said. "But look, how many tool-and-die makers do you know in America? I could ask them, nationwide, to come here tonight and we couldn't fill this room."

It's also worthwhile to consider that assembly jobs with companies like Foxconn tend to be low paying positions, which is in part why so many Chinese workers take on large amounts of overtime for extra pay. In contrast, the engineering jobs required for chip fabrication at companies like TI, Avago, Fairchild and Maxim are highly skilled, more desirable positions.

"We do as many of these things [in America] as we can do," Cook said at D10. "And you can bet that we'll use the whole of our influence to do this."
post #2 of 38

It is good to see AI do some original research an to publish an original story.

post #3 of 38

First of all, very cool article.

 

Getting to the "assembled by Foxconn in China" part. I remember Cook talking about how the current iPhones were/are designed to be put together by human hands. This is purposely done so that it can be put together by cheap labor (in China). Saying that, wouldn't it be possible to redesign the phone (and other gear) to be assembled by more advanced methods (aka robots)? We've pretty much have done this with cars, appliances, etc and it has both kept those companies in business and (more importantly) profitable. Granted with cars there's still a lot of physical labor involved, but it's shocking how much of it is automated! I watch too much "How it's made" haha Just a thought...

post #4 of 38

I am not an USA citizen, but this is good news.

 

I despise the Microsoft and Google bizStrategy, it is for lazy firms like DELL and HP …

Any company can take on Apple, now with Microsoft and Google bizStrategy, going for more market share with licensing-spree it is difficult to create an Apple or Microsoft or Google-like firm from scratch.

post #5 of 38

I would just like to reduce the double standard of Apple receiving nearly all media scrutiny for its overseas production, whereas other US-based tech companies have the same or worse practices, and show no inclination to change them.

 

Surprising to see Texas Instruments on this list. Are they still making the same models of graphing calculators, for the same retail price, since 1994?

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

of course they are.

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post #6 of 38

if you ship iphones direct from China, then i guess it makes sense to ship parts back to china from the US to make new iphones. otherwise the 747's are flying back empty or with a lot of empty space

 

and did oblama pass some new tax break allowing manufacturing in the US?

post #7 of 38
Great article AI! Thanks for the good read! As much as I complain about the forum software, credit is due for this article.
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post #8 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vorsos View Post

I would just like to reduce the double standard of Apple receiving nearly all media scrutiny for its overseas production, whereas other US-based tech companies have the same or worse practices, and show no inclination to change them.

 

Surprising to see Texas Instruments on this list. Are they still making the same models of graphing calculators, for the same retail price, since 1994?

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

of course they are.

especially given that, prior to apple, corporations never even considered worker rights overseas. apple implemented the first-ever policy for worker rights in factories. but apple is the one that gets the flack for either not taking care of everyone or outsourcing jobs.

 

hell, i won't be surprised if there are some people who will say it's not good enough.

 

apparently, all society's woes can be attributed to apple.

post #9 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

if you ship iphones direct from China, then i guess it makes sense to ship parts back to china from the US to make new iphones. otherwise the 747's are flying back empty or with a lot of empty space

 

and did oblama pass some new tax break allowing manufacturing in the US?

 

 

There is no need.

Loot at Ireland, low tax but High unemployment.

post #10 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ochyming View Post

 

 

There is no need.

Loot at Ireland, low tax but High unemployment.

 

And well educated. I'm surprised more companies aren't pouring into Ireland, to the chagrin of the Brits next door who complain about the taxes they're not getting (NOT the JOBS!).

post #11 of 38
I hope this article cues people in on how extremely unlikely it will ever be to get all parts of any CE to be completely made and assembled in the US.

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post #12 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by UltraSPARC View Post

First of all, very cool article.

 

Getting to the "assembled by Foxconn in China" part. I remember Cook talking about how the current iPhones were/are designed to be put together by human hands. This is purposely done so that it can be put together by cheap labor (in China). Saying that, wouldn't it be possible to redesign the phone (and other gear) to be assembled by more advanced methods (aka robots)? We've pretty much have done this with cars, appliances, etc and it has both kept those companies in business and (more importantly) profitable. Granted with cars there's still a lot of physical labor involved, but it's shocking how much of it is automated! I watch too much "How it's made" haha Just a thought...

 I'm only guessing but I think it might actually be cheaper to use human assembly compared to robotic assembly. It makes sense in the car/appliance industry where one model will have a multi-year production run, but not for a product you only plan to make for one year or less. Retooling an entire facility with custom machinery is quite costly and has little to no flexibility. With Apple's current Foxconn set up, the workers could work on iPhone assembly one day and the next work on iPads. It's a very organic structure that can react very quickly to changing supply/demand constraints. If Apple only had a set number of custom built automated fab machines, they could only do one thing at the same pace regardless of supply/demand constraints.

 

And that's all before considering the moral element of those 100,000+ assembly workers and where they would presumably go? Back to the rural farms they came from making less than nothing.

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post #13 of 38

This is the part which most people fail to understand and have failed to understand for years as this article has shown. There is lots of things still made in the US. But everyone wants to focus on the labor part which went over seas, Do we want to be a country of low paying labor or High salary tech jobs and services. And those who are complaining about these labor jobs going over seas are unwilling to sit at a bench 8+ hours a day doing the same thing over and over again at any price. You could offer to pay these people $20/hr and they still will not do it.

post #14 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I hope this article cues people in on how extremely unlikely it will ever be to get all parts of any CE to be completely made and assembled in the US.

The engineering and chip fab jobs are higher skilled, higher paying than final assembly, no?

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post #15 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

One industry contact who spoke with AppleInsider said that many of these companies are expanding their U.S. production in part because of orders received from "a large personal electronics manufacturer" that continues to see record breaking sales. Afraid to identify Apple by name, some in the industry are said to jokingly refer to growing orders from a mysterious "fruit vendor."

 

Who knew Dole needed to purchase massive quantities of semiconductors?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

if you ship iphones direct from China, then i guess it makes sense to ship parts back to china from the US to make new iphones. otherwise the 747's are flying back empty or with a lot of empty space

 

Apple doesn't own the cargo planes.  I'm sure FedEx ships plenty of stuff into China as well as out.

post #16 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I hope this article cues people in on how extremely unlikely it will ever be to get all parts of any CE to be completely made and assembled in the US.

This is the key point.

 

Btw, terrific article, AI! Nice research. And, stuff like this has no interest whatsoever for our resident trolls.

post #17 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


The engineering and chip fab jobs are higher skilled, higher paying than final assembly, no?

True, but I don't think he's talking about assembly. I think his point is broader: there is no way that the many other higher value added parts in the component supply chain required to make the iPhone -- and other similar CE products -- ever be replicated in the US. There'll be a few, here and there, but the overall contribution to the product's value added (other than for Apple's own internal value added) will likely be low.

post #18 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

This is the part which most people fail to understand and have failed to understand for years as this article has shown. There is lots of things still made in the US. But everyone wants to focus on the labor part which went over seas, Do we want to be a country of low paying labor or High salary tech jobs and services. And those who are complaining about these labor jobs going over seas are unwilling to sit at a bench 8+ hours a day doing the same thing over and over again at any price. You could offer to pay these people $20/hr and they still will not do it.

 

We need both, skilled and unskilled jobs.  While it might be nice if everybody could have a high-paying high-tech job, the fact is that large amounts of the population either can't or don't want that kind of job.  It would be better for these people to have factories to work in than for them to be unemployed.

 

I don't believe the myth of jobs Americans won't take.  If the pay is fair, there are plenty of people who will take the job.

 

I was recently in Phoenix, AZ, where they have recently imposed very strict laws to ensure that illegals don't work.  You know what happened?  The work is still getting done, but now English speaking Americans (including plenty of Hispanics - who are in the US legally) are doing the work.  Maybe the employers have had to start paying better wages than what they were paying the illegals, but that's not a bad thing.

post #19 of 38

"It's impossible to tell exactly how much of Apple's products are truly built in the U.S. As evidence of this, Andrew Rassweiler, senior principal analyst at research firm IHS iSuppli, put together a breakdown of components found in the iPhone 4S, and 52.6 percent of the parts were considered "unknown."

iSuppli's research did find that Samsung Semiconductor, which builds Apple's custom ARM processors in Texas, plays the biggest role in the iPhone 4S. They estimate that Samsung's components represent 12.4 percent of the smartphone's identifiable bill of materials."

 

 

Sorry this is a math fail for this wording.  They are 12.4% of the total, but the known portion is only 47.4%, so Samsung makes up 26.16% of the known components.  It should either say that Samsung's components represent 12.4% of the iPhone's bill of materials or mention the 52.6% unknown and add that Samsung makes up 26.16% of what is known.

 

post #20 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukevaxhacker View Post

 

And well educated. I'm surprised more companies aren't pouring into Ireland, to the chagrin of the Brits next door who complain about the taxes they're not getting (NOT the JOBS!).

About 15 years ago many high tech companies were moving into Ireland.  I don't know what has happened since then.  Maybe they discovered that they really don't speak english LOL.

post #21 of 38

GlobalFoundries and IBM have invested > $4.5 Billion in Upstate New York for the Malta Fab. Kind of dwarfs these announcements.
 

post #22 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by shamino View Post

We need both, skilled and unskilled jobs.  While it might be nice if everybody could have a high-paying high-tech job, the fact is that large amounts of the population either can't or don't want that kind of job.  It would be better for these people to have factories to work in than for them to be unemployed.
Many people don't get this, some simply don't want the stress and responsibility that goes with higher paid jobs. Ive seen this first hand in manufacturing in the US where you get a very negative reaction when you tell a person they can do more, move up the ladder or whatever. In some cases they are far more interested in being in front of a machine for 8 hours and not having to think all that hard.
Quote:
I don't believe the myth of jobs Americans won't take.  If the pay is fair, there are plenty of people who will take the job.
For the most prt this is true. There are however those with a liberal mind set that think they are entitled to the job they were trained for or went to college for. I've atually seen marriages ruined over this mindset, in one case a guy laid off from the banking industry insisted on another banking job while his wife worked to support the family. Sadly ones level of education doesn't indicate their level of stupidity.

Hopefully these people are in the minority, for the most part Americans will take jobs where wages are competitive.
Quote:
I was recently in Phoenix, AZ, where they have recently imposed very strict laws to ensure that illegals don't work.  You know what happened?  The work is still getting done, but now English speaking Americans (including plenty of Hispanics - who are in the US legally) are doing the work.  Maybe the employers have had to start paying better wages than what they were paying the illegals, but that's not a bad thing.

Isn't it funny that Obama is supporting slave labor rates right in this country by not enforcing immigration laws? It is pretty pathetic that those that support illegal immigration do so for the most part for their own selfish interests.
post #23 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjwal View Post

About 15 years ago many high tech companies were moving into Ireland.  I don't know what has happened since then.  Maybe they discovered that they really don't speak english LOL.

Ireland took a great thing and screwed it up all by themselves.

 

http://www.vanityfair.com/business/features/2011/03/michael-lewis-ireland-201103

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post #24 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ochyming View Post

I am not an USA citizen, but this is good news.

...

 

Actually, this is arguably very bad new on almost any level.  

 

I know all the USA-ians are going to be hi-fiving about this, but production is actually more efficient and better economically for everyone if it's spread out around the world.  If every country had the entire supply chain for it's products within it's own borders, the world would be much worse off for it.  If China, with it's large workforce can't get enough manufacturing work for it's population it will cause huge disruption.  Disruption that will affect everyone else.  

 

Trying to keep all production in the USA is simply not a good idea and it's based in xenophobic and isolationist philosophies that were proven to be bankrupt years ago.  

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ochyming View Post

I despise the Microsoft and Google bizStrategy, it is for lazy firms like DELL and HP …

Any company can take on Apple, now with Microsoft and Google bizStrategy, going for more market share with licensing-spree it is difficult to create an Apple or Microsoft or Google-like firm from scratch.

 

 

This part is total gibberish.  What are you trying to say here?  

post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vorsos View Post
Surprising to see Texas Instruments on this list. Are they still making the same models of graphing calculators, for the same retail price, since 1994? Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

of course they are.

TI is a whole lot more than graphing calculators.  Their semiconductor business dwarfs any business they have in the educational segment.

 

Anyway, the oldest model of graphing calculator TI currently has in production is the TI-73, originally released in 1998.  Price can be a difficult thing to drive down when all the traditional competition has failed to gain any traction in recent years.

post #26 of 38

China is becoming less attractive as a manufacturing base for America because our dollar is dropping like a stone. It's getting cheaper to do things in the US.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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GOA

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post #27 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Isn't it funny that Obama is supporting slave labor rates right in this country by not enforcing immigration laws? It is pretty pathetic that those that support illegal immigration do so for the most part for their own selfish interests.

Umm..... there is absolutely no need to make this political in this cheap, partisan fashion.

 

Every single President, at least since Reagan, has dropped the ball on illegal immigration. And, you should know that it's the US Supreme Court, in a fairly unambiguous decision, that said that the Federal government's approach was (by and large) correct (again, that is not to say that I agree. Or not).

post #28 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

Trying to keep all production in the USA is simply not a good idea and it's based in xenophobic and isolationist philosophies that were proven to be bankrupt years ago. 

Oh, I am not too worried.

 

Production will ultimately stay in the US only if it can compete globally on costs, conditional on quality and speed.

post #29 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Oh, I am not too worried.

 

Production will ultimately stay in the US only if it can compete globally on costs, conditional on quality and speed.

 

Yeah.  But my point was that even if it can "compete globally on costs, conditional on quality and speed," it is still a bad idea that's bad for the planet overall.  

post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


For the most prt this is true. There are however those with a liberal mind set that think they are entitled to the job they were trained for or went to college for. I've atually seen marriages ruined over this mindset, in one case a guy laid off from the banking industry insisted on another banking job while his wife worked to support the family. Sadly ones level of education doesn't indicate their level of stupidity.

 

People's inability to grasp reality and accept what has happened is not a partisan issue.  A lot of people are just scared to death to try and do something new and they know they won't make nearly as much at something else, so they try and force getting a job in their old line of work.  Doesn't always work out.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


Hopefully these people are in the minority, for the most part Americans will take jobs where wages are competitive.
Isn't it funny that Obama is supporting slave labor rates right in this country by not enforcing immigration laws? It is pretty pathetic that those that support illegal immigration do so for the most part for their own selfish interests.

 

Well, you aren't supposed to employ illegal immigrants anyway, so how is there being a promotion of slave labor rates?  BTW, slaves were woned and not paid, so unless illegal immigrants are being chained up, whipped and not paid a dime for their efforts, you don't have a leg to stand on here.  Choose your words more carefully.

post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post



Isn't it funny that Obama is supporting slave labor rates right in this country by not enforcing immigration laws? It is pretty pathetic that those that support illegal immigration do so for the most part for their own selfish interests.

 

These "slaves" actually get paid for their work. Which means they are part of what most average Americans are a part of: wage-slavery.

post #32 of 38
Quote:

"We have a very talented pool of resources in Silicon Valley and across (the) U.S. to develop new process technologies and do cost effective manufacturing, while protecting critical intellectual property," Jain said.

 

 

 

Finally somebody gets it. Spending the last 15 years sending all our intellectual property overseas is a key reason why many overseas companies (particularly in East Asia) can effectively compete with American companies today. We give our potential competitors the technology to compete, as well as the technology to manufacture it.

 

The upshot, of course, is that American CEOs who outsource this stuff get paid to do it, because a short term boost in quarterly earnings due to reduced costs usually equates to a huge CEO bonus. It helps the richest Americans get richer, quicker. So it's great if you're a rich CEO.

 

If things go south, well the CEO always the golden parachute to fall back on.

 

Naturally, long term this process increases the disparity between the richest and poorest Americans, since the poorest ones most likely to do the assembly, etc, are the ones getting the shaft in all this. And the process is not sustainable long term. Once all our technology is in our competitor's hands, we're basically screwed.

 

It's ironic the corporate leader who made the statement quoted above is from India.

post #33 of 38
No, this is a terrible article. I've seen better in the National Enquirer.
The headline says Apples supply chain is increasing US production, inferring Apple is using more US parts.
The article itself makes the point that tracking this info is nearly impossible. So which is it?


If more US parts are going into devices, then why? Have US trade or tax policies had an effect? ALL companies put profits over patriotism.
And NO corporation has ever died defending the United States.
post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by LizSandford View Post

No, this is a terrible article. I've seen better in the National Enquirer.
The headline says Apples supply chain is increasing US production, inferring Apple is using more US parts.
The article itself makes the point that tracking this info is nearly impossible. So which is it?
If more US parts are going into devices, then why? Have US trade or tax policies had an effect? ALL companies put profits over patriotism.
And NO corporation has ever died defending the United States.

For many of the parts, it is difficult to identify the source. However, from what can be traced, it is evident that many of the parts are manufactured in the US, which is consistent with statements made by Apple executives. While reasons for this practice are not carefully examined, quotes imply that there is a preference to do business locally, without respect to US trade or tax policies. This article is not perfectly comprehensive, but it does share information we may not have known. Why not try to appreciate the article for what it is?

 

Also, the blanket statement that "ALL companies put profits over patriotism" puts them all in the same bucket, emphasizing their inherent flaws. The intent may be to raise suspicion, but I think this is counterproductive. Some companies value their public image and take steps in response to the values of their consumers. By ignoring earnest attempts to "do the right thing" and lumping all companies together, we remove incentives for good behavior. It would be more productive to help in discerning between earnest attempts at good behavior and deception. This would help to identify companies more worthy of support and help to encourage good behavior. Could we try not to expect perfection and try to do what is within our means?

post #35 of 38

"... more of the iPhone is ...". now that is just so sad and pathetic.

post #36 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by lua View Post
"... more of the iPhone is ...". now that is just so sad and pathetic.

 

In what way? It's a shortening of "more of the components of the iPhone", and as the subject changes from plural to singular, it's accurate, if non-standard.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #37 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


This part is total gibberish.  What are you trying to say here?  
Quote:
I wrote:
Quote:
I despise the Microsoft and Google bizStrategy, it is for lazy firms like DELL and HP …
Any company can take on Apple, now with Microsoft and Google bizStrategy, going for more market share with licensing-spree it is difficult to create an Apple or Microsoft or Google-like firm from scratch.


Gibberish?!

Any startUp company can take on Apple, and will be competing with Apple only, whereas competing with Google And Microsoft on the smartPhone market means competing with a bunch of lazy firms which use Google and Microsoft as an humblella.
Is that gibberish?!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Actually, this is arguably very bad new on almost any level.  

I know all the USA-ians are going to be hi-fiving about this, but production is actually more efficient and better economically for everyone if it's spread out around the world.  If every country had the entire supply chain for it's products within it's own borders, the world would be much worse off for it.  If China, with it's large workforce can't get enough manufacturing work for it's population it will cause huge disruption.  Disruption that will affect everyone else.  

Trying to keep all production in the USA is simply not a good idea and it's based in xenophobic and isolationist philosophies that were proven to be bankrupt years ago.  

I am sure you are better equipped than Apple own CEO.
Edited by Ochyming - 7/22/12 at 10:16am
post #38 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by LizSandford View Post

No, this is a terrible article. I've seen better in the National Enquirer.
The headline says Apples supply chain is increasing US production, inferring Apple is using more US parts.
The article itself makes the point that tracking this info is nearly impossible. So which is it?
If more US parts are going into devices, then why? Have US trade or tax policies had an effect? ALL companies put profits over patriotism.
And NO corporation has ever died defending the United States.

German companies pay more taxes than USA ones, and there are USA companies thriving in Germany. But most are in the greenEnergy sector.
Perhaps it is an Anglo-Saxon mentality.
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