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iOS 6 beta no longer requires Apple ID password for free apps

post #1 of 50
Thread Starter 
With the latest beta of iOS 6, users are no longer required to enter their Apple ID password when downloading free software from the App Store.

The change, currently available to developers testing the latest preview of iOS, was first discovered by a poster on Reddit and highlighted on Monday by Cult of Mac. It's unknown whether that functionality will come to users in the final release of iOS 6, when it launches for the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch this fall.

Since the first beta of iOS 6 was released in June, developers have already been able to re-download previously purchased applications without entering the password for their Apple ID account. By removing the need to enter a password when downloading free software in the latest beta, it would appear that Apple is looking to cut down on the number of times iOS users are prompted to enter their Apple ID password.

With an Apple ID account on an iOS device, a user's credit card information is stored and content like applications and music can be quickly purchased by simply entering the account password. But many of the selections available on the App Store are free software which does not result in a charge to the user's credit card.

Regardless, in all current public builds of Apple's iOS mobile operating system, users are required to enter their password. If a transaction was completed recently, users are given a 15-minute window during which additional purchases can be made.

Stores


One notable exception to the 15-minute window applies to in-app purchases. That change was made by Apple with iOS 4.3 in March of 2011 in response to complaints from parents whose children made expensive in-app purchases when using so-called "free to play" games available on the App Store.

iOS also includes built-in restrictions that can allow users to disable functions like installing or deleting applications from the App Store. In-app purchases can also be specifically barred from the built-in Settings application in iOS.

The App Store itself will also be redesigned and improved when iOS 6 launches later this year. It sports a new look with a black theme at the top and bottom, and user interface tweaks like allowing applications to install in the background without returning users to the home screen.
post #2 of 50

Finally! Been waiting for this since 2.0.

 

 


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Tim Cook using Galaxy Tabs as frisbees

 

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post #3 of 50

It probably didn't make sense to ask for a password for free apps, except possibly for apps rated 17+.

 
post #4 of 50

What if an app you download does the paid/free split with previously free downloaders getting the paid version for free via the update?

I've had that happen before, and that was the right way to do it. If you don't tie the free downloads to the Apple ID, there won't be a way to determine you've downloaded the free version in the past.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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post #5 of 50

Next up: auto-download of free updates in iTunes and on-device (via WiFi), please? :)

post #6 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

Next up: auto-download of free updates in iTunes and on-device (via WiFi), please? :)

 

You can do this with the iCloud service.

 

Type your Username/Password into iTunes, your iPad, iPod Touch, or iPhone and when you download something from the iTunes Music Store, Book Store or App Store it will download on each device automatically.

post #7 of 50

You also realise you don't need the password when updating Apps either...

post #8 of 50

Maybe Google has a patent on the auto-downloading + installing of free updates. ;)

 

Seriously, I really wish my iDevices would automatically update their applications without prompting me (for authentication or even to say "yeah, download the updates").  I don't think I've ever decided not to update any particular app that has an update.

 

Just give me a log that tells me what has been updated.

post #9 of 50

This is awesome for parents with children nagging for your password to download every single free app.

post #10 of 50

Excellent. Now remove free software from the "purchases" list. I don't want to see or be offered to re-download crapware I already deleted.

post #11 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmsley View Post

This is awesome for parents with children nagging for your password to download every single free app.

 

This is horrible for parents with children who want to download every single free app. Corrected that for you. lol.gif

post #12 of 50
The biggest improvement, IMO, is not being kicked out of the App store anymore when making a purchase. That makes it so much easier to stay in the store and spend more money. Come to think of it, maybe that's not so good. 1smile.gif
Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
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Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
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post #13 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by DancesWithLysol View Post

 

Seriously, I really wish my iDevices would automatically update their applications without prompting me (for authentication or even to say "yeah, download the updates").  I don't think I've ever decided not to update any particular app that has an update.

 

Just give me a log that tells me what has been updated.

 

Although for performance related and bug fix related updates, this would be welcomed, for other updates it can cause problems. For instance The Telegraph (UK) updated its app to charge for content. However, if you did not update the app, you managed to continue using the free service for some time. I think in this context, having manual update may be a good idea.

post #14 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmsley View Post

This is awesome for parents with children nagging for your password to download every single free app.

While I agree it's a nice feature there are cases in which I can see that any app installs should require a password. It becomes more of a chore if the only way to prevent free apps from being downloaded is to disable, buy, and then re-enable Restrictions in Settings. I'd hoped they would have an option for "Allow free apps to be downloaded without a password" or "Require free apps to use password for purchase" but I'm not seeing anything.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #15 of 50

Auto update would be a bad idea. A few times I have checked the feedback to find that the new update doesn't boot for many users so I skip it.

Same goes for any updates after a company has sold out to Zynga as they ruin everything.

 

I also think that there should be 3 sections in the app store, paid for, free but with in app purchasing and properly free.

Personally I think that IAP is making games makers greedy.

post #16 of 50

Odd. I read that weeks ago, yet it's news everywhere today.

post #17 of 50

Well, I'm saying that auto updates should be an option in iOS.  Even if people like Evilution won't chose to use it, those of us who would like it should be able to.

 

The way Android implements auto update is that you have a (optional) system-wide setting to auto update apps, and there is also a per-application setting (i.e. you can turn it off for some apps).  Also, if the security requirements for an app changes, it will not automatically update and requires the user to manually update and accept the security change.  For example, if an application that previously did not require access to the GPS sensor is updated and now requires GPS sensor access, this would be a manual update.

post #18 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post
Apple is looking to cut down on the number of times iOS users are prompted to enter their Apple ID password.

Well apple, I see another opportunity here: how about on option to disable Passcode Lock when you are on your home network? For example, I would like to use the "Remote" but not if i have to "slide to unlock" AND THEN enter the passcode just to lower the volume during commercials. This solution offeres acceptable security since the moment i step outside the range of the home network the passcode lock would get activated.

post #19 of 50

I really don't like the idea of actions that have an effect on my Apple ID not requiring a password.  Free apps are still added to my list of purchased apps, so as long as this information continues to be recorded to my account, I think a security check must be present.  This is not the same as simply installing the app, I'm not concerned about that, it's fine if people browse my collection of purchased apps and install something that I don't have there, but that doesn't mean they should have permission to change information on my Apple ID without passing a security check, especially when those changes are permanent (since it's not possible to delete apps from that list).

post #20 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by DancesWithLysol View Post

Seriously, I really wish my iDevices would automatically update their applications without prompting me (for authentication or even to say "yeah, download the updates").  I don't think I've ever decided not to update any particular app that has an update.

 

 

It should be a choice whether to update or not. There are reason someone might not want to update. Maybe they have a multiple idevices and one of the devices is running older iOS version (4.2) and the app only supports newer iOS version (4.3). Maybe a new version of the app takes up much more space due to retina graphics and they do not have a retina display so no update.

post #21 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

Next up: auto-download of free updates in iTunes and on-device (via WiFi), please? :)

We've already had this for a year.  Try to keep up. 

post #22 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by IsmOfAm View Post

Well apple, I see another opportunity here: how about on option to disable Passcode Lock when you are on your home network? For example, I would like to use the "Remote" but not if i have to "slide to unlock" AND THEN enter the passcode just to lower the volume during commercials. This solution offeres acceptable security since the moment i step outside the range of the home network the passcode lock would get activated.

Or at least allow Remote Control to be accessible from the Lock Screen in a similar fashion to how the Camera app now is.

Something else I've wanted for years — and Apple is really the only company that can offer it — is the option to have my devices go active and inactive based on their location and/or network connection.

For example, if my iPhone and iPad are connected to my home network and I'm logged into my Mac I don't want those devices getting notifications for things that are also appearing on my Mac. Besides using power to have the screen light up and it vibrate it's just annoying which means I have to take extra steps to disable those events when I get home and then re-enable when I leave again.

Another example is the ability to start a song, video, playlist, or podcast on one device and then pick up right where I left off (or back a couple seconds depending on duration between start and stop times) when I go to another device. This is what I expect from the iTunes ecosystem. I'd even be happy if it was only for those that pay for iTunes Match, a service I don't subscribe to. Note that Apple is already moving this way with iCloud Tabs that are in Mountain Lion and iOS 6, it's just surprising that iTunes/iPod is not the first use of this feature.
Edited by SolipsismX - 7/23/12 at 2:27pm

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #23 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrgibson1 View Post

You also realise you don't need the password when updating Apps either...

 

You mean won't need to. Because up through iOS 5 you do. 

 

Personally I am not particularly fond of this move to remove the password for fresh downloads. I know that it will make some folks very happy but I would rather that instead of removing it they give us the option to remove it if we like. Hopefully at least that choice will be present in Restrictions 

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #24 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawson100 View Post

 

This is horrible for parents with children who want to download every single free app. Corrected that for you. lol.gif

 

Not to mention that some of those apps might be games etc that are not age appropriate or not something that a particular parents feels is appropriate for their kid. Like my mom won't let my little sister who is 11 have the CW player app on her iPad cause that would give her access to shows like Vampire Diaries and Nikita that Mom doesn't feel are okay for her to watch. If Annie can hit install without a password she's likely to do it cause she's in that Tween rebel stage and all her friends watch such shows. (She also isn't allowed to have Facebook or twitter accounts, etc). 

 

Thus why I say I hope this is a choice not just a removal. At least in terms of Restrictions

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #25 of 50

Relying on restrictions is a mistake.  I despise the way Apple handles restrictions.  It is my biggest gripe of the iPad and pisses me off when I think about it.  I don't think they needs a complex profile/multi-user system, but simply a way to temporarily turn restrictions on and off without losing the settings.  If Apple had any real concern for the parents protecting kids from inappropriate content or poor decisions, they would make enabling/disabling restrictions more convenient.  I am not asking for much here.  Even if they simply had the iPad remember my previous restrictions when I turn them off, THAT would be a 100% improvement from what is there now.  Having it forget your restrictions when you turn them off is a feature, not a oversight.  I am 110% convinced this is purposely done to make restrictions inconvenient and time consuming so parents run out and buy a second iPad for their kids.  If wi-fi or Bluetooth worked the way restrictions work, people would pitch a fit because the iPad would forget all remembered wi-fi networks or all paired devices when those features were disabled.  People would find that unacceptable and Apple would have to change it.  But since restrictions are rarely used by the majority of consumers, that is EXACTLY how they behave and Apple gets away with it.  It is completely and utterly INSANE and is really got me wondering if I would buy an iPad if I had to do it over again.  I certainly warn parents about it.

 

Don't get me wrong.  I am very happy with my iPad overall, but I feel pretty passionately that Apple is trying to make extra money off of protective and concerned parents, and I find that pretty offensive.  

post #26 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawson100 View Post

 

This is horrible for parents with children who want to download every single free app. Corrected that for you. lol.gif

 

Apple could introduce the idea of sub-accounts on the iOS, allowing control and disk usage.  Although Apple solves this by selling it to each member of the family, some households actually "share" the iPad.  "64Gb isn't always enough for everyone"..

post #27 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawson100 View Post

 

This is horrible for parents with children who want to download every single free app. Corrected that for you. lol.gif

Excellent observation. Hopefully, parents will be able to ensure a password opt-in for this important function.

post #28 of 50

Actually what would be cool is a "guest" account.  "Sure you can borrow my iDevice to browse the web or call your friend."  But we can't currently do that without giving access to everything.

post #29 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

 

It should be a choice whether to update or not. There are reason someone might not want to update. Maybe they have a multiple idevices and one of the devices is running older iOS version (4.2) and the app only supports newer iOS version (4.3). Maybe a new version of the app takes up much more space due to retina graphics and they do not have a retina display so no update.

 

And Android provides that choice. Apple should do the same.

post #30 of 50

bascically, this removal of password for free apps will bring more people to use apps. Many people don't have Apple ID and they are reluctant to create one just for free apps. Now there is no requirement for Apple ID to get free apps.

post #31 of 50

Good news, as small a step as it is to type in a password, it's tedious, especially with how frequent apps are updated.

 

I also hope they have fixed an annoyance when you are updating a batch of apps and one of them is 17+ and it freezes the downloads after 30 seconds until you realize it is asking to confirm. It would be nice if you could set a one time setting to always allow the installation of 'mature' apps rather than manually confirming them every single time.

post #32 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmsley View Post

 

Apple could introduce the idea of sub-accounts on the iOS, allowing control and disk usage.  Although Apple solves this by selling it to each member of the family, some households actually "share" the iPad.  "64Gb isn't always enough for everyone"..

 

I've about given up on the idea of sub-accounts.  I guess Apple considers it too "complex" or something.  I can see where having data for each sub-account separate could make syncing and storage management more complicated.  Perhaps having profiles maintained at the app level is the better option.  

 

That said, something needs to be done to make restrictions flexible.  Right now, unless every person who uses the iPad is willing to put up with the restrictions, the current implementation is pointless.  As soon as you disable them, the device forgets what they were.

 

A guest account (mentioned before) might be the answer.  I would see this to be something that could be enabled or disabled.  When enabled, you could bypass the lock screen code by clicking "Use as Guest" or something similar.  Restrictions would be applied to the guest account but would be disabled when entering the lock code.  No data would be separate .  The only thing that would be whether restrictions are enabled or not.  If you wanted data protected you would have to add a restriction to the app.  This would probably require one additional setting to specify whether newly installed apps default to allowed or restricted.

post #33 of 50

That's a good idea!

post #34 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by chudq View Post
Many people don't have Apple ID… 

 

That's not right.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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post #35 of 50

As long as there's a corresponding parental control to restore the old "authenticate for any app" policy, I'll be happy.

 

My son wants a new app every 5 minutes, and I'm not having that.

post #36 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evilution View Post

Auto update would be a bad idea. A few times I have checked the feedback to find that the new update doesn't boot for many users so I skip it.

Same goes for any updates after a company has sold out to Zynga as they ruin everything.

 

I also think that there should be 3 sections in the app store, paid for, free but with in app purchasing and properly free.

Personally I think that IAP is making games makers greedy.

Agreed! I like to decide for myself if updating an App is needed...

post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoXoM View Post

Agreed! I like to decide for myself if updating an App is needed...

I can see why a power user would want that option, and assume that if such a feature was added that it would be option, but I can't recall in 4+ years of iPhone App Store use of ever seeing an update and deciding not to update it. It's just something I do and something I also hate doing because of the number of steps involved in initiating it in iTunes and then choosing to sync to my iDevices. For those reasons I'd love to have this feature.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #38 of 50

See, this is what I'm talking about....Apple is constantly updating and improving hardware and software....incremental improvements along with the occasional inventive product! :) Most companies don't do this unless their "forced" to do it by the competition!

 

Apple does it because it's in their DNA. Just look at the way they had control of the iPod market (~75%) and all the new models they came out with over and over again.

 

Steve-o said, "in tech the only way to survive is to be 10 years ahead of the competition."  Everyone else is just trying to make the "cheapest" crap products possible! :)  

post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

We've already had this for a year.  Try to keep up. 

 

Really?

 

According to this article (and this one, and this one) it's still impossible to auto-update apps.

post #40 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawson100 View Post

 

This is horrible for parents with children who want to download every single free app. Corrected that for you. lol.gif

 

Agree 100%, this would be OK if it were configurable, but I could only imagine how many apps I'd have on my phone if my daughter could just randomly download any free games out there (and that most free games are just a shill IMO for in-app purchasing anyway).

 

Plus, as it stands today, the apps installed on my iPhone automatically show up on my iPad (though I do know this is configurable).

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   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

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