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Notes of interest from Apple's Q3 2012 conference call - Page 2

post #41 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

They're also perhaps expecting the dollar to depreciate.

 

Considering we're in a global recession, the Federal Reserve in the US has openly manipulated markets and the value of the dollar, Apple has done pretty well.

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post #42 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Of course the latter, since any time anyone says Apple will do something and they don't, there's no recognition thereof. This has nothing to do with integrity or chutzpah whatsoever. I see no logical reason for the existence of a smaller iPad, just as I saw no logical reason for the existence of a smaller iPhone. If Apple thinks there is one, they're welcome to try. They've been quite wrong about a desire/market/purpose for some products before.

For an opposing and well-reasoned point of view.

 

http://www.macworld.com/article/1167833/opinion_googles_nexus_7_makes_the_case_for_a_smaller_ipad.html

post #43 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

There. No need for a smaller one.

So the fact that record numbers of people are buying iPads is proof that there's no window for any other size? I hope you're not taking a critical thinking course. You just failed if you are.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

No, you haven't even begun to get it: there's no purpose for a smaller one.

I see that you're still thinking that you're the only one entitled to an opinion. Why should anyone listen to your opinion over the tons of people who posted here who DO see a need for a smaller one?
Quote:
Originally Posted by daylove22 View Post

Why are you lying? Apple missed revenue big time
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-07-24/apple-falls-short-of-analysts-expectations-amid-iphone-slump.html

Apples and oranges. This article compares Apple's results to the year ago quarter. Apple grew handsomely (20% increase in profits). The analysts predicted a larger increase, but Apple never promised it. In fact, Apple beat its own guidance, as well. So where is the lie?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Apple cares about the user experience more than anything. From a usability perspective, a 7" tablet is worse at everything than a ~10" one.

And the user experience of a 27" iMac is better than a 21". Apple should drop the 21" iMac. And they should drop the 16 and 32 GB iPhones. And they should only sell dual processor Mac Pros. And the MacBook Air line should be eliminated entirely and they should only sell the 15" rMBP.

See how silly that sounds? "worse than a 10" one" doesn't mean "bad". It's also better at many things and equal at many more.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleGreen View Post

A 7% decline in gross margins is pretty significant.  That means Apple is willing to sell at lower prices so that there isn't much of a price umbrella for competition to succeed.  I can see them offering a 7.85" iPad at $200 to $250 level to prevent Google and Amazon from succeeding.

The GM decline is very surprising. There are several options:
1. Lowering their prices to be competitive. Since sales are still growing at double digit rates, that doesn't seem likely.

2. Major change in product mix. This is likely to be part of it. If a new iPhone comes out in October and they're already seeing some customers holding off, they may be predicting lower iPhone sales next quarter (I didn't check their projections). Since the iPhone is quite profitable, a drop in sales would reduce overall margins.

3. Changing exchange rates. Since so much of what Apple sells is imported, a weaker dollar would hurt margins in the US. However, less than half of their business is in the US, so the impact would be reduced somewhat. Products sold in other countries could get higher or lower margins depending on relative exchange rates.

4. Major increase in manufacturing cost. This doesn't seem likely unless they know something that hasn't hit the business newspapers yet.

In any event, a 7% swing in margins over one quarter is HUGE.
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post #44 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post
So the fact that record numbers of people are buying iPads is proof that there's no window for any other size? I hope you're not taking a critical thinking course. You just failed if you are.

 

No, I'd say more the fact that people aren't moving to existing 7" tablets in droves is reason enough to think the majority doesn't want a smaller one. And don't claim it's because there's no "iOS version" of a 7" tablet, because that didn't stop people from moving away from the iPhone.

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post #45 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

 

They can put the 32nm A5 in which will reduce power consumption and give the same performance. The smaller screen will also consume significantly less power. Even though the battery will be smaller, the capacity should easily be offset by the screen and new A5. Result is the same performance and same battery life.

 

It would be better for reading e-books because of the weight. It would be better for kids in early grades (like K-3) because of the smaller size. You could mount it in your car as a NAV much easier than the regular iPad. It would be a good way to get into gaming and challenge the Wii U or Vita. It would be something parents are a little less wary to give to kids because of the lower price.

 

I'm not sure I'd use one. But people are buying smaller tablets so there is a market for them. If Apple made a smaller iPad they'd deal a serious blow to their competitors who only seem to have success in this market and can't compete at all against Apple in the 10" tablet space.

And if they were to put an A5 in it what would be the price? I'm sure it'd be higher than the $249 target many here think the Mini would need to succeed.

post #46 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Apple cares about the user experience more than anything. From a usability perspective, a 7" tablet is worse at everything than a ~10" one.

 

This is just like the netbook craze five years ago. Companies made 7" laptops. No one actually wants a 7" laptop, since they're unusable. So netbooks got bigger. They made 8" and 9", and finally netbooks settled around 10" before becoming completely worthless. Let's ISOT Apple away in… 2007. I figure netbooks would have only gotten even bigger until they weren't even netbooks anymore, but rather very cheap, very poorly hardware'd laptops.

I think you will be very much proven wrong on the iPad mini debate.


Edited by monstrosity - 7/24/12 at 4:29pm
post #47 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

No, I'd say more the fact that people aren't moving to existing 7" tablets in droves is reason enough to think the majority doesn't want a smaller one. And don't claim it's because there's no "iOS version" of a 7" tablet, because that didn't stop people from moving away from the iPhone.

If the big three of Walt Mossberg, David Pogue and MG Siegler all have good comments on Google's Nexus 7 it's either signaling the End of Days or there's something worthy about 7" tablets.

 http://www.forbes.com/sites/briancaulfield/2012/07/16/mossberg-pogue-seigler-googles-nexus-7-trifecta-is-complete/

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post #48 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

iPod touch accounted for more than half of iPods sold, and iPod sales were higher than Apple expected.
 

 

No actual numbers? I suspect that's because the sales are falling at an alarming rate. Not sure the next iPod Touch will do much to arrest that. All the kids will want an iPad Mini for Christmas instead of an iPod this year and I still maintain the iPod Touch is simply too expensive compared to the increasing number of decent smartphones for under £200.

post #49 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

No, I'd say more the fact that people aren't moving to existing 7" tablets in droves is reason enough to think the majority doesn't want a smaller one. And don't claim it's because there's no "iOS version" of a 7" tablet, because that didn't stop people from moving away from the iPhone.

Again, your logic fails.

In order to buy a 7" tablet today, they'd have to not only choose a different tablet size, but an inferior OS and inferior hardware. Plus, 7" tablet sales have been significant (something like 20% of the entire tablet market). There's no way of knowing how many people would buy a 7" APPLE tablet based on the sales of the existing 7" tablets.
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post #50 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shojin Monkey View Post

Wasn't there any statement about the supposed imminent dividend?

 

Probably didn't want the share price to tank any further than it already has in after hours trading (down over 5% at 23.20 GMT). Probably announce it later when the markets calm down.

post #51 of 96
post #52 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

 There's no way of knowing how many people would buy a 7" APPLE tablet based on the sales of the existing 7" tablets.

 

One way to solve this debate - release the iPad Mini and see how many it sells. If nobody buys it then axe it. Problem solved, debate over. We will all know the numbers and the iPad Mini doubters can move on to whining about something else.

post #53 of 96

I'm looking forward to both the iPad mini AND the "iPhone 5" ;)

post #54 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

 

No actual numbers? I suspect that's because the sales are falling at an alarming rate. Not sure the next iPod Touch will do much to arrest that. All the kids will want an iPad Mini for Christmas instead of an iPod this year and I still maintain the iPod Touch is simply too expensive compared to the increasing number of decent smartphones for under £200.

iPod sales declined 10% from 7.5M a year ago to 6.8M.

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post #55 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

 

One way to solve this debate - release the iPad Mini and see how many it sells. If nobody buys it then axe it. Problem solved, debate over. We will all know the numbers and the iPad Mini doubters can move on to whining about something else.

Please tell me you only forget to add the /s to the end of this post.

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post #56 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

And if they were to put an A5 in it what would be the price? I'm sure it'd be higher than the $249 target many here think the Mini would need to succeed.

 

The smaller screen will cost less. The smaller battery will cost less. The smaller size of the case means it will be cheaper (and easier) to make and still offer high quality.

 

The iPad is what people want. Apple can charge $50-100 more for a tablet than anyone else can because there's additional perceived value in an iPad. They can do an 8GB for $249 and a 16GB for $299 ($50 more than Nexus) and still make money, IMO.

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post #57 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by silverpraxis View Post

Please tell me you only forget to add the /s to the end of this post.

 

What? /s?

post #58 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

 

The smaller screen will cost less. The smaller battery will cost less. The smaller size of the case means it will be cheaper (and easier) to make and still offer high quality.

 

The iPad is what people want. Apple can charge $50-100 more for a tablet than anyone else can because there's additional perceived value in an iPad. They can do an 8GB for $249 and a 16GB for $299 ($50 more than Nexus) and still make money, IMO.

As I've said they might "make money" but the profit margins will be far lower and the Mini will probably cannibalize 30% of the higher margin iPad's sales.

 

Remember we're talking about a device that's screen is not even 2 inches smaller. It's still a big sheet of glass needed and if it has Retina like so many are hoping the battery will still have to be a decent size and all these components need to fit in a smaller case.

 

There really isn't much cost benefit if the specs match the current iPads. If they want to price it at $249 I think we're looking at an A4 chip at best and low res screen.

post #59 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

 

The smaller screen will cost less. The smaller battery will cost less. The smaller size of the case means it will be cheaper (and easier) to make and still offer high quality.

 

The iPad is what people want. Apple can charge $50-100 more for a tablet than anyone else can because there's additional perceived value in an iPad. They can do an 8GB for $249 and a 16GB for $299 ($50 more than Nexus) and still make money, IMO.

I'm not sure about a smaller iPad at all, but if it came to fruition, I think a 16GB $299 makes since, but not an 8GB $249. The don't even sell a current model iPhone with 8GB anymore.

 

But with a possible larger-screened iPod Touch (to match the speculative larger-screened 6th gen iPhone), will an iPad mini still be necessary?

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post #60 of 96
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Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

If the big three of Walt Mossberg, David Pogue and MG Siegler all have good comments on Google's Nexus 7 it's either signaling the End of Days or there's something worthy about 7" tablets.

 http://www.forbes.com/sites/briancaulfield/2012/07/16/mossberg-pogue-seigler-googles-nexus-7-trifecta-is-complete/

Anything that's priced that low is going to get good reviews. The Nexus is great for the money. Fact is Apple isn't going to release a product that offers them no profits (after R&D is accounted for you can't tell me Google isn't coming in at a loss on the Nexus).

post #61 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

As I've said they might "make money" but the profit margins will be far lower and the Mini

 

I very much doubt that. Apple maintains a healthy margin across all of it's products - even the low price ones like the Shuffle and the Nano. I can't see them lowering their margins - they will either have a higher price point or use cheaper components from last year to reduce the BoM. Otherwise they simply wouldn't bother.

post #62 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post
In order to buy a 7" tablet today, they'd have to not only choose a different tablet size, but an inferior OS and inferior hardware. Plus, 7" tablet sales have been significant (something like 20% of the entire tablet market). There's no way of knowing how many people would buy a 7" APPLE tablet based on the sales of the existing 7" tablets.

 

I just said that isn't a concern… did you bother reading my post?

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post #63 of 96

Put out a NEW iPhone every 6 months

 

Apple has to be analyzing this internally.

 

They must be assessing if the release of a NEW iPhone model every 6 month's may address

what Tim Cook said might be affecting iPhone sales:

 

"there is "incredible anticipation" for future products that has affected sales, though the exact impact is "difficult to sort out."

 

I know Apple knows tons better than I do but, I am just saying
 

post #64 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

And when the 4th iPad comes out next spring and the iPad 2 is $299, all this 7" crap will peter out.

 

 

I hope the 7" discussion (what you kindly call "crap") continues.

 

I want a smaller form factor, and my desire is not in any way related to price.  They could give away the older version for free and it would be too large.  And my iPhone is too small.

 

There are also obviously quite a few people here who want one, too, and discussing it is fun and healthy and harmless.  Not to mention what I believe is the purpose of the discussion boards. Whether Apple make then smaller device is an entirely different matter.  A few years ago, though, there was no iPad.  Out of the blue, they created it and with it, a need.  Now that it is out, people start playing with the concept (as they do and have done with Macs for years) and many seem to want a smaller device, and they want to talk about it.

 

May they continue to make their voices heard!


Edited by Bergermeister - 7/24/12 at 5:46pm

 

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post #65 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

 

What? /s?

A sarcasm tag. Because saying a responsible business decision is to make a device simply to see if the public will buy it, is a bit silly. When Steve Jobs introduced the original iPad, he spoke of years of internal research determining the optimal size of the device so there would be no compromise in user interface or its varying components. Not to say, Apple hasn't been internally researching a smaller device for future public release, but to argue Apple should release such a device simply to see if it has marketability is silly.

 

The only time I can think Apple did this in recent history is AppleTV, but that was an admittedly niche product to begin with that shared most of it's R&D budget with the iPhone. Creating a smaller iPad would take considerably more resources given it's a mobile product whose form factor, internal layout, battery life, and heat dissipation are crucial for it to be able to be brought to market (unlike AppleTV).

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post #66 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by silverpraxis View Post

A sarcasm tag. Because saying a responsible business decision is to make a device simply to see if the public will buy it, is a bit silly. When Steve Jobs introduced the original iPad, he spoke of years of internal research determining the optimal size of the device so there would be no compromise in user interface or its varying components. Not to say, Apple hasn't been internally researching a smaller device for future public release, but to argue Apple should release such a device simply to see if it has marketability is silly.

 

The only time I can think Apple did this in recent history is AppleTV, but that was an admittedly niche product to begin with that shared most of it's R&D budget with the iPhone. Creating a smaller iPad would take considerably more resources given it's a mobile product whose form factor, internal layout, battery life, and heat dissipation are crucial for it to be able to be brought to market (unlike AppleTV).

 

Steve Jobs famously said that he never did any market research, he just went on gut instinct. Some would say that is probably why he had just as many failures as successes. But he didn't care about that. If it tanks what the hell at least we tried. What I suggested is EXACTLY what Steve would do. Either you believe in the product or you don't and if he did he would refine it to be the best it can be yes but ultimately he was taking a gamble that it would sell. Sometimes in life you just have to jump in the deep end and hope things work out.

post #67 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

 

I very much doubt that. Apple maintains a healthy margin across all of it's products - even the low price ones like the Shuffle and the Nano. I can't see them lowering their margins - they will either have a higher price point or use cheaper components from last year to reduce the BoM. Otherwise they simply wouldn't bother.

Yup, we're on the same page. That's what I was saying in my post.

 

Apple is only going to do it if they sell it at a higher price point than profit losing Android tablets, which would negate a lot of consumers looking for a small = cheap tablet, or they're going to use old components which would look bad as far as PR and disappoint people that want it all: Retina A6 LTE $199 price tag etc.

 

This is why I have a suspicion that a smaller iPad could be an iPod simply because people expect cheaper components and such in the iPod line. People expect the iPad to remain premium.

post #68 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

 

Steve Jobs famously said that he never did any market research, he just went on gut instinct. Some would say that is probably why he had just as many failures as successes. But he didn't care about that. If it tanks what the hell at least we tried. What I suggested is EXACTLY what Steve would do. Either you believe in the product or you don't and if he did he would refine it to be the best it can be yes but ultimately he was taking a gamble that it would sell. Sometimes in life you just have to jump in the deep end and hope things work out.

Market research and internal research are two separate beasts, you can do one without the other or do both. And judging that we have direct evidence of a early iPad prototype from approximately 2004, we can safely say Apple did extended internally research and built various prototypes of a "tablet PC" prior to releasing a finished product now called the iPad.

 

A large business owner (or CEO or high level manager) can go on gut instinct and tell their company to make any mythical product they fancy, but they cede the building of it, the operability of it, the marketing of it to various teams to make it a reality. Those teams don't go on gut instinct to build the product, they go on hard science, architecture and design techniques, and available components to build it. Some companies do market research to determine aesthetic elements, some internal research, most do a bit of both. Apple has the luxury of having design gurus and brilliant decision makers so internal research is all they need to be successful currently.

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post #69 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

Yup, we're on the same page. That's what I was saying in my post.

 

Apple is only going to do it if they sell it at a higher price point than profit losing Android tablets, which would negate a lot of consumers looking for a small = cheap tablet, or they're going to use old components which would look bad as far as PR and disappoint people that want it all: Retina A6 LTE $199 price tag etc.

 

This is why I have a suspicion that a smaller iPad could be an iPod simply because people expect cheaper components and such in the iPod line. People expect the iPad to remain premium.

 

Agreed, calling it the new iPod rather than iPad Mini would certainly help to differentiate it from the 10" iPad. I had a sneaky suspicion that they might call it something new like the iPlay but I doubt it.

 

I agree with your logic, the only doubt I have is that the iPod is so well established in the collective mindset as a small pocket device that it might just confuse people which is why in the end I think they might stick with the iPad name.

 

If you think about it we have the 11" & 13" MBA, the 13" & 15" MBP, the 21" & 27" iMac so I guess it would not be completely out of left field to simply have a 7" & 10" iPad rather than the iPad and iPad Mini.

 

I think this year might well be the year they drop the Touch name and just call it the new iPod. Hopefully the iPod Nano will become the iWatch.

post #70 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by silverpraxis View Post

Market research and internal research are two separate beasts, you can do one without the other or do both. And judging that we have direct evidence of a early iPad prototype from approximately 2004, we can safely say Apple did extended internally research and built various prototypes of a "tablet PC" prior to releasing a finished product now called the iPad.

 

A large business owner (or CEO or high level manager) can go on gut instinct and tell their company to make any mythical product they fancy, but they cede the building of it, the operability of it, the marketing of it to various teams to make it a reality. Those teams don't go on gut instinct to build the product, they go on hard science, architecture and design techniques, and available components to build it. Some companies do market research to determine aesthetic elements, some internal research, most do a bit of both. Apple has the luxury of having design gurus and brilliant decision makers so internal research is all they need to be successful currently.

 

If only it was that simple. I'm sure those experts spent a lot of time on the Mac Cube or the iPod HiFi. In the end it's still a judgement call without any guarantee of success. No amount of internal research or time spent deliberating can guarantee a hit product. If it did there would be no product failures and we would all have betamax players gathering dust in the loft.

post #71 of 96

What's a miss for Apple is killer numbers for just about anybody else.  It's amazing how spoiled everyone has come.

 

Still, we're so used to Apple putting up video game-like statistics that we now have inevitable Monday Morning Quarterbacking about just what went wrong.  In a nutshell:

 

1.  It's the summer!  Everyone knows a new iPhone debuts in 60-70 days from now.  We used to see this same slackoff in the spring in the "old days" of three years ago.  Apple has gotten so predictable with these launches that you don't have to be a wall street analyst to know when to buy an iPhone if you want the latest and greatest.

 

2.  Gross margins are down because iPhones are down...it's a simple as that.  The iPhone's profit margin is pretty insane.  Any weakness there will end up in the margins number.  That being said, most like companies would still kill puppies for that margin they got anyway.

 

3.  Ivy bridge delay.  New Ivy Bridge Macs only were sold for 3 weeks out of the quarter.  If they had missed the entire quarter, Macs might have had a sales decrease.  And that leads to...

 

4.  Watching Apple is a spectator sport.  As much as Apple tries to be secret, Apple is beholden to many truths in the market like technology launches by key vendors like Intel, Christmas comes every year on the same day and Back to School is the same time of year, etc.  Oh, and iPads come in early Spring.  Watching Apple's moves is nothing new...except that there are a ton more people doing it.  Probably the only product launch we don't know if the fabled television set, and that product's existence is the worst kept secret in Silicon Valley.

 

5.  And yes, the worldwide economy sucks.  Given the headwinds here and especially in Europe, I'm surprised its not worse.  But Apple's customer base is  not as price sensitive so they've largely been spared from the Great Recession.  But they are not completely immune.

post #72 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

 

Agreed, calling it the new iPod rather than iPad Mini would certainly help to differentiate it from the 10" iPad. I had a sneaky suspicion that they might call it something new like the iPlay but I doubt it.

 

I agree with your logic, the only doubt I have is that the iPod is so well established in the collective mindset as a small pocket device that it might just confuse people which is why in the end I think they might stick with the iPad name.

 

If you think about it we have the 11" & 13" MBA, the 13" & 15" MBP, the 21" & 27" iMac so I guess it would not be completely out of left field to simply have a 7" & 10" iPad rather than the iPad and iPad Mini.

 

I think this year might well be the year they drop the Touch name and just call it the new iPod. Hopefully the iPod Nano will become the iWatch.

I can see the sense of having a 7 inch & 10 inch iPad with similar specs, but the 7 inch model would probably be $299 at the least which wouldn't help Apple compete with the likes of Amazon or Google on price, which it seems is what many tech writers want.

 

As far as a bigger iPod not being pocketable, I think the term pocketable has changed meaning today versus 10 years ago. Today the Nexus 7 and Galaxy Note are considered "pocket sized" versus 10 years ago anything bigger than an iPod was considered too big.

 

And I'm right there with you on a connected watch type concept for the next Nano. Big market there.

post #73 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Of course the latter, since any time anyone says Apple will do something and they don't, there's no recognition thereof. This has nothing to do with integrity or chutzpah whatsoever. I see no logical reason for the existence of a smaller iPad, just as I saw no logical reason for the existence of a smaller iPhone. If Apple thinks there is one, they're welcome to try. They've been quite wrong about a desire/market/purpose for some products before.

 

I'm pretty sure Apple had been wrong much less than you have, and I don't recall in recent memory where they've been wrong about a major product and its market. Also, the fact that you're making an equivocation between a smaller iPad and a smaller iPhone is mind-numbingly idiotic, and I'm sure everyone on this board realizes that except you. They're different products with different variables. You don't need to see a 'logical reason' for anything- fact is, if Apple comes out with this (and they probably will) and subsequent sell tens/hundreds of millions of units (which they probably will), and it becomes one of their most successful products, your 'logic' is irrelevant. But I have no doubt even at that point you'll keep jabbering about how its such a bad idea, because you've shown you're incredibly consistent in that what actually happens in reality has little regard on your thinking and conclusions. 

post #74 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by focher View Post

The issue is around the concept of a "price umbrella". At a $399 entry point, the problem is that Apple created a tablet market and competitors finally figured out that they can come in at the lower price points (now at $199 with the Nexus 7) and capture market share without competing with Apple. It was one thing when there was no traction for the other products, but Apple can't realistically leave that segment unanswered because it will just dilute the iPad's domination of the tablet market - or at least make it look diluted when you look at market share numbers.

I'm not suggesting Apple would enter that segment just to be in that segment. I firmly believe Apple doesn't enter a market or segment unless it feels it is going to field the best product in that segment. But if they are confident of their product offering, they aren't going to fail to make the right business decision out of some allegiance to a past stated "rule".

Stop believing every article John Gruber provides a link for. A iPad mini is a little too " me too" ish for Apple.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #75 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

 

 

No, you haven't even begun to get it: there's no purpose for a smaller one.

 

 

So says you. The Christmas Quarter will see Apple face new challenges in the form of a well reviewed cheap Google tablet, and updated Amazon Fires. The only place these competitors can hurt Apple is at the low end of the market, which in this economy might be popular. I personally will buy the smaller iPad if released. I don't want to spend $500 dollars, and don't need the screen to be so large. 

post #76 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post
The Christmas Quarter will see Apple face new challenges in the form of a well reviewed cheap Google tablet, and updated Amazon Fires. The only place these competitors can hurt Apple is at the low end of the market, which in this economy might be popular.
Ho-hum. "Competitors" come up every quarter. "This economy sucks" every quarter. Four years running. Apple doesn't seem to even exist in that plane.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #77 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

...iTunes Store launched in over 12 countries...

 

Over 12 countries... so that would be, what, 13?

post #78 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

I can see the sense of having a 7 inch & 10 inch iPad with similar specs, but the 7 inch model would probably be $299 at the least which wouldn't help Apple compete with the likes of Amazon or Google on price, which it seems is what many tech writers want.

 

As far as a bigger iPod not being pocketable, I think the term pocketable has changed meaning today versus 10 years ago. Today the Nexus 7 and Galaxy Note are considered "pocket sized" versus 10 years ago anything bigger than an iPod was considered too big.

 

And I'm right there with you on a connected watch type concept for the next Nano. Big market there.

 

 

I disagree with the price issue. Sure the competitor products are going for two hundred dollars, but there is a big difference between two hundred dollars and four hundred dollars. However, a hundred dollars more doesn't sound like a lot, and I think most people would go with a slightly higher priced Apple product than the competitors offerings.  Further, the mini would be a popular gift for others, where as people might be more inclined to buy the larger model for themselves. Finally, I don't get the impression Apple wants to give Google a foothold in the tablet market at all. 

post #79 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Ho-hum. "Competitors" come up every quarter. "This economy sucks" every quarter. Four years running. Apple doesn't seem to even exist in that plane.

 

 

Yes, except Amazon's product did do exceptionally well. It didn't sustain its momentum after the holidays, but rumor is it has a big line up planned for the holidays. Further, Apple hasn't faced a tablet competitor with well lined pockets like Google yet. Google's product is also getting good reviews. Many people will find its $199 price tag appealing.

 

Jobs once famously said if somebody is going to cannibalize your sales it is best to do it yourself. I think Apple will introduce a less capable iPad for around $299. This puts the hurt on Google and Amazon, but also makes the product more affordable to companies and institutions. I can see  places like banks giving them away to open accounts, like some banks did with the iPod Touch. 

 

My only question is timing. It would be odd to see Apple introduce two major products in the same quarter. However, if Apple were to release a smaller iPad it seems crazy to introduce it at some time other than the holiday quarter, which seems to be when the iPhone will be released. 

post #80 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

How do you know is!? Is that pulled out of.... thin air, or can you back that up?
Kindle Fire, for one. And while we don't know exact numbers, the statistics we've seen suggest anywhere from 10-20% of the overall tablet market is going to someone other than Apple. I'm not doomsaying. The iPad IS the tablet market right now. But if Apple feels it has an excellent product for the smaller form factor segment (actually, I should say "middle size" because the iPod Touch is the smaller form factor) then its unlikely they will cede market share to the also rans.
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