or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › 1 killed, 4 injured in chlorine gas leak at Apple supplier Catcher
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

1 killed, 4 injured in chlorine gas leak at Apple supplier Catcher

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
A chlorine gas leak at a Catcher Technology plant in eastern China killed one person and injured four, the Apple supplier confirmed on Friday.

The incident occurred during "routine work" at a liquid-waste treatment workshop in Suzhou, Catcher spokesman James Wu said, according to The Wall Street Journal. Catcher builds unibody metal cases for Apple's MacBook lineup, and also supplies components to other companies such as Dell and HTC.

Of the employees that are injured, three are said to be in serious condition, while one has reportedly been transferred out of intensive care. The factory where the incident occurred was previously given a worst-possible "black" rating by the Suzhou Municipal Environmental Protection Bureau.

The incident comes after Apple initiated a strong crackdown on its overseas supply chain, following criticism asserting that Apple's devices are assembled by workers who earn low pay and operate in unsafe working conditions.

Earlier this year, Apple became the first technology company to request independent audits of its overseas supply chain from the Fair Labor Association. Initial inspections from the FLA found a number of violations at Foxconn, Apple's assembly partner.

New Manufacturing Process
Apple's unibody manufacturing process was detailed in this 2008 video.


This week's incident at a Catcher plant isn't the first time an employee has died on the job at a Chinese plant of one of Apple's partners. Two workers were killed at a Foxconn iPad assembly plant in 2011, while a handful of employee suicides at Foxconn's facilities also gained international attention.

This March, Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook himself visited a Foxconn iPhone plant in Zhengzhou, China, to see first-hand the facility. That visit came after a series of reports on Apple and Foxconn stirred up debates about labor rights in China.

For years, Apple has also conducted its own internal audits of its overseas supply chain. The latest report, issued in January, found no intentional underage labor in 229 audits, a marked improvement from the 49 underage workers Apple discovered in its audits released in 2011.
post #2 of 35

"How dare Apple let this happen. This is entirely their fault."

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #3 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

"How dare Apple let this happen. This is entirely their fault."

 

Come on, Skil, didn't you know?

 

Apple is supposed to be everywhere at all times, aware of every possible situation at each of their suppliers' operations, and able to predict every possible eventuality.

 

(And leap over tall buildings in a single bound.)

post #4 of 35

Have some dignity and change this phrase: "a handful of suicides"

Handfuls are for trivial things like food and change, not people's lives -- no matter how much you don't seem to value them because it makes your favorite company look bad.

 

Hopefully, conditions were already being worked on in that plant. I do feel that Apple has been doing more than due diligence as they are having a widespread influence on those who work for them in these factories. You can argue that Apple is not directly responsible, but it's in everyone's best interest to take each individual's life seriously in the chain of those who create these great products and Apple has great power to make positive change in this regard.

 

No one should die at a factory job for a device of convenience.

post #5 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Come on, Skil, didn't you know?

Apple is supposed to be everywhere at all times, aware of every possible situation at each of their suppliers' operations, and able to predict every possible eventuality.

(And leap over tall buildings in a single bound.)

And, of course, if they did that, all the whiners would be complaining about how they micromanage things and won't let their suppliers have any autonomy.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #6 of 35

What is Apple's proportion of responsibility here?  Dell and HP sold several times more notebooks than Apple. 
 

post #7 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronsullivan View Post

Have some dignity and change this phrase: "a handful of suicides"

Handfuls are for trivial things like food and change, not people's lives -- no matter how much you don't seem to value them because it makes your favorite company look bad.

 

Good point.  How many suicides can you fit in a hand anyway?

post #8 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronsullivan View Post

Have some dignity and change this phrase: "a handful of suicides"

Handfuls are for trivial things like food and change, not people's lives -- no matter how much you don't seem to value them because it makes your favorite company look bad.

 

...

 

Actually you are just making that up about it being "only for trivial things."  

You sound way oversensitive to me, but possibly you are one of those that "doesn't like to be judged" as well?   

 

Damn, I wish we could still use smiley's here!  

If ever there was a post that deserved a :rolleyes: yours it it. 

post #9 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronsullivan View Post

Have some dignity and change this phrase: "a handful of suicides"
Handfuls are for trivial things like food and change, not people's lives -- no matter how much you don't seem to value them because it makes your favorite company look bad.

Hopefully, conditions were already being worked on in that plant. I do feel that Apple has been doing more than due diligence as they are having a widespread influence on those who work for them in these factories. You can argue that Apple is not directly responsible, but it's in everyone's best interest to take each individual's life seriously in the chain of those who create these great products and Apple has great power to make positive change in this regard.

No one should die at a factory job for a device of convenience.

Oh please, get off your humanist hobby horse. Without that "device of convenience" literally thousands would be starving or worse for lack of employment. While you are absolutely correct about taking each individual's life seriously there is the Mr. Spock philosophy of "the needs of the many outway the needs of the few... or one." Workers all over the world die on the job every day for one reason to another. I just try to make sure I'm not one of them.
post #10 of 35

C'mon AI, only one person got killed! More than 100.000 people get killed annually in China in factory accidents. That makes 274 deaths/day. You are so concerned about Chinese work conditions - why don't you have every day another 273 articles about factory deaths in China. And how about factory deaths in Cambodia, Vietnam, Myanmar, Ivory Cost, Nigeria, Paraguay, Costa Rica, and maybe also USA. Why are you only concerned about China? Are other countries less equal?

 

And how about using child slavery in cocoa production especially in Ivory Cost, you AI chocolate asses? You have children killed to get your daily overdose of chocolate -shame on you!

post #11 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronsullivan View Post


No one should die at a factory job for a device of convenience.

At statement like that implies it was Apples fault because they are one of the clients. In a good 90% of these stories there is no proof that it was on an Apple line or even in the building that houses the Apple line. Or that the issue was work related rather than some guy that just happened to wok on an Apple line and loves his job jumped off the building because his girlfriend dumped him.

In this case it was a waste facility not a production line. And yet AI is trolling for hits by putting Applein the headline and downplaying the other clients.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #12 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

What is Apple's proportion of responsibility here?  Dell and HP sold several times more notebooks than Apple. 

 

Apparently 100% even though it had nothing to do with the production lines

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #13 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

"How dare Apple let this happen. This is entirely their fault."

It's also Apple's fault Praxis exploded. At least 200 Klingons were killed, maybe more. The Klingon High Command would not release numbers.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #14 of 35

Given the scale of these operations, I think accidents are inevitable even with rigerous safety standards. Suggesting Apple could have prevented this is like suggesting the government can eliminate car accidents.

Andrew
Reply
Andrew
Reply
post #15 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post
 
The factory where the incident occurred was previously given a worst-possible "black" rating by the Suzhou Municipal Environmental Protection Bureau.

 

 

Why does Apple choose these sorts of companies to do business with?

 

 Oh yeah, I forgot.  Because they can save a few bucks and make higher profits.  Same old same old.

post #16 of 35
Originally Posted by erann View Post
You are so concerned about Chinese work conditions - why don't you have every day another 273 articles about factory deaths in China. And how about factory deaths in Cambodia, Vietnam, Myanmar, Ivory Cost, Nigeria, Paraguay, Costa Rica, and maybe also USA. Why are you only concerned about China?

 

Because this is an Apple website.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #17 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerrySwitched26 View Post

 

 

Why does Apple choose these sorts of companies to do business with?

 

 Oh yeah, I forgot.  Because they can save a few bucks and make higher profits.  Same old same old.

 

 

How friggin easy it must be to make such a statement when you're not running Apple and not responsible for its profitability, market position, and shareholder expectations. 

post #18 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Because this is an Apple website.

OK, then please show me dependable written evidence that Apple Inc. is responsible for this specific accident and how Apple was involved.

post #19 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerrySwitched26 View Post

Quote:
The factory where the incident occurred was previously given a worst-possible "black" rating by the Suzhou Municipal Environmental Protection Bureau.


Why does Apple choose these sorts of companies to do business with?

 Oh yeah, I forgot.  Because they can save a few bucks and make higher profits.  Same old same old.

So do all the other hardware companies. Are you trying to hold Apple to a higher standard than the others, or is your observation directed at all of them?
post #20 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

"How dare Apple let this happen. This is entirely their fault."

Someone dies, and instead of saying that you somewhat feel bad for what happened, you play the victim card.

 

Actually, shame on all posters. No one said anything against Apple for this, but your behavior is much debatable. 

post #21 of 35
Originally Posted by erann View Post
OK, then please show me dependable written evidence that Apple Inc. is responsible for this specific accident and how Apple was involved.

 

Top of the page. Title of the thread.

 

Originally Posted by ClemyNX View Post
Someone dies, and instead of saying that you somewhat feel bad for what happened, you play the victim card.

 

No, I play the "mock the anti-Apple brigade who will spin this as Apple's responsibility" card.


Edited by Tallest Skil - 7/27/12 at 12:06pm

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #22 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerrySwitched26 View Post


Why does Apple choose these sorts of companies to do business with?

 Oh yeah, I forgot.  Because they can save a few bucks and make higher profits.  Same old same old.

It didn't take long for the trolls to start spinning this as Apple's fault.

Hint: every major electronics supplier uses the same factories - and Apple oversees them better than anyone else (at least according to the suppliers themselves when the suicide issue first broke).

You're free to lobby for all products to be manufactured in the US, but be prepared to pay at least 3 times the price for everything if you were to win.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #23 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

It's also Apple's fault Praxis exploded. At least 200 Klingons were killed, maybe more. The Klingon High Command would not release numbers.


Don't forget SJ
post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

 

 

How friggin easy it must be to make such a statement when you're not running Apple and not responsible for its profitability, market position, and shareholder expectations. 

 

 

Totally easy.  We are in perfect agreement.

post #25 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by astrubhar View Post

Given the scale of these operations, I think accidents are inevitable even with rigerous safety standards. Suggesting Apple could have prevented this is like suggesting the government can eliminate car accidents.

 

That rather over simplifies things.  Yes, it's true that accidents can happen even with rigorous safety standards, but at the same time, one thing that can help reduce safety incidents is spending enough money on accident prevention.

 

What we are all a part of, is a quest to continually have "things" for less and less money, and while it shouldn't, spending on safety is an area that companies will cut back on, in the absence of any oversight.  Ultimately, that is one reason Chinese manufacturers can be cheaper than US counterparts - enforced safety standards are higher in the US (and even higher in Europe).

 

This is not something to blame Apple for over any other manufacturer.  We all need to accept that if we want our devices to cost as little as they do, in some places, corners will be cut, and people will get hurt.  We should also remember that while we attempt to push blame away from ourselves and the system we benefit from, our favorite companies etc. a person died here.  Their family will be distraught.  And that is incredibly sad.

post #26 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post


So do all the other hardware companies. Are you trying to hold Apple to a higher standard than the others, or is your observation directed at all of them?

 

 

My observation was directed at Apple.  The culpability is shared by most all of the multinational mega-corporations.

post #27 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


It's also Apple's fault Praxis exploded. At least 200 Klingons were killed, maybe more. The Klingon High Command would not release numbers.

 

This is total BS.  Even though Apple has never released the official numbers, everyone knows that the number of dead from the Praxis incident were in the thousands.  Only a die-hard Apple fanboy would try to maintain that a mere 200 Klingons died.  

 

Take the wool off your eyes people!  The fact is Apple doesn't care about it's Klingon workers despite all the propaganda the high command puts out.  

All they are interested in is profit, and they will blow up as many moons as it takes to get there.  


Edited by Gazoobee - 7/27/12 at 12:39pm
post #28 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerrySwitched26 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

So do all the other hardware companies. Are you trying to hold Apple to a higher standard than the others, or is your observation directed at all of them?


My observation was directed at Apple.  The culpability is shared by most all of the multinational mega-corporations.

I agree that they all should try to improve the situation. My impression has been that Apple have tried somewhat harder than most, for which I'm inclined to give them some credit.
post #29 of 35

Let's not forget that the suicide rate at that Foxconn factory is several times less that the suicide rate in the general population in the USA. The question we should be asking is, "How did Foxconn manage to get the suicide rate so low?"

 

For reference, see:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_suicide_rate

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foxconn_suicides

post #30 of 35

This is a pretty sad story, lets hope they put some more safety measures in place to prevent this from happening again.

post #31 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

Actually you are just making that up about it being "only for trivial things."

You sound way oversensitive to me, but possibly you are one of those that "doesn't like to be judged" as well?   

 

Damn, I wish we could still use smiley's here!  

If ever there was a post that deserved a :rolleyes: yours it it. 

Sure, it's subjective, but if you put it in sentences like "a handful of kids died in a school bus accident" it amplifies how the inaccuracy of the word seems disrespectful. The connotation can be that the number doesn't matter, it was a small and insignificant amount of kids that died on the school bus. It just rubbed me the wrong way.

 

As I suggested in my post, my perception is that Apple is working hard to be an example of excellence when it comes to responsibility towards its suppliers. I'm not saying it's practical to prevent every accident or every abuse of workers in any part of the world. Maybe the idea that no one should die in a factory making an item of convenience is a bit dramatic. People die in the workplace doing even more mundane things that disposing of waste from a MacBook and it's simply an accident. Doesn't mean it doesn't suck.

post #32 of 35

Show some respect. Some people on here disgust me.

post #33 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

Show some respect. Some people on here disgust me.

 

Good.

 

Now you can go away.

Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #34 of 35

"Wen, did you remember to close the number 4 valve?"

"The what?"

post #35 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerrySwitched26 View Post

 

 

Why does Apple choose these sorts of companies to do business with?

 

Actually in some cases it has little to do with the money issue and more about the fact that that company is the best at what Apple (and every other tech company) needs done. And/or has complete and exclusive access to some tech or rare metal that the companies need. 

 

The bigger issue is how Apple is pushed by the press etc as if they are responsible for cleaning up all messes, many of which have nothing to do with them directly, but Dell etc get a pass. A fire breaks out in a building making Acer notebooks and the press still puts up headlines like "Fire at Apple Supplier kills 12, maims 200" and in the article they 'clarify' (somewhat) that the fire was at a building operated by X company of which Apple is one client. Without mentioning that the building in question had nothing to do with Apple and was even at a totally different site than all the Apple stuff is done. 

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › 1 killed, 4 injured in chlorine gas leak at Apple supplier Catcher