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Low-end Retina MacBook Pro now available with 512GB, 768GB drives

post #1 of 53
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Apple's base model MacBook Pro with Retina display can now be custom built with solid-state hard drives of 512 and 768 gigabytes.

The new build-to-order configurations first appeared in Apple's online store on Wednesday, when they were noticed by MacRumors. Users who select the low-end 2.3-gigahertz quad-core Intel Core i7 processor can have a 512-gigabyte flash storage drive for an additional $500, or 768 gigabytes for an extra $1,000.

In addition, users can also choose to upgrade the base model to a faster 2.6-gigahertz quad-core Intel Core i7 chip for an extra $100. Previously, that chip was only available with a 512-gigabyte flash storage drive for $600 more than the base price of $2,199.

Users can also upgrade the processor to a 2.7-gigahertz quad-core Intel Core i7 processor for $350. Build-to-order configurations also come with 16 gigabytes of 1600MHz DDR3L SDRAM for an extra $200.

Shipping times for the new MacBook Pro with Retina display remain estimated at one to two weeks as Apple works to catch up with demand for its latest notebook computer.

MacBook


The 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display can also be found in standard configurations from third-party resellers. It is available with 8 or 16 gigabytes of RAM and a 256-gigabyte solid-state drive with the 2.3-gigahertz processor, while the 2.6- and 2.7-gigahertz configurations come with 512 gigabytes of storage. Prices from resellers can be found in AppleInsider's Mac Price Guide, included below:
post #2 of 53
Well, I like that the BTO option is there on the entry-level model, but I didn't realize it would cost that much.
post #3 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigBillyGoatGruff View Post

Well, I like that the BTO option is there on the entry-level model, but I didn't realize it would cost that much.

What did you think it would cost?
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post #4 of 53
If anyone can drive down costs of SSD Apple can by adoption on this scale.

I installed SSD as my boot drive in a 2010 MBP i7 (Replaced the optical, added Trim Enabler) and it is like using an iPad now for speed, it totally shocked me how fast it is now. HDs are the new floppy, they have to go!
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post #5 of 53

Why would I want to buy a lower end Retina Macbook with soldered RAM that I can't upgrade later? Such a configuration feels like a big win for Apple, but not for the consumer. 

post #6 of 53
Originally Posted by tikiman View Post
Why would I want to buy a lower end Retina Macbook with soldered RAM that I can't upgrade later?

 

Because you're buying the RAM upgrades at purchase?

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post #7 of 53

It looks like the SSD upgrades aren't the only thing new to the lower-priced option—the 1GB GT650M used to be relegated to the 2.7GHz model, but is now standard on all Retina Display models:

 

 

700

post #8 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avelino Maestas View Post

It looks like the SSD upgrades aren't the only thing new to the lower-priced option—the 1GB GT650M used to be relegated to the 2.7GHz model, but is now standard on all Retina Display models:

 

 

700


Now that is big news.

 

Edit: My mistake. It appears the lower-end model has always come with that GPU. Nothing new to see here.


Edited by Smiles77 - 8/1/12 at 12:34pm
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post #9 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Because you're buying the RAM upgrades at purchase?

 

Right, but that wasn't my point. They have an 8GB and a 16GB option for soldered RAM. Why would I want to take the 8GB? Wouldn't I want to take the highest amount of RAM possible since I'll be stuck with that amount for the life of the product I own and we all know how memory consumption seems to creep up over time?

post #10 of 53

Good to see the usual US -> UK Mark-up applies to the processor upgrades , ie the 2.6Ghz upgrade is $100 which is £100 according to apple

 

Allowing for VAT, this is still a fairly large "Apple tax" for being in the UK, $100 = £64.16 at current exchange rates, add VAT, thats  £76.99, a clear £23 profit for apple

 

Given "Build to orders" are not stocked in the shop, this is a nice little earner for Apple

 

For reference the 512MB SSD, its $500 --> £400 ($500  = £320.77, add VAT = £384.92, a profit of £15)

 

Still, I'm happy we finally get some custom options ... though I'd preferr the 500MB SSD to be a lot cheaper (£200/$200 would have been a nice uplift from the base price)

post #11 of 53
Is the 2.3GHZ, 16GB, 256GB for $3,004.00 under Apple Education a typo?
post #12 of 53

No, I bought my low-end MBPr on launch day, and I have the GT 650M with 1 gig of ram in mine.

 

700

post #13 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

If anyone can drive down costs of SSD Apple can by adoption on this scale.
I installed SSD as my boot drive in a 2010 MBP i7 (Replaced the optical, added Trim Enabler) and it is like using an iPad now for speed, it totally shocked me how fast it is now. HDs are the new floppy, they have to go!

I usually don't buy into hype like this, but I agree 100% with this sentiment!

post #14 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smiles77 View Post


Now that is big news.

Can you explain why, for us lay people?

post #15 of 53

Basically, there is no need for a pre-configured "high end" model anymore, at a quick glance it looks like the upgrade options come at the same price as the faster model costs. Or am I missing some important difference?

post #16 of 53

I haven't bought one yet, but when they came out I was sad because I don't need the extra processing but wanted the extra graphics oomph. The Apple website where I pulled the earlier image still says this: 

 

 

 

1000

 

But I'm glad you got hooked up. 

post #17 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigBillyGoatGruff View Post

Well, I like that the BTO option is there on the entry-level model, but I didn't realize it would cost that much.

It shouldn't really cost that much but for some reason Apple don't deduct the cost of parts they take out to do the upgrade. $500 is a good price for 512GB as that's less than $1/GB and even some of the cheapest SSDs aren't much less:

http://www.amazon.com/Crucial-2-5-Inch-Desktop-Install-CT512M4SSD2BAA/dp/B005V19AG8/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1343835507&sr=8-5&keywords=crucial+v4

but the machine ships with 256GB so the upgrade is really $500 for 256GB, which is quite expensive. They should really be able to offer the 512GB upgrade for $300. It's interesting that they can even offer a 768GB option - that's on a blade form factor. Even 2.5" drive manufacturers tend not to go that high and when they do, they cost loads:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227797&Tpk=ocz%20octane%201tb
post #18 of 53

I was more than ready to embrace a retina display for iPhone and iPad. I really have no desire to have a retina display iMac or MacBook Air though. I am more than satisfied with the resolution of my desktop and laptop for now. 

post #19 of 53
I'm glad they changed this. System speed and system capacity don't seem to scale the same way. But Apple would know this so why the change now? I wonder if they simply didn't have the supply before they put it with the high-end model to help push those sales with the BTO SSD cards.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

It shouldn't really cost that much but for some reason Apple don't deduct the cost of parts they take out to do the upgrade. $500 is a good price for 512GB as that's less than $1/GB and even some of the cheapest SSDs aren't much less:
http://www.amazon.com/Crucial-2-5-Inch-Desktop-Install-CT512M4SSD2BAA/dp/B005V19AG8/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1343835507&sr=8-5&keywords=crucial+v4
but the machine ships with 256GB so the upgrade is really $500 for 256GB, which is quite expensive. They should really be able to offer the 512GB upgrade for $300. It's interesting that they can even offer a 768GB option - that's on a blade form factor. Even 2.5" drive manufacturers tend not to go that high and when they do, they cost loads:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227797&Tpk=ocz%20octane%201tb

Is the price difference for 256GB and 512GB really linear in this case? I don't know if they have the room to use double the chips which would make it linear but if they have to use denser chips for that setup the cost per GB change will be unbalanced for Apple.

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post #20 of 53

Why should it cost $50 less ($60 less in the education store) to upgrade a low-end configuration than to start with the better-configured system?

post #21 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by lws View Post

Basically, there is no need for a pre-configured "high end" model anymore, at a quick glance it looks like the upgrade options come at the same price as the faster model costs. Or am I missing some important difference?

 

Answering my own question: The prices are indeed the same, but the store websites for BTO for both models look slightly different and, I dare say, better for the "high end" model.

 

Observe!

 

 

400   vs   400

 

Look at the far right column and the top column that lets you select from the categories (MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, ...)

 

/sarcasm

post #22 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Can you explain why, for us lay people?

 

The GT 650M is a mid-range GPU; not sure i would label the news as huge because the MacBook Pro line is high-end, relatively speaking.

post #23 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post

Why should it cost $50 less ($60 less in the education store) to upgrade a low-end configuration than to start with the better-configured system?

I noticed this last night also! To build the same  system starting with the low end model it is cheaper! This is clearly a mistake on their part that won't last long.

post #24 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by tikiman View Post

 

Right, but that wasn't my point. They have an 8GB and a 16GB option for soldered RAM. Why would I want to take the 8GB? Wouldn't I want to take the highest amount of RAM possible since I'll be stuck with that amount for the life of the product I own and we all know how memory consumption seems to creep up over time?

you can upgrade the RAM yourself...there are videos on youtube that show you how..do not buy the upgrade from Apple because they charge you a high premium 

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post #25 of 53

Wanted to check out all these wrinkles - wouldn't be the first time that configuration upgrade pricing for the basic model didn't quite match the initial price of the premium model,

so I'm not so sure they will correct it,

but, right now, the Store seems to be flummoxed - can't see configure pages because the group product pages have so select buttons, at the moment.

 

Or, I get an "Oops" message from the store.

Otherwise, I might have thought it was one of the many 'blessings' of Safari 6...

post #26 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by daylove22 View Post

you can upgrade the RAM yourself...there are videos on youtube that show you how..do not buy the upgrade from Apple because they charge you a high premium 
Really....
Please do some fact checking.
post #27 of 53
Originally Posted by daylove22 View Post
you can upgrade the RAM yourself…

 

No, you can't.

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post #28 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by daylove22 View Post

you can upgrade the RAM yourself...there are videos on youtube that show you how..do not buy the upgrade from Apple because they charge you a high premium 

You can with the non-retina Macbook Pros but you cannot upgrade anything in the Retina Macbook Pro. In the Retina MBP everything, including the RAM, is soldered to the Logic Board (aka motherboard).

 

Edit: It seems the SSD is not soldered but uses proprietary connector.


Edited by NasserAE - 8/1/12 at 11:25am
post #29 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

If anyone can drive down costs of SSD Apple can by adoption on this scale.
I installed SSD as my boot drive in a 2010 MBP i7 (Replaced the optical, added Trim Enabler) and it is like using an iPad now for speed, it totally shocked me how fast it is now. HDs are the new floppy, they have to go!

I did replace my MBP HDD with SSD few weeks ago as well. I was setting up a new MBP with HDD for a family member (upgrade to ML and add other apps). The process was painfully slow compared to my MBP with SSD! Never going back to HDD again :)

post #30 of 53
Originally Posted by zunx View Post
The matte (antiglare) option has been added now to the new MacBook Pro 13-inch, but not to the MacBook Pro Retina. No matte, no purchase, because this is a serious health and productivity issue for many people. MacMatte.

 

Blah blah, FUD, lies, etc.

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post #31 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xian Zhu Xuande View Post


What did you think it would cost?

My (Wall Street) Powerbook G3 250 (mhz) configured with a 13-inch  display (1024x768), 32mb RAM, and a 2GB HD (two!) cost me around $4000.- in 1988 which would be the approximate equivalent to 5 grand today. 

Someone will be able to be more exact but bang for buck there's never been a better time than right now! 

;-)

post #32 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

The matte (antiglare) option has been added now to the new MacBook Pro 13-inch, but not to the MacBook Pro Retina. No matte, no purchase, because this is a serious health and productivity issue for many people. MacMatte.

BTW - Where do you see this? I tried to look at store.apple.com/us but I can't find antiglare for the MBP13?

post #33 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by tikiman View Post

Why would I want to buy a lower end Retina Macbook with soldered RAM that I can't upgrade later? Such a configuration feels like a big win for Apple, but not for the consumer. 


Because most people never upgrade the hardware in their laptop after purchase.  You are in a very, very small minority.  It's neither a win, nor a loss for the consumer.  Like it or not, soldering the ram, ssd chips increases reliability.  It also makes for a lighter and thinner footprint since Apple doesn't have to install components which allows for ram cards, or SSD hookups.

They still sell the non-Retina MBP that lets you do that.  So buy one while you still can if you feel the need.  I would bet that most people will consider it a non-issue and that older MBP will be no longer available within a year.

I ordered a low-end MBP with 16GB Ram.  Case closed.  Sure I can get the memory elsewhere for cheaper, I don't want the headaches of trying to install it, I like the thinner profile provided with soldered chips, and I know I will never open the case to bump anything up.  Most consumers will think the exact same way.  They won't even care (or know) that the chips are soldered since they will never upgrade anything anyways.


Edited by sflocal - 8/1/12 at 12:49pm
post #34 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

My (Wall Street) Powerbook G3 250 (mhz) configured with a 13-inch  display (1024x768), 32mb RAM, and a 2GB HD (two!) cost me around $4000.- in 1988 which would be the approximate equivalent to 5 grand today. 
Someone will be able to be more exact but bang for buck there's never been a better time than right now! 
;-)

$4,000 in 1988 was the equivalent of nearly $7300 in 2010 (the most recent year available on this particular calculator):
http://www.westegg.com/inflation/infl.cgi
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post #35 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


$4,000 in 1988 was the equivalent of nearly $7300 in 2010 (the most recent year available on this particular calculator):
http://www.westegg.com/inflation/infl.cgi

Really? Luckily my insurance company paid for that lovely machine. For me to pay 7 grand for a computer today would be unthinkable. 

 

Just noticed (and so should you have!) - the G3 Powerbook came out in 98, not 88 - according to the westegg website the equivalent would in fact be 5300.

post #36 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by emacs72 View Post

 

The GT 650M is a mid-range GPU; not sure i would label the news as huge because the MacBook Pro line is high-end, relatively speaking.

The reason I brought this up was, I have the RMBP on order from about two weeks ago (8GB/512GB). I wonder if I should cancel and reorder.

post #37 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by tikiman View Post

Why would I want to buy a lower end Retina Macbook with soldered RAM that I can't upgrade later? Such a configuration feels like a big win for Apple, but not for the consumer. 

 

Not sure why YOU would. But apparently, many indeed would, as evidenced by Apple's trouble in fulfilling demand for this notebook. I don't remember the last time I updated RAM in any computer, times have changed, and its not as necessary as it once was. Yes, reuirements change over time, but even the lowest end model has 8GB of RAM which I think for 95% of people would be more than sufficient for a few years to come. I do absolutely everything on my Macbook Air, including heavy design work, and so far 4GB has handled everything incredibly well. You're really generalizing when you state this is bad for the consumer, the pros of having a thinner/lighter/more reliable soldered RAM for every single person that buys the laptop seems to outweigh the cons of a very small percentage of purchasers wanting to up the RAM down the line. Also, I'd think those who put down that kind of money on a MBP would be making an educated decision about what they need and don't need. 


Edited by Slurpy - 8/1/12 at 2:04pm
post #38 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

The matte (antiglare) option has been added now to the new MacBook Pro 13-inch, but not to the MacBook Pro Retina. No matte, no purchase, because this is a serious health and productivity issue for many people. MacMatte.

I don't think they'll add an anti-glare option because the Retina model has reduced the glare to the point that it won't be distracting:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikbnvFsi6bc

You can see the difference is huge here, even on pure black, which is where it is the worst:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=v_RNoWmvOIU#t=235s
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=v_RNoWmvOIU#t=303s

While there are still some reflections, they are very dull and it's pretty much the best compromise between the two they can make. I've long been against glossy displays but I'd have no problems with a Retina MBP.
post #39 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


I don't think they'll add an anti-glare option because the Retina model has reduced the glare to the point that it won't be distracting:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikbnvFsi6bc
You can see the difference is huge here, even on pure black, which is where it is the worst:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=v_RNoWmvOIU#t=235s
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=v_RNoWmvOIU#t=303s
While there are still some reflections, they are very dull and it's pretty much the best compromise between the two they can make. I've long been against glossy displays but I'd have no problems with a Retina MBP.

Agreed - I always paid the extra $50 for matte, and clearly the Retina is MORE glossy than the older anti-glare option - true - but it aint much, and i find the Retina to be a very good compromise between the older glossy and matte. Im using it now in a car, IN bright sunshine - 

post #40 of 53

200 bucks for an additional 8 gigs of ram, which can be purchased from Newegg for 43 dollars right now? That's insane, even for Apple's standards.

 

Apple can keep their Retina display nonsense, just stick the higher resolution screen that the 13" MBA ships with into the 13" MBP (or at least give me the damn option to upgrade at purchase) and I'd be happy. I'm getting ready to upgrade from a 2009 MBP, and as much as I love that higher resolution screen in the MBA, the shallow keyboard would annoy the hell out of me if I had to type on it on a daily basis.

 

Eh, maybe I'll just hold off and wait to see if they release a thinner 13" MBP with the higher res screen in the fall like rumors say they will. Fingers crossed it won't be a bloated overpriced glued down piece of proprietary junk the 15" model turned out to be.

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