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Scott Forstall describes iOS development, challenges in Samsung trial

post #1 of 66
Thread Starter 
Following Apple's marketing chief Phil Schiller, iOS head Scott Forstall to the stand to testify in the Samsung patent infringement trial.

Forstall introduced himself as managing iOS software for Apple, "the operating system that runs all iPhones, iPad and iPod Touch," as well as user interface design for both iOS devices and Macs.

He reports to the company's chief executive Tim Cook as serves as a member of the Executive Team, with 1,000 people directly reporting to him.

Forstall noted that he completed his undergrad and grad studies at Stanford University, earning a degree in symbolic systems, the intersection of computer science and linguistics, and a masters degree in artificial intelligence.

He reported that he first met Steve Jobs in 1992 at an initial interview at NeXT, describing Jobs as walking into his interview session, taking over the conversation, then informing him that he could expect a job offer from NeXT, and that NeXT expected him to accept it.

Forstall followed Jobs to Apple after its acquisition of NeXT in 1997. Through 2004, Forstall noted that he managed OS software in the transition of NeXT's technology to Mac OS X.

"I was one of the people who started the project and created a piece of it. Over time, I was responsible for more and more pieces," Forstall said, noting that he took over the whole OS.

Forstall said that the OS team at Apple "wanted an operating system that could last for another 20 years," noting that the Classic Mac OS Apple had during the 1990s "didn?t have those legs."

The development of iPhone & iPad

Asked by Apple's attorney to discuss the development of the iPhone and iPad, Forstall stated, "In 2003, we had built all these great Macs and laptops and we started asking ourselves what comes next. One thought we settled on was a tablet. We settled pretty quickly if we could investigate doing that with a touchscreen, so we started investigating and building prototypes."

Forstall added, "In 2004, I remember sitting with Steve [Jobs] and saying we all hated our cell phones. We were asking ourselves: could we use the technology we were using with touch and use that same technology for phone. Something that would fit in your pocket.

"I'll never forget," Forstall noted, "we took that tablet and built a small scrolling list. On the tablet, we were doing pinch and zoom. So we built a small list to scroll on contacts and then you could tap on it to call. We realized that a touchscreen that was the size that would fit in your pocket would be perfect for the phone. So in 2004, we switched over from developing a tablet to developing the iPhone."

Apple's Purple Project

Describing his role in developing the iPhone, Forstall stated, "in 2004, when we decided to build the iPhone, Steve knew that there would need to be a lot of different groups."

Forstall related that he was be responsible for building the software team. Jobs told him he couldn?t hire anyone from outside of Apple to work on the interface, but he could bring in anyone from within the company to work on the iPhone team.

"That was quite a challenge," Forstall said. "What I did was find people who were true superstars of the company, amazing engineers, bring them into my office and say, ?you?re a superstar in your current role. I have an other offer, another option. We?re starting a new project. It?s so secret I can?t tell you what that project is. I can?t tell you who you will work for. What I can tell you is if you chose this new role, you?re going to work hard, give up nights, work weekends for years."

Forstall added, ?we wanted to build a phone for ourselves. A phone that we really love. A computer in your pocket. We wanted to bring out something great without anyone else finding out what we?re doing so they wouldn?t leak it."

Asked if he was confidence his team would succeed, Forstall answered, "not at all."

Forstall described the iPhone team working in a locked down floor on the Apple campus, where all doors were secured with badge readers and activity was monitored by cameras. The iPhone project was given the code name Purple, so the building was called the "purple dorm."

"People were there all the time. It smelled like pizza," he said. Alluding to the movie "Fight Club," Forstall said, "The first rule of the Purple Project is you don't talk about the Purple Project."

Technological challenges of the iPhone

Forstall noted that a lot of the iPhone's innovation was related to the iPhone?s touchscreen, particularly its use of a capacitive touchscreen rather than the more commonly used resistive sensors designed to be used with a stylus.
Other challenges related to the fact that Apple software had historically been designed around the keyboard and the mouse.

"Every single part of the design had to be rethought for touch," Forstall stated. "We started with a brand new user interface. That?s one. Second, we didn?t want to have a physical keyboard on here. If you look back to even 2005 when the engineering team started on this, smartphones all had a physical keyboard. The most popular one at the time was the BlackBerry. People thought we were crazy."

Forstall also noted, "we wanted to give people the entire web, the entire Internet experience. And the Internet is designed for a much larger screen. When a web designer is building a site, they expect a [large] screen like this. We had a small screen. So we wanted to solve the problem of giving people the entire, Internet experience on this device."

Other companies were approaching the web on smartphones using WAP, a technology Forstall described as "a dumbed-down, baby Internet experience."

When asked how much investment went into creating the user interface, Forstall said that the task of building a user interface that could fit into a device one could use with your fingers was "immense."

Forstall noted that he "devoted years of my life to this," and described it as "very, very difficult."

Forstall describes the '163 tap to format patent

Asked about patent '163, which names Forstall as an inventor, he explained that it covers a lot. In browsing the web in a browser like Safari, Forstall explained, there are columns of horizontal stories representing content on web pages. The patent tries to address how to navigate among those stories by responding to user taps and double taps.

The patent describes technology that "makes it real simple for user to move around, navigate around the web site by double tapping on what you see," Forstall explained.

Asked how he developed the ideas, he stated that he devoted a lot of time practicing browsing on early prototypes. He noted that pinching in and out of the stories to get the zoom "just right" took a lot of time. Instead, he decided it would be better for the device handle this automatically: just double tap on the story and have it zoom up and center appropriately.

"The team went back and worked really hard" to figure out how to do that.Asked if the task was challenging, Forstall laughter and said, "understanding that [web page] structure -- and the structure the user cares about -- is part of the challenge."

Asked if this patent represents a "significant feature," Forstall answered, ?Absolutely! I remember what it was like before, during development and after. It allowed me to browse the web much more fluently.

"And we know from our users," Forstall stated, "that browsing the web is one of the things they do on their iPhone. It allows you to have a dramatically better experience."

Apple even created an advertisement based on this zooming feature, Forstall noted, which Apple's legal team subsequently demonstrated to the court.

Forstall's cross examination by Samsung

Samsung's cross examination first asked if Forstall recalled concerns about processor speeds compared with competing smartphones, and if the iPhone development team included looking at competitor's products, including Samsung's. Forstall said he agreed it was acceptable to look at other vendor's products.

Samsung next cited an email circulated between Apple's top executives where Steve Jobs commented on an existing click wheel-based Samsung phone and then stated "this may be our answer, we could put the number pad around our clickwheel." A second email, from Forstall, forwarded a press release for a different Samsung phone.

Asked if these were examples of Apple looking for inspiration at Samsung phones during the development of the iPhone, Forstall answered that he wasn't sure if Jobs was describing an aspect of the phone or referencing his own solution.

In a third Apple email Samsung presented, Forstall was asked if Apple was benchmarking competing phones, including those from Samsung. In reply Forstall noted that Apple was analyzing call performance of a number of phone models and carriers, and that the email was sent from a person who was performing a call drop test.

Forstall also clarified that Apple had acquired a variety of phone models to do feature analysis of how the phones handled calls, not to study their user interface and design. Forstall also noted he was aware that Apple had performed competitive teardowns of other mobile devices on the market.

Samsung's attorney specifically directed attention to Galaxy S features that are not on the iPhone (including Swype text input and aspects of the TouchWiz UI), oddly implying that Apple copied these features after performing a teardown of the unit.

An email circulating between Cook, Forstall and iTunes head Eddy Cue was next presented by Samsung, noting Cue commenting on the Galaxy Tab and stating that there would be a market for smaller 7 inch tablets.

"I believe there will be a 7-inch market and we should do one," Cue said in the email. "I expressed this to Steve several times since Thanksgiving and he seemed very receptive the last time."

Samsung's attorney next asked about how a web page like the New York Times could be an electronic document with other documents embedded in it, apparel referencing Apple's '163 "click to focus" patent. Forstall answered that HTML provides a semantic structure, and that specific regions on the page aren't necessarily documents embedded inside of each other.

The attorney then challenged Forstall to answer whether Apple invented zooming in and out on a touchscreen, a question which Apple's attorneys objected to. The attorney then asked if Apple invented touchscreens, and Forstall answered that he didn't know the extent of Apple's patents and therefore had to answer that he did not know.

Asked if it was acceptable to benchmark other vendor's products, Forstall answered,"it?s fine to benchmark for performance reasons. It?s not ok to copy and rip something off."

Asked if he told anyone at Apple to copy Samsung's designs, Forstall replied, "I never directed anyone to go and copy something from Samsung. We wanted to build something great. There was no reason to look at anything they had done."

The attorney then challenged Forstall with an email from Jobs that was represented to mean he had found something worth copying, to which Forstall disagreed with that interpretation of the email.
post #2 of 66
This is like a book that's writing itself.
post #3 of 66

From Forbes.

 

He’s (Forstall is) asked if he told anyone at Apple to copy from Samsung’s designs.

 

“I never directed anyone to go and copy something from Samsung. We wanted to build something great…There was no reason to look at anything they had done.”

 

Nice one Scott!

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post #4 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by amoradala View Post

From Forbes.

He’s (Forstall is) asked if he told anyone at Apple to copy from Samsung’s designs.


“I never directed anyone to go and copy something from Samsung. We wanted to build something great…There was no reason to look at anything they had done.”


Nice one Scott!
Ooh that's gotta sting!
post #5 of 66

lol, regarding the clickwheel question, Forestall should have added, "Oh, and by the way, since you bring it up, Samsung's clickwheel was in violation of Apple's clickwheel patent, so that too would have represented an example of their company utilizing ideas that weren't theirs to use."

 

BOOM!

 

That would have destroyed them!

post #6 of 66
The most interesting part of this trial is hearing Apple's process for designing something. The amount of time and effort they put into things and the attention to detail. And the fact they were thinking of these things years before the iPhone first came out.

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post #7 of 66
Samsung lawyer asking Samsung witness why phones are rectangular like TV's. *facepalm*
post #8 of 66
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post
Samsung lawyer asking Samsung witness why phones are rectangular like TV's. *facepalm*

 

Can a person be jailed for stupidity?

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post #9 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Samsung lawyer asking Samsung witness why phones are rectangular like TV's. *facepalm*

I think Samsung just went and bought the most expensive lawyer money can buy, and did nothing to check the competence in the tech field.

post #10 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooch View Post

meh. that's about as far i could get in the article before my head exploded as a result of the non-stop parade of grammar and syntax errors.
or as appleinsider would put it: "that i could get Exploders, errors."

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post #11 of 66
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Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

ALL YOUR BASE ARE BELONG TO US.

indeed ... if only that were the reason.
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post #12 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider 
The iPhone project was given the code name Purple, so the building was called the "purple dorm."

"The first rule of the Purple Project is you don't talk about the Purple Project."

I wonder if he got to be called Mr. Purple. He always wanted to be Mr. Purple:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=4W5KhfJHF_4#t=50s
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider 
Asked if he told anyone at Apple to copy Samsung's designs, Forstall replied, "I never directed anyone to go and copy something from Samsung. We wanted to build something great. There was no reason to look at anything they had done."

The attorney then challenged Forstall with an email from Jobs that was represented to mean he had found something worth copying, to which Forstall disagreed with that interpretation of the email.

Good answers from Forstall, I wonder what the email from Jobs said.
post #13 of 66
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post
…I wonder what the email from Jobs said.

 

No.

 

Sent from my iPhone.

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post #14 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

…I wonder what the email from Jobs said.

No.

Sent from my iPhone.

I meant the one where he supposedly suggests he may have found a product to reference.

The more this court case goes on, the more I'm getting the impression these guys aren't really taking things too seriously:

"There’s an issue with the microphones for sidebars and Samsung and Apple have offered to have their own technicians fix it (There’s a lot of laughter in the courtroom over that)."

Some of Samsung's claims are bordering on ridiculous:

"Samsung countered that Apple is doing the stealing and that some of the technology at issue - such as the rounded rectangular designs of smartphones and tablets - has been industry standards for years."
post #15 of 66

I hope all Samsung hardware and software is banned from the marketplace and that they are forced to create something new and unique for both. Stealing all of Apple's work then repackaging it and selling it on cheap phones is wrong.

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post #16 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

Good answers from Forstall, I wonder what the email from Jobs said.

"This may become a talking point used by a Samsung lawyer in a future trial, so I'm setting this up as a blind alley. Be cagey."

 

Cheers

post #17 of 66

I can't see Apple being happy with all these internal design process details, private discussion with SJ, emails, behind the scenes stuff, etc all being publicized. I've gained more insight into Apple's internals these past couple days than I have in years of following them as a company. It just seems so.... odd, for all this stuff to be coming out from these execs from such a secretive company. I can just feel SJ rolling in his grave. 

post #18 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

I can't see Apple being happy with all these internal design process details, private discussion with SJ, emails, behind the scenes stuff, etc all being publicized. I've gained more insight into Apple's internals these past couple days than I have in years of following them as a company. It just seems so.... odd, for all this stuff to be coming out from these execs from such a secretive company. I can just feel SJ rolling in his grave. 

Why would they give a shit? Apple isn't secretive because they are a bunch of paranoid control freaks, they are secretive to protect forthcoming products - this stuff is all in the past.

 

Samsung are so fucked.

post #19 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinney57 View Post

Why would they give a shit? Apple isn't secretive because they are a bunch of paranoid control freaks, they are secretive to protect forthcoming products - this stuff is all in the past.

 

Samsung are so fucked.

 

Uh, no. They're secretive about the past, present, and future, always have been- especially their product development process and methodology. You think they're cool with all the 'Steve Jobs thought a 7" iPad was a great idea', anecdotes? 

post #20 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by amoradala View Post

From Forbes.

 

He’s (Forstall is) asked if he told anyone at Apple to copy from Samsung’s designs.

 

“I never directed anyone to go and copy something from Samsung. We wanted to build something great…There was no reason to look at anything they had done.”

 

Nice one Scott!

Best. Qoute. Ever. I love Scott Forstall!

post #21 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

He reports to the company's chief executive Tim Cook as serves as a member of the Executive Team, with 1,000 people directly reporting to him.

And this (aside from the grammar), I don't believe Forstall has 1000 direct reports. A thousand people working under him I can believe but they aren't all direct reports.

Who writes this stuff?
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post #22 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

Good answers from Forstall, I wonder what the email from Jobs said.

 

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post #23 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

I can't see Apple being happy with all these internal design process details, private discussion with SJ, emails, behind the scenes stuff, etc all being publicized. I've gained more insight into Apple's internals these past couple days than I have in years of following them as a company. It just seems so.... odd, for all this stuff to be coming out from these execs from such a secretive company. I can just feel SJ rolling in his grave. 

Nonsense. Don't you think Steve knew they would need to backup their claim on infringement when this war went to court? edit: EricTheHalfBee sums it up way better here
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooch View Post

i posted a comment earlier, pointing out the first three grammar errors in the article, kind of like this:
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Following Apple's marketing chief Phil Schiller, iOS head Scott Forstall to the stand to testify in the Samsung patent infringement trial.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

He reports to the company's chief executive Tim Cook as serves as a member of the Executive Team, with 1,000 people directly reporting to him.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Asked if he was confidence his team would succeed, Forstall answered, "not at all."

meh. that's about as far i could get in the article before my head exploded as a result of the non-stop parade of grammar and syntax errors.

or as appleinsider would put it: "that i could get Exploders, errors.".

the comment has since been deleted.

is appleinsider now censoring its critics, mild and true as they might be? it has a lot of work to do then, because i'm not the only one pointing out the numerous syntax and grammar errors in this, uh, thing.

can anyone hazard a guess as to why my comment was summarily deleted?

Deleted? Wow. Glad to be able to read it now. Still, wow AI. If someone posts a comment you'd think that person is the owner of those words, but AI thinks it was given to them when clicking on the summit button? Strikes me as 'odd'.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IHateScreenNames View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

He reports to the company's chief executive Tim Cook as serves as a member of the Executive Team, with 1,000 people directly reporting to him.

And this (aside from the grammar), I don't believe Forstall has 1000 direct reports. A thousand people working under him I can believe but they aren't all direct reports.

Who writes this stuff?

The size of his team I absolutely believe. He's got the Siri team, which is the largest team within Apple. And of course he's got managers between him and these 1,000 people otherwise he'd do nothing but granting sick leave and all that crap management stuff.
Edited by PhilBoogie - 8/3/12 at 11:43pm
post #24 of 66

If Jobs ever had said there might be something worth copying, IF, and they didn't actual copy anything, why ask? I think Samsung is trying to confuse the jury. What was Samnsung doing before than iPhone and iOS that was even worth stealing?

post #25 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post

Best. Qoute. Ever. I love Scott Forstall!

That was a great slam on Samsung!

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post #26 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

The most interesting part of this trial is hearing Apple's process for designing something. The amount of time and effort they put into things and the attention to detail. And the fact they were thinking of these things years before the iPhone first came out.

 

I agree!  I really want to hear what Samsung's process is. 
 
post #27 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by IHateScreenNames View Post

And this (aside from the grammar), I don't believe Forstall has 1000 direct reports. A thousand people working under him I can believe but they aren't all direct reports.
Who writes this stuff?
Yeah I wondered about this too as it was reported elsewhere like this. I'm sure there are some VP's or middle managers who report directly to him who these 1'000 or so people report up through.
post #28 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Nonsense. Don't you think Steve knew they would need to backup their claim on infringement when this war went to court? edit: EricTheHalfBee sums it up way better here
Deleted? Wow. Glad to be able to read it now. Still, wow AI. If someone posts a comment you'd think that person is the owner of those words, but AI thinks it was given to them when clicking on the summit button? Strikes me as 'odd'.
The size of his team I absolutely believe. He's got the Siri team, which is the largest team within Apple. And of course he's got managers between him and these 1,000 people otherwise he'd do nothing but granting sick leave and all that crap management stuff.
If he has 1,000 people working on Siri why is it still beta and why does it still suck?
post #29 of 66
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post
If he has 1,000 people working on Siri why is it still beta and why does it still suck?

 

Sarcasm, right?

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post #30 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooch 
deleted. twice now.

Before you make a 3rd attempt, there's no conspiracy here - grammar and spelling reports have nothing to do with the topic. They just fill up the thread with noise. Go to any mainstream online news publication and you will find spelling and grammar errors here and there. It's the nature of disposable online news. There will be another story tomorrow with a new set of mistakes. If the news the article is meant to deliver is delivered then it has served its purpose. The editor might not even read the thread so the mistakes won't be corrected anyway. If you feel there should be better proof-reading in general, let them know in the feedback forum.
Quote:
Originally Posted by genovelle 
I agree! I really want to hear what Samsung's process is.

I think we know what their process is now.
post #31 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by amoradala View Post

From Forbes.

 

He’s (Forstall is) asked if he told anyone at Apple to copy from Samsung’s designs.

 

“I never directed anyone to go and copy something from Samsung. We wanted to build something great…There was no reason to look at anything they had done.”

 

Nice one Scott!

 

Forstall for CEO.   ;)

post #32 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


If he has 1,000 people working on Siri why is it still beta and why does it still suck?

 

Several thousand people working at RIM. Why, after several years of experiencing new market realities do they still have their heads up their ass and letting their platform die?

 

Several thousand people working at Nokia. Why, after several years of experiencing new market realities do they still have their heads up their ass and letting their platform die?

 

Several thousand people working at Microsoft. Windows Phone. No one cares. 

 

Several thousand people working at Microsoft. Surface and Windows 8.  HUH???

 

Several thousand people working at HTC. The company is in a flat spin. "We just have a problem with execution and . . . and . . . *insert corporate gobbledygook*

 

Several thousand people working at HP. Touchpad platfrom = dead. 

 

Apple's biggest problem? Siri has to study a little more. 

 

 

 

We're getting spoiled by Apple. Others can barely get a friggin platform off the ground. 

 

Perspective. 

post #33 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

I can't see Apple being happy with all these internal design process details, private discussion with SJ, emails, behind the scenes stuff, etc all being publicized. I've gained more insight into Apple's internals these past couple days than I have in years of following them as a company. It just seems so.... odd, for all this stuff to be coming out from these execs from such a secretive company. I can just feel SJ rolling in his grave. 

They (Apple) obviously feel the benefit of winning this case far outweighs the cost of revealing so much about how they work. I tend to agree.
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post #34 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmarcoot View Post

If Jobs ever had said there might be something worth copying, IF, and they didn't actual copy anything, why ask? I think Samsung is trying to confuse the jury. What was Samnsung doing before than iPhone and iOS that was even worth stealing?

How about the cell phone and how it works? Samsung made many advancements in that area, if it weren't for Samsung then Apple wouldn't have been able o make a phone at all. I have myself posted pics of the LG Prada and the F700 but not to accuse Apple of copying but to show that other manufacturers were thinking along the same lines that touch screen devices were the future. They just didn't come out with a product as refined or as useful as the iPhone, but they were on the right track.
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post #35 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

...the F700 but not to accuse Apple of copying but to show that other manufacturers were thinking along the same lines that touch screen devices were the future...

 

This F700:-

 

 

700

 

If at the time of working on the F700, Samsung thought "touch screen phones were the future", why does it have a slide out keyboard?

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post #36 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

 

This F700:-

 

 

700

 

If at the time of working on the F700, Samsung thought "touch screen phones were the future", why does it have a slide out keyboard?

 I searched on this a while back. The drivers/feedback weren't perfect at the time. I thought the original iphone was a bit annoying too when it came to things like texting. it has improved considerably. With something where they were obviously testing the market by including a touch screen as it was becoming feasible in terms of construction costs, this shouldn't surprise you. Other brands are a lot more cautious than Apple. Quite often even if they do something nice, the tech blogs will point out the changes in a negative way. This has happened with a few notebooks and things in the past. Anyway you're probably already aware of all of this, so there's really no need to play dumb. Note that Apple's original suit included claims against this phone too. They dropped them later.

post #37 of 66
Everything
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

This F700:-




If at the time of working on the F700, Samsung thought "touch screen phones were the future", why does it have a slide out keyboard?

There are still plenty of touchscreen phones with slide out keyboards, it doesn't take away from the on screen's keyboard usefulness. Look at the first Droid, it had a slide out keyboard. Now I ask you, if the SGS 2 had a slide out keyboard would you say "well it looks nothing like an iphone because of it"? If the argument is good one way it should be good the other way as well.
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post #38 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Everything
There are still plenty of touchscreen phones with slide out keyboards, it doesn't take away from the on screen's keyboard usefulness. Look at the first Droid, it had a slide out keyboard. Now I ask you, if the SGS 2 had a slide out keyboard would you say "well it looks nothing like an iphone because of it"? If the argument is good one way it should be good the other way as well.

It's a moot point.

Apple claimed the F700 as prior art when they applied for their design patent. Since the patent office had access to that prior art before granting Apple the patent, it's almost impossible to use the F700 as prior art to invalidate the patent.
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Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #39 of 66

Wow, they are really getting personal on the attacks. haha. I wonder how samsung can ever defend against Apple employees who were gifted such golden tongues?

post #40 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by imbrucewayne View Post

Wow, they are really getting personal on the attacks. haha. I wonder how samsung can ever defend against Apple employees who were gifted such golden tongues?

They could always try to use evidence - if they hadn't destroyed most of it. /s
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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