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Apple removes YouTube app from iOS with beta 4 release of iOS 6 [u]

post #1 of 142
Thread Starter 
Apple on Monday afternoon released the 4th beta of iOS 6 to developers and in the process appears to have nixed the inclusion of the once-standard YouTube app in what appears to be an escalation of tensions between the company and rival Google.

The release originally began cropping up as an over-the-air update at around 1:00 p.m. Eastern but was mislabeled as beta 3 and temporarily removed. As of press time, Apple has re-issued the beta with the appropriate labeling.

Upon installing the release, people familiar with the software confirm that the Apple-developed YouTube app is no longer part of the distribution -- potentially a sign of increased tensions between the two companies which are facing off against each other in both the mobile and connected television segments.

Google owns YouTube.

Update: in a statement issued to Reuters Apple said:

Our license to include the YouTube app in iOS has ended, customers can use YouTube in the Safari browser and Google is working on a new YouTube app to be on the App Store.





Apple's partnerships with Google to work around Flash

At the release of the original iPhone in 2007, Apple partnered with Google to develop a native, bundled YouTube app for the iPhone that would allow users to access Google's vast library of user-created videos.

Without work on Google's side to make those videos available using the open H.264 codec, its YouTube videos would not have worked with the iPhone because Google's player and distribution formats were tied to Adobe Flash, a software platform that wasn't functional on smartphones and wouldn't be made available by Adobe in a partially-usable form until 2010, and then only on brand new hardware powerful enough to run it.

Because of the proprietary nature of Flash, Apple would have been severely constrained in any of its efforts to create an in-house compatibility layer to support it. It would also have required significant resources and introduced new limitations on Apple's iOS.

Rather than taking on the nearly impossible task of supporting Flash on 2007-era mobile devices, Apple decided to instead provide alternative workarounds that minimized the feature loss of not having Flash available.

Because the primary valuable uses of Flash revolved around simple web site animations and video playback, Apple focused on providing rich support for advanced HTML techniques and began promoting Flash-free, direct H.264 video playback, two features that became prominent capabilities of HTML 5.

After initially supporting YouTube playback on the iPhone, Apple TV and later the iPad by converting its huge library to enable raw H.264 video downloads, Google began an attack on the H.264 standard because it incorporated licensed technologies that put it at odds with free software advocates in the open source community, particularly Mozilla.

Google acquired its own proprietary codec (renaming it WebM) and made the specification "open" in the sense of requiring no licensing fees to use it. However, the MPEG Licensing Authority, the standards body behind H.264, insisted that Google's new specification infringed upon the technical patent portfolio already developed by the global community for H.264.

Concerns around the legal legitimacy and infringement risks of Google's own WebM codec, as well as the codec's serious technical shortcomings (including a lack of mobile hardware acceleration support) has caused it to fail to gain any serious traction in the market since, even despite Google's removal of H.264 playback support from its Chrome web browser.

Over the last five years, Apple's support for HTML 5 and H.264 video has made both open standards (one freely licensed, the other requiring licensing from the MPEG LA) the new foundations of web development. This is particularly the case in the global market for mobile devices, about half of which are now produced by Apple.

Adobe has canceled Flash development on mobile devices, and its middleware platform is now becoming increasingly irrelevant on the web as HTML 5 takes over more and more features formerly served by Flash. After YouTube's switch to serving H.264, other prominent video distributors followed suit, to the point where most of the world's web videos do not require Flash to work, an unbelievable scenario back in 2007.

At this point, iOS doesn't need a special app to access YouTube videos, and as Apple indicated in its comment to the media, Google has terminated its license to access YouTube videos natively, rather than via Google's website.

Apple evicts Google from iOS 6

While Apple no longer needs to direct attention to YouTube videos in a special iOS app, the removal of its YouTube app sends a strong message when combined with other, related efforts Apple has made to exclude Google from its once intimate position on Apple's iOS platform.

New "Share Sheets" Apple introduced for iOS 6 and this summer's OS X Mountain Lion specifically support Google's YouTube competitor site Vimeo (shown below), but not YouTube.



Apple has also added support for Yahoo's Flickr photo site but not Google's Picassa, and has added or announced new social link features for Twitter and Facebook, but conspicuously not Google's own competing services Buzz and Google+.

One of the most significant features of iOS 6 is Apple's new Maps, which erases its former support for Google's mapping services and establishes Apple's own in-house services in their place.

Apple's new Maps app for iOS 6 (below) similarly avoids any support for Google's Places, instead partnering with Yelp, and makes no effort to incorporate Google's Latitude location sharing, having introduced Apple's own device location and Find My Friends services tied to iCloud.



Apple's removal or lack of support for Google's services (particularly given the support of its competitor's) is apparently an intentional distancing effort Apple has initiated as a response to Google's increasingly intense competitive efforts, which include Google's Android software platform, legal efforts to challenge Apple's infringement complaints with offensive use of standards essential patents through Google's new Motorola subsidiary, and most recently, efforts to take on the iPad and Apple TV with Google-branded hardware devices.
post #2 of 142

New feature: Delete YouTube

post #3 of 142

It isn't a very useful application anyway.  Google should at least be paying for that application placement.  Maybe Apple has something better in mind.

post #4 of 142
Makes sense to me. Google can just upload it to the app store. All the web links seem to take you to a mobile web version now anyway. No need for this to be built-in.
post #5 of 142

It sucked anyway. 

 

Just bookmark it and drag it out to your screen.

post #6 of 142

According to Macrumors, Apple has released a statement saying that their license with Google to include the YouTube app has expired. 

post #7 of 142
As long as the 'YouTube' app remains available for iOS this amount to little more than Apple trying to make some kind of anti-Googee statement while needlessly inconveniencing current iOS users who expect the app to be there when they upgrade/buy a new iOS device.
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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post #8 of 142

Quote:

Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

As long as the 'YouTube' app remains available for iOS this amount to little more than Apple trying to make some kind of anti-Googee statement while needlessly inconveniencing current iOS users who expect the app to be there when they upgrade/buy a new iOS device.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kavok View Post

According to Macrumors, Apple has released a statement saying that their license with Google to include the YouTube app has expired. 

 

DaHarder is always on top of things.

post #9 of 142

iTube

post #10 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

As long as the 'YouTube' app remains available for iOS this amount to little more than Apple trying to make some kind of anti-Googee statement while needlessly inconveniencing current iOS users who expect the app to be there when they upgrade/buy a new iOS device.

 

 

Terrible! WHAT AN INCONVENIENCE. NOW EVERYONE WILL GET AN ANDROID DEVICE. 

 

 

 

 

Keep trying. 

post #11 of 142

This is starting to get ugly. I've been an Apple customer since 1983. No longer being the hungry underdog, they are now telling users what to like and what to not like. I haven't used the new "Maps" for iOS 6, but I am familiar with and have used "Maps" for the last 3 or 4 years on the iPhone. I can only wonder now with the elimination of the YouTube application (yes, I know it will still be available through Safari for the iPhone, which some people may even claim has more features) that Apple will replace it with something called "iTube". It's only a matter of time before they start restricting what pages Safari will load, and what pages its customers should and should not see.

post #12 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digital_Guy View Post

This is starting to get ugly. I've been an Apple customer since 1983. No longer being the hungry underdog, they are now telling users what to like and what to not like. I haven't used the new "Maps" for iOS 6, but I am familiar with and have used "Maps" for the last 3 or 4 years on the iPhone. I can only wonder now with the elimination of the YouTube application (yes, I know it will still be available through Safari for the iPhone, which some people may even claim has more features) that Apple will replace it with something called "iTube". It's only a matter of time before they start restricting what pages Safari will load, and what pages its customers should and should not see.

 

 

*Not sure if serious*

post #13 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

As long as the 'YouTube' app remains available for iOS this amount to little more than Apple trying to make some kind of anti-Googee statement while needlessly inconveniencing current iOS users who expect the app to be there when they upgrade/buy a new iOS device.

 

http://www.youtube.com/mobile/

 

------>  Bookmark -----> drag to home screen. 

 

(since all us iOS yokels use mobile Safari anyway.)

post #14 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kavok View Post

According to Macrumors, Apple has released a statement saying that their license with Google to include the YouTube app has expired. 

 

I don't think the removal of Google Maps and Youtube as built-in apps five years after the original iPhone release is a coincident. This is most likely the extent of the original contract Apple signed with Google when they released the original iPhone.

post #15 of 142

TheVerge is also reporting Apple's statement that it's no longer included because the license expired. "Escalating tensions" may have nothing at all to do with it. In addition the Verge thinks it's a blessing in disguise if you're a YouTube user since it's been a long time since Apple made any updates available for it. Apple also announced Google will be introducing a standalone app for iOS, another sign this had little if anything to do with bad blood.

 

From Apple's statement:

Our license to include the YouTube app in iOS has ended, customers can use YouTube in the Safari browser and Google is working on a new YouTube app to be on the App Store.

http://www.theverge.com/2012/8/6/3223775/apple-youtube-ios6

 

so nothing to see here folks. . .

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post #16 of 142

I never use the YouTube app - it has worked perfectly well within Safari for over a year.

 

This is nothing to do with 'escalating tensions'.

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Do not overrate what you have received, nor envy others.
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post #17 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

As long as the 'YouTube' app remains available for iOS this amount to little more than Apple trying to make some kind of anti-Googee statement while needlessly inconveniencing current iOS users who expect the app to be there when they upgrade/buy a new iOS device.

 

In typical fashion, you make this out to be a negative...  Companies and People discontinue outdated services all the time -- for instance we no longer have a land-line phone service & are looking to become a TV cord-cutter as soon as practical.

 

Virtually every link you get takes you to the web site -- so the app is no-longer needed and would be unnecessary legacy bloat!

 

 

I suppose you get regular coal deliveries in the winter and visits from the iceman in the summer...

 

Get real!


Edited by Dick Applebaum - 8/6/12 at 12:08pm
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post #18 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

 

I don't think the removal of Google Maps and Youtube as built-in apps five years after the original iPhone release is a coincident. This is most likely the extent of the original contract Apple signed with Google when they released the original iPhone.

 

If Apple is burning the midnight oil, it isn't doing it trying to figure out how to keep apps based on the infrastructure of their chief competitor in the mobile device OS space on iOS. I'm sure it's no coincidence and they likely do also happen to have contracts that are expiring as well. :)

 

The good news is that there's probably a fair chance that Google will make more off of Android users than iOS users in the not-too-distant future; the bad news (for Google) is that it doesn't mean Google will be bringing in more revenue, just that they pissed in their own well when they decided to compete directly with Apple in this space.

post #19 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

 

I don't think the removal of Google Maps and Youtube as built-in apps five years after the original iPhone release is a coincident. This is most likely the extent of the original contract Apple signed with Google when they released the original iPhone.

We'll know they are serious when they no longer allow Google search on iOS and remove the GMail choice in the Mail accounts. Apple gets paid big $ for Google being the default search, not that Apple really needs the money. Those contracts are probably coming up soon too.

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post #20 of 142

YouTube in Safari is much better than the app.

The YouTube app has long been in my iOS folder called "waste", full of apps I can't delete, and never use.

post #21 of 142
Good riddance. I'd much prefer to stay in Safari to view the content. Now if only Apple would let us delete some of the other useless Apps that some of us don't use, like Stocks, Weather, Game Center, Newstand. IMO these should be optional installs.
post #22 of 142

Then here is what you do.  You go out and buy a POS Android device and stop whining.

post #23 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

YouTube in Safari is much better than the app.

The YouTube app has long been in my iOS folder called "waste", full of apps I can't delete, and never use.

Didn't the YouTube app also play any movie link by default not just those on YouTube?

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post #24 of 142

So glad the Android version of this app is incredible.

 

Amazing UI and can even preload my videos for whatever channel

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post #25 of 142

I was wondering if there was going to be a change with the Youtube app and now it looks like there will be.  The original contract was likely exactly five years which I'm sure there was much debate at Apple as to renew the deal.  The deal had some things I that I'm sure both parties didn't care for.  For example:

 

1.  Youtube got first screen placement.  That was just fine in 2007 but Apple and Google just aren't friends any more and are barely frenemies.

 

2.  Apple doesn't allow Youtube to have a logo, which is consistent with Apple and vendors (i.e. No Intel inside stickers or logos).  Google probably didn't care for that.  That restriction doesn't apply to apps from the App Store.

 

3.  Apple just wants to reduce their dependency on any vendor or tool they don't control and they will do it in a way that doesn't put at risk having the app around at all.  Google probably will start running ads in Youtube on iOS which they've never had the opportunity to in lieu of license dollars from Apple.  Apple users will not like that, but that's the price of the new relationship.

 

4.  The Youtube app like Maps was written by Apple and therefore is probably not using all the latest and greatest APIs and features.  That will change.

post #26 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digital_Guy View Post

This is starting to get ugly. I've been an Apple customer since 1983. No longer being the hungry underdog, they are now telling users what to like and what to not like. I haven't used the new "Maps" for iOS 6, but I am familiar with and have used "Maps" for the last 3 or 4 years on the iPhone. I can only wonder now with the elimination of the YouTube application (yes, I know it will still be available through Safari for the iPhone, which some people may even claim has more features) that Apple will replace it with something called "iTube". It's only a matter of time before they start restricting what pages Safari will load, and what pages its customers should and should not see.

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post #27 of 142
Here's a crazy question -- does that mean the beta for Apple TV has excludes YouTube? Maybe more evidence that APPS are in fact coming to Apple TV ?!!
post #28 of 142

The less pre-installed, undeletable apps, the better.

If I want it, I'll download it.

post #29 of 142

Good grief. Just download the inevitable YouTube app or visit YouTube.com. Not a big deal to us, but it probably saves Apple a ton of licensing fees.

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GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #30 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by gijoeinla View Post

Here's a crazy question -- does that mean the beta for Apple TV has excludes YouTube? Maybe more evidence that APPS are in fact coming to Apple TV ?!!

Prize to the first intelligent question in this thread.

post #31 of 142

Why does Appleinsider Staff jump to the conclusion that this

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

...appears to be an escalation of tensions

 

There are other possible scenarios as noted in this thread already. Why does every change have to be a reflection of some tactical shot to beat the other guys, ie, Google? Everyone's entitled to their own opinions, of course, but speculation is being presented as news.

 

<suggest> I've been following AI for years now. I love it. I do wish that we could have an editor who wants to take this site's profile to the next level. Grammar checks, less sensationalism, add originality, bring back the occasional article from Andy Zaky, more reviews, etc, would be great. (I do really appreciate DED's indepth, original reviews.) Some sensationalism increases viewership and ad revenue but there are so many loyal followers. How about you reward us by maturing the site? </suggest>

post #32 of 142

Serious question...

Does Google provide complete APIs to YouTube?

Just occured to me that I don't know of any 3rd party YouTube apps, but that doesn't mean they don't exist.

post #33 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

It sucked anyway. 

 

Just bookmark it and drag it out to your screen.

 

Vimeo is waaay better than YouTube for those seeking an alternative.  It's all HD, it's mostly trash and idiot free (unlike YouTube) and even the "trashy" videos (naked photo shoots and time-lapse stuff), have super high production values.  

post #34 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrstep View Post

 

If Apple is burning the midnight oil, it isn't doing it trying to figure out how to keep apps based on the infrastructure of their chief competitor in the mobile device OS space on iOS. I'm sure it's no coincidence and they likely do also happen to have contracts that are expiring as well. :)

 

The good news is that there's probably a fair chance that Google will make more off of Android users than iOS users in the not-too-distant future; the bad news (for Google) is that it doesn't mean Google will be bringing in more revenue, just that they pissed in their own well when they decided to compete directly with Apple in this space.

 

The accepted "business" terminology is "pissing in the soup" -- from the Peter Principle.

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post #35 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

<whine..., whine..., Apple hates users,... etc...>


I'd add my 2-cents but it appears the sane folks here did it for me...

post #36 of 142

oooooooh pretty blue status bar...

 

wait... where'd my coloured icons go? Boooooo!

 

Oh yeah and the Youtube thing is shit.

 

Apple made Youtube less crap for a bit though! Except the not being able to change video quality thing. Retina sucks for that. Takes ages on a moderately crap connection. Well, even longer than usual.

 

But yeah, Google suck, and now I'll have to download their stupid app. Dammit.

post #37 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Didn't the YouTube app also play any movie link by default not just those on YouTube?

 

No, it was probably mostly a wrapper for Quicktime. It won't be missed.

 

In the meantime, you can use the restrictions feature to get rid of the YouTube app and still play using Safari / Quicktime.

post #38 of 142

Licensing expires.. Really! to me it seems like google will now pay apple. First they will have to go through the approval process... Later, Apple will Tax 30% on any movies you try to purchase on the youtube app. All in all its good ol business.... 

post #39 of 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

I never use the YouTube app - it has worked perfectly well within Safari for over a year.

This is nothing to do with 'escalating tensions'.

I'm with you. I hated whenever it takes me out of Safari just to play a video that is usually quite short in length.

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post #40 of 142

I suspect it was google's decision to remove the app from iOS, not apple.  

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