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Apple's latest "Genius" ads no longer airing during Olympic games

post #1 of 58
Thread Starter 
Olympics viewers no longer have to endure Apple's latest series of "Genius" ads, which came under heavy fire from critics immediately following their debut at this year's games.

The three commercials, which feature Apple retail store Geniuses helping Mac users troubleshoot their problems, have been a topic of debate amongst Apple enthusiasts and industry watchers alike, many of which believe their quality isn't up to snuff with company's traditional standards.

A rep for TBWA/Media/Arts Lab, Apple's long-time ad agency, confirmed Monday that the spots have stopped running but said that was the Mac maker's plan all along. They were intended only for a ?first run? during the Olympics' first weekend, the rep said.

The ads marked a stark departure from Apple's tried-and-trusted method of showcasing the product with minimal human interaction, like those that pit the latest iPhone against a blank white canvas with only a single finger to detract from the design of the product itself.



It remains unclear whether Apple plans to re-issue the ads at a later date or continue on with campaign in general.
post #2 of 58

Thank goodness, they were rubbish!

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post #3 of 58

Good riddance. They were some of the worst ads I had seen in recent years.
 

post #4 of 58
These ads were savaged as belittling the typical Mac user but Samsung's ads labeling Apple users as clueless lemmings were just fine, right?
post #5 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarman View Post

Good riddance. They were some of the worst [APPLE] ads I had seen in recent years.
 

 

**Fixed**

post #6 of 58
Ellen Feiss is happy she is no longer the poster child for infamous Apple ads.

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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #7 of 58

They were probably cheap to make, aired a few times, and got everyone talking. Sometimes "bad" ads are the best publicity ever. Think Menards or Empire Carpets.
 

post #8 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Ellen Feiss is happy she is no longer the poster child for infamous Apple ads.


I want to see an ad where Ellen Feiss asks for a Genius to help her set up her knockoff Ultrabook so she can create a video while she's on her way to the hospital to have a baby.

post #9 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

These ads were savaged as belittling the typical Mac user but Samsung's ads labeling Apple users as clueless lemmings were just fine, right?

difference being is that this WAS APPLES doing! and they should have known better from all thier previous campaign showing how mac was easier to use vs, the PC and now they about face and say - well u got an apple u clueless dolt - but hey dont worry our snobby smarter then you staff will enlighten you.

 

i think thats the point made here - that stupid samsung commercial was dumb too - but we got what they were saying - no reason apple should make a commercial campaign to agree with samsung. - IMHO.

post #10 of 58

I'm a huge Apple fan...but I think these adds failed. I know it's been said they were directed at people who still don't own an Apple product....but again, they were a miss.

post #11 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by KPOM View Post

They were probably cheap to make, aired a few times, and got everyone talking. Sometimes "bad" ads are the best publicity ever. Think Menards or Empire Carpets.
 

I lived in Minnesota for a brief time and I'll never forget how horrid those Menards commercials were lol

post #12 of 58

So, I take it they weren't universally loved… judging by the "neutral" journalist who opened the article with "...no longer have to endure…" the ads… nice.

 

 

I got the impression they were going for a Ferris Bueller-esque vibe with the 'genius' character, a cocky mostly harmless kid, with smarts? Not a terrible idea in theory...

 

 

I agree, they aren't Apple's best… but also far from their worst. None worth seeing twice, in any case. 

 

I do miss the "I'm a Mac, and I'm a PC" series… those were almost all worth seeing more than twice...

post #13 of 58
Apple's commercials in general have been horrible since Mr. Jobs passed. Seems no one there has close to the same eye and flair for advertising as him. They've really moved away from what's worked all these years.
post #14 of 58

Yeah, these were pretty weak...

post #15 of 58
The retina MBP commercial was just fine. Show the product you're trying to sell instead of trying to be goofy and hip. I wish other companies would do this more often. Less McDonalds, Taco Bell, Coca Cola, and more commercials for stuff like the HP Envy.
post #16 of 58

I saw what Apple was trying to put across to consumers with these commercials while simultaneously feeling embarrassed how horribly they fell short of doing what was intended. The humor was subpar, the "solutions" the Genius was providing were off-screen and meaningless/worthless to the viewing consumer, and the environment choices for the differing ads were jarring (who wants to be bothered on a cramped airplane or at the front door of your place thrust into your neighbor's life).

 

When Apple approved these ads, who said yes? Who would say yes to these? Any layman could tell you, and I think the entire internet has, these ads were not quality. Who was so blind at Apple to not see it?

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When a company stops chasing profit and start chasing the betterment of their products, services, workforce, and customers, that will be the most valuable company in the world.
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post #17 of 58

It's a tough business to be in - advertising, that is.  We can all complain that these ads were not Apple's finest, yet we don't know what Apple actually hoped to achieve with the ads.  Heck, I've been using Macs since the late 80's and think of myself as being pretty fluent in both Mac and PC software and hardware.  But I too find myself flustered with doing things like making a video.  iMovie, once you figure out what you're doing with it, IS a very easy to use program and the finished results can look terrific...but.  It's not just something I can fire up and start creating movies with.

 

I think if Apple is trying to show how easy it can be to use their computers/programs, they should cut to the chase with things a good majority of the public should know about - iWork.  Those that are contemplating or have made the switch to Mac, should be shown just how easy it is to open, work on, save and send Word, Excel or PowerPoint files, not using MS's software, but Apple's Pages, Numbers and Keynote programs.  Sure, Numbers isn't quite as robust as Excel, but I've yet to encounter a situation that makes me question using Numbers over Excel.

 

And given MS programs have and continue to prove themselves buggy on the Mac, it's just so much easier using iWork programs instead.  My wife is a perfect example - a Mac user for as long as I have been, but she's never gotten into using Apple programs - she was until last year using Outlook for Mac, along with Office programs.  I finally convinced her that Mail, Contact and Calendar really did work just fine for what she needed and then having everything sync on her iPhone was simple.  But today, she still fights with making the switch to iWork, just because it's what she's used to - even though she has, almost daily, issues with a bogged down system because of one or all of the MS apps she has running.

post #18 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Ellen Feiss is happy she is no longer the poster child for infamous Apple ads.

Is it wrong that I actually enjoyed that particular ad?

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post #19 of 58

I liked these ads. The part of the article that mentioned less human interaction isn't correct though. They've been having people since they started advertising iPad. kids, students, teachers. Siri's been using celebrities. This is just a cute revival of "I'm a mac, and I'm a PC."

 

Also, if you listen to the ad, they aren't really for selling any of the hardware, they're for selling the iLife/iWork software.

 

I loved them, and I hope to see more of them.

post #20 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by mesomorphicman View Post

Apple's commercials in general have been horrible since Mr. Jobs passed. Seems no one there has close to the same eye and flair for advertising as him. They've really moved away from what's worked all these years.

 

I think anything that Apple does that fans don't like now gets labeled as "Steve would have never allowed this...".  I think it detracts more than it adds.

 

Steve Jobs allowed plenty of missteps to leave the doors of Apple (original Apple TV, Ping, MobileMe).  There was plenty of controversy too, including a lot of criticism of the original iPhone lacking 3rd party app support, which Apple added a year later and that's when sales really started to go through the roof (I am not saying they were bad before that- just that they were much better after).  No one remembers that now though.

 

Steve Job's failures and oversights at Apple were largely outnumbered by his successes, so people remember him as perfect.  This is NOT a criticism of Steve Jobs, quite the opposite.

 

I have pointed this all out to say that the beauty and genius of Steve Jobs was his ability to recognize missteps, change course, and make good products better- be that Apple products or products from competitors.  After the original iPhone sold well, 3rd party app support could have been ignored or delayed, but it was added because the potential was recognized.

 

So to realize when something is not working or could work better is classic Steve Jobs.  I don't believe Steve Jobs would want to be remembered as an infallible genius, but one that learned from his mistakes and made good things better.

post #21 of 58

Thanks goodness.

 

A nice simple ad showing how freaking awesome the Retina Mac would be a lot better.

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Do not overrate what you have received, nor envy others.
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post #22 of 58

I can see that many people felt that it made Apple users look bad, which I think shows just how savy the average Mac user is.  I believe the point was to show that you don't have to be a genius or savy computer user to use a Mac.  Apple will help you if you need assistance.   No other consumer-level company I can think of hires people to help you use their products IN PERSON as a part of their basic customer service, and Apple tried to highlight that aspect.

 

So the message was SUPPOSED to show how helpful an Apple Genius can be for basic problems, with the intention of appealing to the average PC user.  It may have worked, but in the process it offended some existing Mac users.

 

Classic advertising blunder where targeting an ad toward one audience leads to offending another.  It happens all time, especially when ads targeting men wind up offending women that use the same product.

post #23 of 58

Good.

 

Cheese belongs on crackers and in sandwiches, not on the screen. 

post #24 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

These ads were savaged as belittling the typical Mac user but Samsung's ads labeling Apple users as clueless lemmings were just fine, right?

Let's just go back to that Intro to Logic class you ditched out on in college. A competitor running ads insulting to Apple users is not EQUAL to Apple running ads insulting to Apple users.

post #25 of 58
I don't think these were good.

In fact, they had a lot in common with the "Lemmings" SuperBowl ad, and we know how well that was received.
post #26 of 58

I don't take offense to any of them.  These people exist, and there are quite a few people that seem to rain down the pain thinking you need to be a mechanic to drive a car.  Not everyone is a geek.  Not everyone cares to let time vampires ruin there weekend trying to get printers, routers, modems or a little thing like a iMovie to push to iDVD etc ...

When the stuff truly becomes intuitive to everyone sure.  But "being lost in menus" or trying to lead a horse to water is software developers biggest challenge.

 

Learn from these people, and make better software.

post #27 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

Is it wrong that I actually enjoyed that particular ad?

 

No, I liked it too, but the MadTV parody of that ad was a classic in its own right:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rme90FZucWY

post #28 of 58

These ads lacked the polish and clever messaging that we have become accustomed to from Apple. Whether that's because Steve Jobs is no longer with us or Apple needs a new advertising agency, I will leave up to the other experts here.

post #29 of 58
They were the best fucking ads I have ever seen.

 

 


Tim Cook using Galaxy Tabs as frisbees

 

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Tim Cook using Galaxy Tabs as frisbees

 

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post #30 of 58

If the goal was to communicate that Apple has geniuses that can help novice users, how would you critics go about presenting that message in a 15 second TV commercial?

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post #31 of 58
Good Lord people. These ads weren't for you, nor we're they for the average Apple customer. They obviously were targeted to the non-Apple user who is thinking about getting an Apple computer, but worries about the kind of support to expect. Add a touch of humor and a smidge of absurdity and you have these ads.

All Apple ads do not have to be (and have not all been) artistic wonders, clever and smart with a touch of irony, or massively hip. They have to reach the targeted audience. Relax. One of these days Apple will make an ad that'll appeal to you again. Then you can gush and ooze wonderment and pride in something that perhaps was not correctly targeted to the general public.

The days of self-congratulating and insider references are over. Apple is a large popular consumer electronics company targeting mainstream consumers, not semi-delerious fans and hardcore techies.

I am just happy that they make awesome products that don't need heavy adwork to appeal to the average person.
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post #32 of 58
I liked the ads too. As an amateur Apple Genius I can relate to what the genius has to go through.
post #33 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post

Good Lord people. These ads weren't for you, nor we're they for the average Apple customer. They obviously were targeted to the non-Apple user who is thinking about getting an Apple computer, but worries about the kind of support to expect. Add a touch of humor and a smidge of absurdity and you have these ads.
All Apple ads do not have to be (and have not all been) artistic wonders, clever and smart with a touch of irony, or massively hip. They have to reach the targeted audience. Relax. One of these days Apple will make an ad that'll appeal to you again. Then you can gush and ooze wonderment and pride in something that perhaps was not correctly targeted to the general public.
The days of self-congratulating and insider references are over. Apple is a large popular consumer electronics company targeting mainstream consumers, not semi-delerious fans and hardcore techies.
I am just happy that they make awesome products that don't need heavy adwork to appeal to the average person.


Good points. I might add that the ads are for people who are not Apple users, but have heard a lot about Apple and are on the tipping point of buying. And its for people who are fair with computers and just need that nudge to take a step into an Apple Store. And people in their late 30s or older with disposable income. I bet that's a HUGE segment of people at that tipping point.

 

Go into an Apple Store today and you see these people who were or are still at that tipping point. The commercials were good at that gentle, humorous nudge. What they are trying to do is not easy. I think what they did was pretty darn good.

 

Yes, not aimed at current Mac users, but the Baby Boomers who have cash and an interest in maybe trying out Apple.

post #34 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Conwaycf View Post

I liked the ads too. As an amateur Apple Genius I can relate to what the genius has to go through.

I agree.

The fundamental problem is that the people complaining about the ads are not in the target audience. Apple is directing these ads at the person who can barely access Facebook with their computer and maybe send an email who would like to do more. The message is "Apple will help you to learn and get past your inexperience - and we'll do it without geek-speak or belittling you."

For the target audience, that's a powerful message.
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post #35 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by pfisher View Post


Good points. I might add that the ads are for people who are not Apple users, but have heard a lot about Apple and are on the tipping point of buying. And its for people who are fair with computers and just need that nudge to take a step into an Apple Store. And people in their late 30s or older with disposable income. I bet that's a HUGE segment of people at that tipping point.

 

Go into an Apple Store today and you see these people who were or are still at that tipping point. The commercials were good at that gentle, humorous nudge. What they are trying to do is not easy. I think what they did was pretty darn good.

 

Yes, not aimed at current Mac users, but the Baby Boomers who have cash and an interest in maybe trying out Apple.

I love how you think 'baby boomers' are late 30s. Maybe that should the new definition.

 

Baby Boomers

Definition: People in their late 30s or older who have cash.

 

I like it!

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post #36 of 58

deleted


Edited by MacRulez - 1/21/13 at 2:55pm
post #37 of 58

Actually a lot of Mac users are indeed clueless, so the ads are just showing the reality. Yes there are also a lot of mac users that are not clueless, but that's not what Apple was trying to target. What's the big deal? I think this negative reaction really shows how shallow people are these days. They just can't take the truth. So what if my grandma doesn't know basic stuffs on computers? Really, what's so humiliating about that?

 

The truth is supposed to be enlightening. Deal with it.

post #38 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by drobforever View Post

Actually a lot of Mac users are indeed clueless, so the ads are just showing the reality. Yes there are also a lot of mac users that are not clueless, but that's not what Apple was trying to target. What's the big deal? I think this negative reaction really shows how shallow people are these days. They just can't take the truth. So what if my grandma doesn't know basic stuffs on computers? Really, what's so humiliating about that?

 

The truth is supposed to be enlightening. Deal with it.

 

I don't know what it says about the Apple community that they are so offended by this when just a few years ago PC users were represented as overweight nerds in the "I'm a Mac" commercials.  Seeing as Apple ran those ads for several years, they obviously did not offend PC users too much.  Sure, Microsoft was offended, but no one cared (nor should they have).

post #39 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZREOSpecialist View Post

These ads lacked the polish and clever messaging that we have become accustomed to from Apple...

Exactly! Well said! :)

post #40 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by rednival View Post

 

... just a few years ago PC users were represented as overweight nerds in the "I'm a Mac" commercials. 

 

John Hodgman was the PC itself and not the user.

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