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Geekbench score again leaks 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro model, now with 8GB

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Following the spotting of a new iMac model among user-submitted Geekbench scores, another new model designation has appeared, bearing the same generation number as Apple's existing 15-inch Retina Display MacBook Pro with a different sub-identifier.

The Geekbench spotting is the second appearance of the unreleased new model designated as a "MacBook Pro 10,2" (it first appeared in benchmarks in June).

MacRumors highlighted the latest sighting as having the same Intel Core i7-3520M Ivy Bridge processor clocked at 2.9 gigahertz as the earlier sighting, but outfitted with 8GB of RAM and running a newer, yet unreleased build of OS X Mountain Lion 10.8.1.



The "10,2" model designation makes it distinct from the existing 13 and 15-inch MacBook Pro 9,x models Apple released in June and instead associates it with the slim new 15-inch Retina Display model Apple internally designates as its "MacBook Pro 10,1" model.

Given that Apple canceled its 17 inch offering (apparently due to limited sales, as analyst Ming-Chi Kuo with KGI Securities correctly predicted in April), this would strongly suggest the new model will be the rumored 13 inch version of the Retina Display MacBook Pro.

The appearance of 8GB of RAM is also noteworthy because the new design of the Retina Display MacBook Pro solders its memory chips directly to the logic board (below, highlighted in green) rather than offering user-upgradable sockets. The previous appearance of this new 13 inch model only indicated 4GB of RAM.

Teardown


The unreleased new MacBook Pro model joins a new iMac and Mac Pro model designation that were recently discovered, with the new iMac similarly appearing in Geekbench results.

John Poole of Primate Labs, which developed the Geekbench software and maintains user submitted scores, told AppleInsider that a number of factors can be used to verify the credibility of benchmarks, including the OS version number, the processor model and its reported motherboard and BIOS strings, all of which appear to be legitimate on the new model.
post #2 of 17

My mother's in the market for a laptop. Still.

 

When the retina 15" came out, she wanted one until she asked me about a retina 13". I told her, 'we think October'. Now she won't leave me alone about it. lol.gif

 

Not that she knows she's even going to get one of those yet! It's just smart to have all four options on the table before you make your decision. Well, that's what I told her, at least.

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post #3 of 17
the dvd drived was responsible for a much bigger unusable volume for other components than it was on the 15inch.

i expect apple to do at least one of the following (besides 8gb ram minimum and ssd):
- quad core;
- dedicated graphics (650m); --- for me best option
- much bigger battery.

they have more 30% free space than the regular 13.
it has everything to be a hot seller, i just hope they price it so good as they did with the 15.
post #4 of 17
Would they really put a 650M into the 13" rMBP? 512 MB maybe for 2560x1600?
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

the dvd drived was responsible for a much bigger unusable volume for other components than it was on the 15inch.
Yep a perfect example of where deletion of the internal optical could be considered a good thing.
Quote:
i expect apple to do at least one of the following (besides 8gb ram minimum and ssd):
- quad core;
Yes, in this day and age calling a dual core machine a Pro computer is a bit foolish. I would even consider a dual core machine.
Quote:
- dedicated graphics (650m); --- for me best option
I still prefer AMD myself. Frankly I wonder how AMD screwed up their relationship with Apple here.
Quote:
- much bigger battery.
This is the tough one. Putting a really good GPU into the 13" will be a stretch as I believe it will take all of the space freed by the optical. This because the GPU will need a fan and lots of RAM.
Quote:
they have more 30% free space than the regular 13.
it has everything to be a hot seller,
The potential is certainly there!
Quote:
i just hope they price it so good as they did with the 15.
Err I'm not thrilled by the price of the 15" rMBP. I'm especially not thrilled by the cost of the SSD upgrades. Then again I'm not in the market for a new machine this year so maybe those prices will normalize as screen production matures.
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

Would they really put a 650M into the 13" rMBP? 512 MB maybe for 2560x1600?

I'm not up to speed on NVidias latest chips but I will be blunt and say that they need a GPU that can do the job. The last thing they need to do is to put a GPU in the machine that results in a very noticeable performance regression. However power is a big problem for such a machine, so they will need to look closely at the chips available to get the best possible performance in a given power envelope.

As to GPU RAM, in anything called a Pro computer these days 1GB of RAM should be the minimal amount on hand. I'd rather have more video RAM even if it and the GPU where a bit slower. More RAM just means OpenCL is more viable for a wider array of uses. The other problem is apps are now stating that 512MB is a minimal configuration for GPU RAM.

All of this is contingent upon maintaining good battery life. In that regard Ivy Bridge can help out some. The problem is you really need a quad core in this machine so you end up loosing some of the advantage of Ivy Bridge. In the end it is a classical sort of engineering problem where you have to blance many factors to achieve a goal.
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


I'm not up to speed on NVidias latest chips but I will be blunt and say that they need a GPU that can do the job. The last thing they need to do is to put a GPU in the machine that results in a very noticeable performance regression. However power is a big problem for such a machine, so they will need to look closely at the chips available to get the best possible performance in a given power envelope.
As to GPU RAM, in anything called a Pro computer these days 1GB of RAM should be the minimal amount on hand. I'd rather have more video RAM even if it and the GPU where a bit slower. More RAM just means OpenCL is more viable for a wider array of uses. The other problem is apps are now stating that 512MB is a minimal configuration for GPU RAM.
All of this is contingent upon maintaining good battery life. In that regard Ivy Bridge can help out some. The problem is you really need a quad core in this machine so you end up loosing some of the advantage of Ivy Bridge. In the end it is a classical sort of engineering problem where you have to blance many factors to achieve a goal.



Yeah, Apple put 512MB on the $1800 MBP just to force our hands in getting the higher-end model, there's no reason for that BS.

But if they do get a 640M 1GB on it I will be satisfied. Then I won't have to buy the 15" Retina (always wanted a 13" MBP w/ dedicated graphics) and my wallet shall sing me praises.

Edit: Also, the 640M is power-efficient enough to be used in ultrabooks. So I wouldn't be concerned about power usage.

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iPhone 4S 64GB, Black, soon to be sold in favor of a Nokia Lumia 920
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post #8 of 17

I hope this is true! Been waiting/wanting for a 13 in retina Macbook Pro! The 15 in is just too damn expensive!

post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


I'm not up to speed on NVidias latest chips but I will be blunt and say that they need a GPU that can do the job. The last thing they need to do is to put a GPU in the machine that results in a very noticeable performance regression. However power is a big problem for such a machine, so they will need to look closely at the chips available to get the best possible performance in a given power envelope.
As to GPU RAM, in anything called a Pro computer these days 1GB of RAM should be the minimal amount on hand. I'd rather have more video RAM even if it and the GPU where a bit slower. More RAM just means OpenCL is more viable for a wider array of uses. The other problem is apps are now stating that 512MB is a minimal configuration for GPU RAM.

They have done a couple silly things at times with regard to gpus. A lot of people simply measure them in gaming performance, which isn't a perfect metric for a company that produces a limited number of configurations. There are real situations where even in a notebook, 1GB can make a difference. Desktop cards are moving into 3GB on the higher end. I expect the next Quadros to come in at 3-4 along their midrange offerings. Anyway the only really silly one was the early 2011. The 6490m really had no place there. They held back on vram, but the 6770m was a much better option in the late 2011. These are very generalized solutions, so different use cases should be considered. One thing that impressed me somewhat with the rMBP is that it sounds like they may have solved throttling issues under heavy loads.

post #10 of 17

The 10.8.1 build is listed as 12A2066

 

Apple increments the letter with each point generally...10.8 release is 12A269. The current developer build of 10.8.1 is 12B13..so if this was an internal build of 10.8.1 it should have the B designation. If this had listed as Mac OS X 10.8 (Build 12A2066) or even Mac OS X 10.8.1 (Build 12B2066) I might be much more inclined to believe it.

 
It'll be interesting to see...
post #11 of 17

This is the machine everyone's been waiting for. There's a huge weight of expectation being placed upon before it even appears. Apple has to get the balance of power to battery consumption right. They know this, of course, so I expect a very neat machine. I am sure a lot of people will complain, however good it is. It drives me crazy when a new machine comes out and it is maxed out in just about every area and some geek says wait! You need to wait for the second iteration, as they did with the 15" rMBP? Apparently, Haswell should bring some useful gains in battery life, integrated GPU performance (Is this right?) and SSDs should be a bit cheaper still. I'd love to see a machine with a 1 TB SSD, discrete GPU and 10 hours of battery life. The next generation is always better, right? Yeah, right. Buy if you need it now then buy it now is the cry, otherwise wait. The thing is Apple quality since the unibody MacBook Pros arrived has been so good, i could easily wait another 2 years before replacing my existing 13" MacBook Pro. Decisions, decisions. 

post #12 of 17
I am as equally excited about the 13" retina as I am about the (hopefully soon) upcoming Mac mini. The thing though about the 13" retina is I am waiting more for next year because of Rev. B vs. Rev. A.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tailpipe View Post

This is the machine everyone's been waiting for.
I'm trying to avoid another laptop this year so I can't say I'm waiting for this machine. The fact is I'd rather see a Mini or a replacement for that desktop machine.
Quote:
There's a huge weight of expectation being placed upon before it even appears. Apple has to get the balance of power to battery consumption right. They know this, of course, so I expect a very neat machine.
This is what makes this machine so interesting as you have to wonder how they will mix up the formula. I have a very hard time believing they will do a retina machine without a GPU but there are lots of GPU options for this machine.
Quote:
 I am sure a lot of people will complain, however good it is. It drives me crazy when a new machine comes out and it is maxed out in just about every area and some geek says wait!
Apple has been doing really good with new hardware lately, the need to wait to see how many glitches there are seems to have passed.
Quote:
You need to wait for the second iteration, as they did with the 15" rMBP?
In many ways the current 15" retina is the best laptop on the planet. If you need it and can afford it the thing to do is to buy it and ignore the naysayers.
Quote:
Apparently, Haswell should bring some useful gains in battery life, integrated GPU performance (Is this right?) and SSDs should be a bit cheaper still.
Never trust intel and their predictions. For most people it is average real world work loads that are their concerns, often Intels processors are less impressive running run of the mill software. Haswell will certainly improve but independent testing of shipping hardware is the only metric worth observing.
Quote:
I'd love to see a machine with a 1 TB SSD, discrete GPU and 10 hours of battery life. The next generation is always better, right? Yeah, right.
Hey I'd like to see a Mac with a nuclear power source with a rating in years. I don't think that will happen though. Instead when it comes time to buy I will look for the model with the bet mix of features balanced against a reasonable price point. This is where the rMBP really hurts as the price is a bit stiff.
Quote:
Buy if you need it now then buy it now is the cry, otherwise wait. The thing is Apple quality since the unibody MacBook Pros arrived has been so good, i could easily wait another 2 years before replacing my existing 13" MacBook Pro. Decisions, decisions. 

Unibody was a great leap forward, I atually missed it by a few months when I got my MBP. But hey that old MBP is still running like a top, except for the self inflicted issues (screen damage). As much as I was impressed by those Unibodies I didnt loose sight of just how good the MBP I have is.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

I am as equally excited about the 13" retina as I am about the (hopefully soon) upcoming Mac mini. The thing though about the 13" retina is I am waiting more for next year because of Rev. B vs. Rev. A.

Frankly I think that is non sense these days. With the web and all you should know within a couple of months if there are any major issues. Plus who is to say the new Mini isn't just as huge of a revision?
post #15 of 17
Okay let me be fair here. Comparing say the Rev. A Retina with say the Rev. A MBA is no comparison by any stretch. Though what I'm saying is, right now the Rev. A Retina is gold and has a chance to be platinum though probably will not reach that status until Rev. B.

As for the mini, I doubt we are seeing that much of an overhaul. If anything, we'll see more of an overhaul with Haswell probably along with the iMac and Mac Pro. 2012 will just be a speed bump.
post #16 of 17

The thing with rev B rMBP is simply this, beyond a processor upgrade will they be able to offer significantly better parts?    I'm not sure, the turn over to better revisions of GPUs seems to drag out longer and longer.   

 

Supposedly Haswell will be ready for rev B but lately I'm not even sure Intel can deliver on time.   I mean really Sandy Bridge E took forever.  I guess what I'm saying is that there is nothing to guarantee that rev B rMBP will be all that much of a better machine.   

 

As to the Mini a speed bump wouldn't be that bad if it was significantly faster and introduced USB3.   The problem there is that hardware to deliver such a Mini has been out for months now.   I think this is what frustrates many in regards to the Mini and Apples thumbing of its nose towards desktop users.   There really is no excuse because frankly I don't give a damn about their iMac marketing programs or goals.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

Okay let me be fair here. Comparing say the Rev. A Retina with say the Rev. A MBA is no comparison by any stretch. Though what I'm saying is, right now the Rev. A Retina is gold and has a chance to be platinum though probably will not reach that status until Rev. B.
As for the mini, I doubt we are seeing that much of an overhaul. If anything, we'll see more of an overhaul with Haswell probably along with the iMac and Mac Pro. 2012 will just be a speed bump.
post #17 of 17
Moreover... will nvidia be ready with their next successor to 650M that is a nice bump over that and whatever they add to the 13".

Sandy Bridge E is one thing but I expect Haswell by next June. Of course by then, will Apple quickly follow up.

You know I'm clamoring for the new mini though.
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