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Designer profiles unibody iPhone 5 case design, antenna changes - Page 2

post #41 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by admactanium View Post

I would think there are multiple benefits to it. First, it would definitely make it more rigid, which is important for a large flat piece of metal which is likely quite thin. Second, it probably cuts down on the amount of time needed to mill each case considerably. Downsides would be slightly more weight and I would also think that components wouldn't be packaged as efficiently as possible with those grooves in there.

I still feel like we're overlooking something important here. I like your comment about saving cost on processing, but I wonder why that single flat piece needs to be milled at all. I also would why the ridges are so detailed. Look at the right side of the design. If they just went with straight lines instead of curved lines it would be as affective for the previously stated reasons for having grooves and cheaper than having to go around the screw points. I wonder if it's not milled at all but is modeled. Could this be liquid metal? A mold would certainly explain why you'd want the ridges and why a designer might go to the trouble or making it somewhat decorative inside.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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post #42 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Capacitive areas don't work through cloth.

They certainly do. My colleagues CrapBerry is always doing things in his pocket, even when it's supposed to be locked (it frequently unlocks itself for no apparent reason other than being a piece of junk).
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post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

It's not a piece of solid metal.

It would have to be to work as suggested, though I don't really see this clearly in the pictures, not that it couldn't be there. But you can see how I was confused based on Apple Insider's reported assessment:
Quote:
As with Apple's unibody MacBooks and iPad shells, it appears the iPhone 5's new one piece backplate and sides is milled from a single piece of metal, with integrated "bosses" that provide points to screw down the logic board and other internal components.

As for the home button, I would agree, a rectangular button at this point would be a better way to go than take up all that space. My reason for a smaller touch sensitive button was to remove a major mechanical component from daily use. The concave nature of the button would prevent accidental triggering, and making it smaller would be offset by the fact you don't actually have to depress it as far. Your convex finger only need make contact in the general area.

My motive is selfish, as every iPhone I have had has developed a sticky home button -- that is, it stops reliably responding after a certain amount of time. When they added double-tapping, that really caused problems. My iPhone 4 is the worst. Sometimes I have to place the phone on a table and press with full weight on a finger to get it to respond.
post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac_128 View Post

My motive is selfish, as every iPhone I have had has developed a sticky home button -- that is, it stops reliably responding after a certain amount of time. When they added double-tapping, that really caused problems. My iPhone 4 is the worst. Sometimes I have to place the phone on a table and press with full weight on a finger to get it to respond.

I've been dealing with that for awhile. I've taken mine apart (somewhat) and cleaned it. It seems to work a little.

This is the longest I've own any single phone or iPhone. Because of the release data change up for the iPhone to take over the release time of the dying iPod I am now over 2 years with the same iPhone. I'm not sure I'll do that again. it's just not worth spending a few hundred dollars a year for a new device.

Also, I will be getting AppleCare+. At $100 it helps the resale and if I could have taken my iPhone in and got a fresh one for a $50 cost (assuming that the 2 year coverage wouldn't have got me a new one for free) I would have done that gladly.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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post #45 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by knightlie View Post


They certainly do. My colleagues CrapBerry is always doing things in his pocket, even when it's supposed to be locked (it frequently unlocks itself for no apparent reason other than being a piece of junk).


Yeah, it works through friction and heat, and may respond if the cloth is thin separating the body and the screen.

post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac_128 View Post

As for the home button, I would agree, a rectangular button at this point would be a better way to go than take up all that space. My reason for a smaller touch sensitive button was to remove a major mechanical component from daily use. The concave nature of the button would prevent accidental triggering, and making it smaller would be offset by the fact you don't actually have to depress it as far. Your convex finger only need make contact in the general area.
My motive is selfish, as every iPhone I have had has developed a sticky home button -- that is, it stops reliably responding after a certain amount of time. When they added double-tapping, that really caused problems. My iPhone 4 is the worst. Sometimes I have to place the phone on a table and press with full weight on a finger to get it to respond.

 

Same for me. I usually have to blow the connector to make it more responsive.

Although it is a feature that makes iPhone distinct, I believe it is time for Apple to let it go.

I takes a huge space otherwise would have been taken by the screen and being a mechanical part it breaks often.

post #47 of 51
Originally Posted by Mac_128 View Post
My motive is selfish, as every iPhone I have had has developed a sticky home button -- that is, it stops reliably responding after a certain amount of time. When they added double-tapping, that really caused problems. My iPhone 4 is the worst. Sometimes I have to place the phone on a table and press with full weight on a finger to get it to respond.
Originally Posted by jason98 View Post
Same for me. I usually have to blow the connector to make it more responsive.

…being a mechanical part it breaks often.

 

Really need to take better care of your stuff… 

Originally Posted by asdasd

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Originally Posted by asdasd

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post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason98 View Post

I usually have to blow the connector to make it more responsive.

How are we suppose to resist that setup?

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

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post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by imbrucewayne View Post


Yeah, it works through friction and heat, and may respond if the cloth is thin separating the body and the screen.

Friction and heat have no effect. It's entirely about the thickness of the material separating the conductive surface (your skin) from the touch panel, and the dielectric constant of that material. If heat were involved, how would any human operate an iPhone that's at finger temperature?

post #50 of 51
Good question...i was thinking the same thing. Maybe it is conducive to better antenna reception for Cell, Radio, or hopefully Satellite radio. Probably not though.
post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason98 View Post

I love the thin factor but hate the bezels. The screen is still perceived as a tiny window compared to the entire front panel :(


Me too. Plus it's too prone to scratches...I'm sure a lot of people would agree with me on that.

15" MBP 2009, 2.4 Ghz, 8 GB RAM, 250 GB HDD ; iPhone 5 64 GB Black ; 13" MBA 2012, 1.7 Ghz, 4 GB RAM, 128 SSD

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15" MBP 2009, 2.4 Ghz, 8 GB RAM, 250 GB HDD ; iPhone 5 64 GB Black ; 13" MBA 2012, 1.7 Ghz, 4 GB RAM, 128 SSD

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