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Jefferies says Apple may have licensed JDSU's 'body gesture' sensors for next Apple TV

post #1 of 48
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Equity research firm Jefferies on Friday raised its price target on shares of Apple to $900, saying it believes both the company's much rumored iPad mini and next-generation Apple TV device are in 'full production,' with the latter product potentially utilizing a new 'gesture control module' brought in through a third-party licensing agreement.

In a research note to clients, analyst Peter Misek said recent checks with Apple product manufacturer Foxconn indicate the company plans to build 25 million new iPads during the current third calendar quarter and another 30 million for the fourth quarter ending December.

Those figures, coupled with an uncharacteristic 5% monthly jump in Foxconn's revenues for the month of July, raise Misek's confidence that the ramp up of the company's much-rumored 7-inch iPad mini accounts for the spike in production, which in both cases is more than 50% greater than the analyst's current estimates of 16 million and 18 million for the two quarters, respectively.

Separately, Misek said that recent data out of Sharp, Hon Hai, and other specialty chemical and TV component suppliers support his belief that the company's next television-oriented product is also in "full production," a surprising claim given that the Wall Street Journal report just days ago that company had yet to reach licensing agreements with any cable operator over the product that it reportedly hopes to market as a cable box alternative.

Misek also believes that a recent revelation by JDSU that it has acquired a new new non-gaming customer for its gesture control modules may signal a partnership with Apple as part of the product.

They indicated this is a new "living room" based customer. We believe Apple will leverage AT&T's and Verizon's content deals for the iTV.


JDSU, or JDS Uniphase Corporation, designs and manufactures products for optical communications networks, communications test and measurement equipment, lasers, optical solutions for authentication and decorative applications, and other custom optics.

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Last month the Milpitas, Calif.-based company said it was ready to offer partners optical technology for gesture recognition systems that let a person control technology with natural body gestures instead of using a remote, mouse or other device:

JDSU near-infrared light source technology and optical coatings are integrated into gesture recognition platforms, such as a 3D sensor or set top box, to detect and extract external information from a person?s movements. The information is then mapped into a 3D image, and incorporated into the system so that a person can easily manipulate an application.

Examples include a gamer?s movements being tracked and translated within a video game, or a person in a living room using a hand gesture in front of TV to pull up a movie or a web site.


Interest on Apple's part to replace traditional input mechanisms like the television remote and computer mouse with gesture and motion sensors dates back more than three years to patent filings for a Nintendo Wii-like magic wand controller and body motion tracking in Mac OS X. However, friday's report of a potential licensing deal with JDSU for its body motion sensors appears to be the first indication that Apple could choose to outsource such technology for its living room initiative.

"We expect either the iPad Mini to launch in CQ4 with the iTV either launching in CQ4 or CQ1," Misek told clients.

Shares of Apple rose nearly $7, or roughly 1%, in early morning trading to a new all-time high of $644.
post #2 of 48
My suspicion is Apple will end up defining this technology and leave Microsoft's System as a toy by comparison. This seriously looks like a company Apple should buy. Mkt. Cap JDSU around 3 $B.
Edited by digitalclips - 8/17/12 at 8:38am
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post #3 of 48
Originally posted by The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
For years radios had been operated by means of pressing buttons and turning dials; then as the technology became more sophisticated the controls were made touch-sensitive--you merely had to brush the panels with your fingers; now all you had to do was wave your hand in the general direction of the components and hope. It saved a lot of muscular expenditure, of course, but meant that you had to sit infuriatingly still if you wanted to keep listening to the same program.

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post #4 of 48
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Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


And all that was typed on a Mac Plus /grin
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post #5 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

My suspicion is Apple will end up defining this technology and leave Microsoft's System as a toy by comparison. This seriously looks like a company Apple should buy. Mkt. Cap JDSU around 3 $B.


I wonder if Apple regrets not buying the company behind Kinect (or adopting the tech) when they were approached before MS.

post #6 of 48
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Originally Posted by OriginalG View Post


I wonder if Apple regrets not buying the company behind Kinect (or adopting the tech) when they were approached before MS.

Actually I think this explains why they didn't. I have a feeling JDSU are miles ahead of Kinect. I will have to read more but that's my initial feeling.
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post #7 of 48

$900 share price??? Have they been smoking Gene Munster's Piper pipe? Oh wait... I took a few hits off Gene's hookah over the years and my shares are worth $640 this morning. 

post #8 of 48
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Originally Posted by bosox View Post

$900 share price??? Have they been smoking Gene Munster's Piper pipe? Oh wait... I took a few hits off Gene's hookah over the years and my shares are worth $640 this morning. 

Yep, he isn't wrong in numbers, who knows about the timing though. It's funny really. Having held stock since it was $30 I have had to read the exact same type of comment at every barrier along the way. 'OMG ... It can't go over 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 ... ' and here we are are 640. Sure it will dip and climb again but I'm holding on and look forward to 1000.
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post #9 of 48

video feels very "old" considering kinect has been in living rooms for over a year.

 

the problem with the tech demonstrated is that no one wants to change a channel by waving their hands. that's way too many calories burned just to channel surf and i'm not being facetious.

 

we have been able to cruise through hundreds of channels quickly with finger pushes for decades. apple tv will not fly unless there are very good (simple) voice commands or this tech can see the detail of my finger changing the remote clicker.

post #10 of 48
This article must make British TV producer ITV crazy.

Skil, I'm with you in this. I just can't see jumping up and down and waving my hands around in the air to get my TV to do what I want. Or talking to it for that matter.

It just strikes me we might be going the wrong direction with technology ...

post #11 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by wigby View Post

video feels very "old" considering kinect has been in living rooms for over a year.

 

the problem with the tech demonstrated is that no one wants to change a channel by waving their hands. that's way too many calories burned just to channel surf and i'm not being facetious.

 

we have been able to cruise through hundreds of channels quickly with finger pushes for decades. apple tv will not fly unless there are very good (simple) voice commands or this tech can see the detail of my finger changing the remote clicker.

HAHA! That's why generation like yours are being left behind for such narrow thinking. Current younger and future generations will forget what "buttons" are. 

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post #12 of 48
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Originally Posted by iVlad View Post

HAHA! That's why generation like yours are being left behind for such narrow thinking. Current younger and future generations will forget what "buttons" are. 

We're going backwards when the older generation had to get up to change the channel, they didn't know what buttons were either. The remote control was invented so we wouldn't have to "get up in front of the TV". I'm on my feet most of the day, when I get home and turn the TV on I don't want to get up to do so and look like Tom Cruise in Minority Report.



Edited by dasanman69 - 8/17/12 at 4:08pm
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post #13 of 48

yeah waving ones hands around while watching TV is the next new fad that everyone is going to jump on. I sorry is one of those technologies which look very interesting and people get a kick out of giving it a try, however it is totally impractical in every day use. Yeah the whole Wii and xBox motion is fun, but I do not think people will want to wave their hands around just to change the channel.

post #14 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

My suspicion is Apple will end up defining this technology and leave Microsoft's System as a toy by comparison. This seriously looks like a company Apple should buy. Mkt. Cap JDSU around 3 $B.

They only licensed it, JDSU will be the one defining the tech and licensing it to others if Apple or anyone else doesn't buy them.
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post #15 of 48

But if your TV recognized your position in the room (on the chair or couch facing the television), your identity (face), the time of day and your previous watching habits, then it might just turn on your favorite show for you with 2nd and 3rd choices available, and remember your volume preferences.

 

When you get up to exit the room, it might ask if you'd like to pause/record what you're watching or turn itself off.

 

Which.... might be nice.

post #16 of 48
Third party company dropping vague hints that could be Apple to perhaps raise their own value a bit? Not impossible

Conflict between reports about 'tv', likely someone if not both are wrong

My thoughts.

Apple is not making a tv. Isn't thinking about ever making one. They are revamping the display line up for more sizes etc including putting in hdmi so it could be used as a tv with a BluRay player etc.

This tech if it is being looked at is for identify body placement to adjust focus for better viewing and if you are using it as a computer monitor for FaceTime quality.

I highly doubt that Apple is doing anything to make the stb a cable box or to make a separate one. They have their store, they will leverage to make that the choice over cable.

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post #17 of 48

Good news. I thought the only way for Apple to get body gestures is to get a license from Microsoft's kinect which they keep resist licensing them.

Also, PrimeSense which is the one behind Kinect approached Apple before Microsoft. 

http://www.cultofmac.com/67951/how-apple-almost-got-microsofts-kinect-game-controller/

post #18 of 48
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Originally Posted by NotScott View Post

But if your TV recognized your position in the room (on the chair or couch facing the television), your identity (face), the time of day and your previous watching habits, then it might just turn on your favorite show for you with 2nd and 3rd choices available, and remember your volume preferences.

When you get up to exit the room, it might ask if you'd like to pause/record what you're watching or turn itself off.

Which.... might be nice.

Might be nice? That would be pretty darn good, but the joy of watching TV is finding that new show sometimes. I recently found Wicked Tuna by channel surfing and was amazed at how big tuna fish can get, what it takes to reel them in, and how much money they're worth.
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post #19 of 48
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Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

yeah waving ones hands around while watching TV is the next new fad that everyone is going to jump on. I sorry is one of those technologies which look very interesting and people get a kick out of giving it a try, however it is totally impractical in every day use. Yeah the whole Wii and xBox motion is fun, but I do not think people will want to wave their hands around just to change the channel.

Agree, even Siri(which I like and use) has limitations for control.... In the end we still need buttons and dials. Notice the new Lexus(?) commercial touting the touch screen? Touch screens are awfull while driving. Am I suppose to stop then select what I want? But buttons have 'feel'. I can feel were the sound button is, where the station select button is etc. Aircraft cockpits are generally designed the same way. Each knob for a system is unique. There use to be a engineering discipline called 'human factors'... seems to have gone away... end of rant pineing for the goodoldays.

 

Signed nostalgically,

 

I. M. Luddite

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post #20 of 48
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Originally Posted by iVlad View Post

HAHA! That's why generation like yours are being left behind for such narrow thinking. Current younger and future generations will forget what "buttons" are. 

Probably not. Buttons are very useful because many of them provide tactile feed back. For the same reason that many of the more useful tools mankind has invented are related to size and shape of our physical hands, so are buttons, rotary dials, slider controls, etc. This is especially true for use in cars, bikes, and motorcycles and other machinery where you don't necessarily want to look at the control you are adjusting. Waving your hand in the air is never going to be as precise as a dedicated physical control in the same way that a touch interface is not as precise as a mouse, keyboard input. Some gesture based interfaces might eventually become more convenient but certainly not all.

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post #21 of 48
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Originally Posted by OriginalG View Post


I wonder if Apple regrets not buying the company behind Kinect (or adopting the tech) when they were approached before MS.

 

Not likely.  Kinect is nothing compared to Leap and I'm sure there are other better gesture thingies in the works.  

 

If this purported TV was just going to use Kinect type technology I would call it a stupid gimmick and an almost certain failure.  One would need something of the level of Leap to make this sort of thing even begin to be useful or possible for a TV set.  

 

Completely unrelated:  Am I the only one that gets bugged by the mis-spelling of "Kinect"? (should be "Kinnect")  

post #22 of 48
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Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

While Douglas Adams was know for his wonderful wit, it is still rather amazing to see how prescient so many of the great science fiction writers have been about the technologies we've seen develop over the years.

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post #23 of 48
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post
While Douglas Adams was know for his wonderful wit, it is still rather amazing to see how prescient so many of the great science fiction writers have been about the technologies we've seen develop over the years.

 

Indeed. And speaking of the inverse, I can think of two instances (can't remember one of them, though) where Arthur C. Clarke, of all people, got it way wrong.

 

In 3001, he writes of towers to geostationary orbit (logical extreme of what we'd call a space elevator) and a ring around the world (also being considered), but talks of storage in terms of "a disc, the same diameter and about twice the thickness as my contemporaries (this is Poole, awoken after 1,000 years), but carrying only a petabyte of data".

 

A petabyte! In ONE THOUSAND YEARS. In the size of a CD. That's some SERIOUS lowballing, if you ask me. lol.gif

 

The second instance that I can't remember also involves an error of that timeframe magnitude, but where by the time of publishing reality had already caught up with the book.

 

Anyway, but my purpose of the Adams quote was to highlight the absolute silliness of "air gestures" in controlling a device. Kinect, for example, is about a 0.00.0.0.0.0.1 release of what will eventually be a true VR system, but really until the 0.00.1 release we shouldn't be waving our bare bodies around in an effort to control stuff. Nintendo (the Apple of the game industry) got it right in this regard, which is why the other two pulled a Microsoft and copied them after mocking Nintendo's 'waggle stick' and losing billions.

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post #24 of 48
Minority Report was STATE OF THE ART thinking for gestural interface manipulation and that's no where near standard yet. There is no way Apple is going to leapfrog that for the consumer to watch TV. Yeah, there's all kinds of stuff this technology may do in the future, but not in time for Christmas, and certainly not reliably.

I totally agree about tactile feedback. Most people sit in dark or dimly lit rooms and when they reach for the remote they have a few sets of button that they can feel without looking them in order to navigate the TV. That won't change, unless consumer's habits change.

And how is the TV supposed to distinguish a voice command from across the room during a Football game cranked up to full volume, in a room full of guests loudly talking and cheering? Some kind of voice recognition no doubt, but what happens if you have a cold, or you have food in your mouth? And i'd like to believe Apple could pull this off, but the reality is, they cant even make it work reliably wi Siri, when its just one
person sitting alone in a room. No this is third or fourth generation implementation, not initial product release stuff. If things go this direction, it'll be well after it is introduced, and Apple can guarantee performance.

The same arguments go for motion control ... How is the TV supposed to distinguish one person out of a room full of screaming football fans? Again face recognition? While I would like to think Apple could implement something better than Google, the technology on the Android is a major fail, and as far as that goes, Apple's own technology in iPhoto is far from reliable. So I just don't see this happening anytime soon. Perhaps a special "badge" the controller wears? Then how is that really better than a remote? At least that way anybody can use it.

I think this speculation is all in response to Steve Jobs cryptic remark that he had "cracked" the TV interface. But I don't think this has to do with voice commands or gestural commands. I think it has more to do with integrating all the channels, and boxes, and services that currently require a masters degree to install and figure out how to navigate. All this other stuff is beta, intended for some later implementation in addition to traditional methods ...
post #25 of 48

The gesture stuff in kinect is spectacularly awful and is essentially broken unless you're a) standing up, and b) making enormous over the top movements.

 

Also when Kinect is watching you, you have to sit completely motionless or it will pick up your movements and interpret them incorrectly. So yes, you have to watch TV without moving a muscle.

 

What's wrong with the remote control as an interface? It works, there's no need to re-invent the wheel.

post #26 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


Might be nice? That would be pretty darn good, but the joy of watching TV is finding that new show sometimes. I recently found Wicked Tuna by channel surfing and was amazed at how big tuna fish can get, what it takes to reel them in, and how much money they're worth.

 

Ah, but think of all the shows you will never find channel surfing because the distribution rights haven't been locked up for your country.  :-)

 

For every big hit American show there are similar shows in other countries at the exact same time that you will never know about.   Americans tend to assume that these shows are just poor copies of the US hits, but in fact at least half the time, it's the other way around and the US show is the poor copy of a highly inventive original.  

 

I don't see it happening for at least 50 years or so, but what a joy it would be to sit down in front of a screen and be able to watch any show from any place on earth with on the spot translation/subtitles. 

post #27 of 48
Bezel plastics or it didn't happen...
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post #28 of 48
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Originally Posted by Mac_128 View Post

This article must make British TV producer ITV crazy.
Skil, I'm with you in this. I just can't see jumping up and down and waving my hands around in the air to get my TV to do what I want. Or talking to it for that matter.
It just strikes me we might be going the wrong direction with technology ...
 

 

Sure, but combine the ability to have intelligent audio controls via a Siri-based user experience, and you have an excellent range of controls now. The point is that we communicate with our words and with our motions / body-language. As technology develops further with the combination of audio and visual controls, we will be talking with our tvs as if someone else is holding the remote and pressing the buttons. We'll just be telling them what to do, and using our hands and pointing to what we want. They will understand us so well that we'll get frustrated with other humans not interpreting our communication correctly eventually. That "digital person" will be Siri, at least for the first few years, and at some point I'm guessing we'll be able to customize the "avatar Siri" to be whatever we'd like them to be.

 

Remote controls are toast. Soon our entire homes will be centrally automated and the tv will just be one extension of this automation.

post #29 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by OriginalG View Post


I wonder if Apple regrets not buying the company behind Kinect (or adopting the tech) when they were approached before MS.

 

Probably not.  Kinect projects thousands of infra-red laser beams all around the room and thus only needs to "read dots" as users move around.  So it (or the Xbox 360 itself) only needs to handle a few thousand data points to analyze motion and depth.

 

That's fine for large gestures, but probably will never be able to distinguish finger gestures or to recognize individual users by face biometrics unless the user is very close.  And projecting thousand of laser dots means that the device is physically complex. Complexity usually translates into higher costs (in components, labor, or both.)

 

If JDSU's technology uses a more conventional camera, with no laser projection system, it could be far cheaper to produce.  And if it has high enough resolution, Apple could in theory detect very fine finger gestures and could recognize individual users (by leveraging the face recognition algorithm used in iPhoto for years.)  Compare that to the physically large and complex Kinect system with its relatively crude software, and maybe you'll see why Apple passed on buying the company that came up with the Kinect technology.

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post #30 of 48
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Originally Posted by zkdman View Post
[...]

Remote controls are toast. Soon our entire homes will be centrally automated and the tv will just be one extension of this automation.

 

Exactly.  We only tolerate the current TV control situation because we've been brought up with it.

 

People used to think that wood-burning stoves were the height of luxury.  Sure beat cooking in the fireplace.

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post #31 of 48
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Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

The gesture stuff in kinect is spectacularly awful and is essentially broken unless you're a) standing up, and b) making enormous over the top movements.

 

Also when Kinect is watching you, you have to sit completely motionless or it will pick up your movements and interpret them incorrectly. So yes, you have to watch TV without moving a muscle.

 

What's wrong with the remote control as an interface? It works, there's no need to re-invent the wheel.

 

Yeah, let's just quit innovating. You're right. I'll call Apple and tell them to "pack it up... We're all done here. Kotatsu says there's no need to re-invent the wheel". Wait, then they'd be just like Microsoft then. Nevermind.

 

So maybe let's go ahead and take a second look at the remote control as an interface. It's been great, but it's certainly not perfect. Have some vision!!

post #32 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Ah, but think of all the shows you will never find channel surfing because the distribution rights haven't been locked up for your country.  :-)

For every big hit American show there are similar shows in other countries at the exact same time that you will never know about.   Americans tend to assume that these shows are just poor copies of the US hits, but in fact at least half the time, it's the other way around and the US show is the poor copy of a highly inventive original.  

I don't see it happening for at least 50 years or so, but what a joy it would be to sit down in front of a screen and be able to watch any show from any place on earth with on the spot translation/subtitles. 

You're absolutely correct. Some of those British sitcoms are hilarious.
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post #33 of 48
Apple and Samsung back in court again , haven't Samsung brought out a gesture based tv system ?
I just don't get why apple continue to fall behind the eight ball and make ideas known that it's competitors can copy and put into production way before they can . To get content streamed over the Internet constantly would put up broadband prices to consumers and with some providers slowing heavy users it would be a joke to watch that type of tv .
post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by OriginalG View Post


I wonder if Apple regrets not buying the company behind Kinect (or adopting the tech) when they were approached before MS.

For those of us who have used a Kinect, I doubt Apple regrets that decision whatsoever.

post #35 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

My suspicion is Apple will end up defining this technology and leave Microsoft's System as a toy by comparison. This seriously looks like a company Apple should buy. Mkt. Cap JDSU around 3 $B.

 

Apple should buy it now or wait until this Canadian Company going under. JDSU barely survives the dot.com disaster of 2000 while the other Canadian company Nortel slowly, surely and finally failed to recover from it even with its highly creative accounting. Then and only then, Apple can join another consortium to buy JDSU's patents for cheap, like it had done with Nortel's and it is currently doing with Kodak's. Shortly after the purchase, with a bunch of RDF fanfare ala SJ, Apple will declare: "we invent the advance body motion sensor." 

post #36 of 48

People are so wrong about all of this, with the constant "voice is the future" or "motion is the future". Every Jedi knows that it takes both a vocal command with a gesture to use a Force power. It's not "these aren't the droids you're looking for" ... it's "these aren't the droids you're looking for" combined with a wave of the hand. Just one or the other isn't enough.

post #37 of 48
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Originally Posted by bosox View Post

$900 share price??? Have they been smoking Gene Munster's Piper pipe? Oh wait... I took a few hits off Gene's hookah over the years and my shares are worth $640 this morning. 

Just passed through $647.

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post #38 of 48
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Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


...I don't want to get up to do so and look like Tom Cruise in Minority Report.

 

The future will be iMatrix that plugs directly into the base of your skull. Effortless entertainment is just a delicious blue pill away.

post #39 of 48

This is an upcoming LG TV:

 

 

LG 55EM9600 (55-inch OLED)

 

http://asia.cnet.com/product/lg-55em9600-55-inch-oled-45834945.htm

 

 

LG's 55-inch OLED TV gets official design, possible €9,000 price tag ($12.000)  (update 3: LG fills in more)

 

http://www.engadget.com/2012/05/23/lg-55-inch-oled-tv-gets-official-design-possible-9-000-price/

 

 

And next Years model

 

 

 

LG To Launch 4K* OLED TV In 2013

http://asia.cnet.com/lg-to-launch-4k-oled-tv-in-2013-62215629.htm

 

* 4K resolution is 4 times the 1080P resolution used on current HDTVs

 

 

And:

 

LG supplying MacBook Pro Retina displays to Apple

 

http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/12/06/19/lg_supplying_macbook_pro_retina_displays_to_apple.html

 

 

 

 

And

 

 

Apple now getting iPad Retina displays from LG too

 

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13924_3-57397542-64/apple-now-getting-ipad-retina-displays-from-lg-too/

 

 

And

 

 

Apple TV with Retina Display Would Cost $25,000

 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/benzingainsights/2012/07/02/apple-tv-with-retina-display-would-cost-25000/

 

 

 

So, we know that LG makes the display component of Apple  Retina Displays including Retina Touchscreens.

 

A 55 inch OLED Retina TV would cost somewhere between $12,000 and $25,000.

 

Pretty limited target audience...

 

 

Except a 4K display has some interesting specialty uses -- say for video editors.  (It wasn't too long ago, that the hardware/software for a video editor cost $125,000)... so this could be considered reasonable for a large display.

 

 

Now, what if Apple were to take LG's large display and add touch capability to it...

 

Ah, but you say:

  1. it would be too tiring to hold your hands out to edit on a vertical touch display
  2. there is no editing software that uses a touch display

 

Well, for #1, what if the editor were to stand os sit in front of a horizontal or tilted touch display similar to a drafting table...

 

For #2, there may be a solution under development -- what if you could edit video with FCP X on a large touch display?

 

Jack Purcher over at Patently Apple, did some detective work and found a bunch of Apple patents related to FCP X and Touchscreens:

 

 

Huge Patent Day for Apple's iMovie and Final Cut Pro Apps

 

http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2012/08/huge-patent-day-for-apples-imovie-and-final-cut-pro-apps.html

 

 

These were written up, briefly (there's a lot of material),  at  fcp.co -- a web site dedicated to FCP X.

 

 

I posted this:

 

 

 

Quote:

I've been reading through the patent: Media-Editing Application with Live Dragging and Live Editing Capabilities. 

There are 20 instances of the word "touchscreen", for example:

"The clip browser 110 allows the user to view clips from a selected folder (e.g., an event, a sub-folder, etc.) of the clip library 105. As shown in this example, the folder “New Event 2-8-11 3” is selected in the clip library 105, and the clips belonging to that folder are displayed in the clip browser 110. Some embodiments display the clips as thumbnail filmstrips, as shown in this example. By moving a cursor (or a finger on a touchscreen) over one of the thumbnails (e.g., with a mouse, a touchpad, a touchscreen, etc.), the user can skim through the clip. That is, when the user places the cursor at a particular horizontal location within the thumbnail filmstrip, the media-editing application associates that horizontal location with a time in the associated media file, and displays the image from the media file for that time. In addition, the user can command the application to play back the media file in the thumbnail filmstrip."


This signifies to me that FCP X was designed for touch -- or, at least, with touch in mind.

I can visualize the pro editor of tomorrow standing in front of a large touch display about the size of a drafting table -- using his fingers to scrub clips, grab and drag them to the storyline, tweaking in and out points, correcting sound/timing/color as needed, combining into compound clips...

The editing paradigm of FCP X, magnetic timeline, etc. make a lot of sense for this use case -- and it would be fast and fun!

The original Microsoft Surface cost about $10,000 -- I suspect a large flat screen from Apple would cost quite a bit less.

Less expensive (and less powerful) solutions could be provided by a touchscreen Mac or even a future iPad.

Even at $10,000 -- it would be less than 1/10 the price of some of the editing solutions from a few years ago.

 

 

http://fcp.co/final-cut-pro/news/903-apple-try-to-lock-down-final-cut-pro-x-s-unique-design-and-features-by-filing-10-patents

 

 

Anyway, I believe that a large, retina-quality, touchscreen would have lots of application in science, healthcare, military, education... and specialty cases like video editors.  It may be that some of these uses will drive down the prices to where they would be acceptable at the consumer TV level.

 

Finally, that would really be a big-assed tablet!


Edited by Dick Applebaum - 8/17/12 at 1:32pm
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
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"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

While Douglas Adams was know for his wonderful wit, it is still rather amazing to see how prescient so many of the great science fiction writers have been about the technologies we've seen develop over the years.

Absolutely agree . Although I sometimes wonder if on occasions scientists see the ideas when they were kids and work like heck to create them as adults.
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Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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