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Samsung says verdict is not an Apple win, but a 'loss for the American consumer' [u] - Page 5

post #161 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac'em X View Post

Get your head out of your Ballmer. The Korean Hangul alphabet was devised in 1443 ("recently", you say?), and is widely recognized as wonderfully innovative - the forms of the individual "letters" are actually related to phonology (i.e., to the shape of the mouth). You can count on one hand the number of natural writing systems with that feature. Hangul are NOT derived from Chinese characters. (Japanese kana syllables? Those ARE explicitly derived from Chinese characters, should anyone care to know.)

 

Before Hangul Koreans used hanja (which *is* based on Chinese characters). And while Hangul was commissioned in the 1400's it wasn't until the early 20th century that it became widespread.

 

Before my current Chinese girlfriend I was dating a Korean woman and both of them are under 30 years old. Both knew the history of hanja and neither explained to me about Hangul. Whenever my Korean girlfriend wrote on my arm she did it in hanja leading me to believe that even fairly recent generations of literate Koreans likely read and write in both hanja and Hangul.

post #162 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecs View Post

I care very little about these legal wars between big companies. Today they do a big show, like if they were playing the World Cup final or something. Tomorrow they forget the match, they come to a intellectual property agreement, and it's like if nothing happened.

 

The current IP system clearly protects big companies. Intelectual property was created to protect the small businesses, as well as individual inventors with little resources. However, it ended up working in the opposite direction.

IP was created to advance "Science and the Useful Arts". Nothing in the Constitution said anything about individual, small businesses, big business, etc. Yes, like everything else in this economy, money talks and politicians listen, and the legal system is too expensive for the little guy to use effectively. Even Adam Smith, in "The Wealth of Nations" has a lengthy discourse on this matter in general. It is far more than the IP system, but the IP system is still valuable, if, perhaps, overly complex.

 

But, those on this forum should understand at the gut level, most of us being nerd and programmer types, most things we create get more and more complex and costly to correct and change over time. The laws and legal system have the same problems. The hard sciences and mathematics are the only "institutions" that take parsimony seriously, and actively focus on simplifying understanding to make the areas more clear and cohesive. Those programmers who are focused on the Agile methods do the same. But the legal system, as well as society itself, becomes more complex over time and with it develop problems that defy understanding, perhaps, purposefully. 

 

So, instead of ranting, it is best to focus on what aspects of IP complexity is inherent, and which aspects are artificial, and unnecessarily harmful to individuals and small businesses. 

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