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Apple CEO Tim Cook stresses values, innovation in post-trial remarks

post #1 of 79
Thread Starter 
Apple CEO Tim Cook on Friday released an internal memo to employees regarding the largely favorable ruling the company received in its patent infringement suit against Samsung, saying values won the day.

While the letter to employees lifts some of its lines from the official response Apple issued after Friday's verdict, Cook mixes in a little emotion, saying the win over Samsung is important for inventors and innovators everywhere, reports All Things D.

The Apple v. Samsung jury found Samsung guilty of infringing upon a number of Apple design and software patents, ultimately awarding damages of nearly $1.05 billion to the Cupertino company.

The ruling came one year to the day after late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, then in the twilight of his life, announced Cook would replace him as CEO.

In his memo, Cook said the lawsuit was leveled "reluctantly and only after repeatedly asking Samsung to stop copying [Apple's] work," a sentiment the company argued during the trial. Apple offered as evidence a presentation it made to Samsung in 2010, which outlined the various patents thought to be infringed upon by the Korean electronics giant's smartphones.

Tim Cook


The CEO made special note of Apple's ethos, and pointed out the lawsuit was less about money and patents than it was about values. "We value originality and innovation and pour our lives into making the best products on earth," he said.

Cook was "thrilled to finally have the opportunity to tell" Apple's story, a statement perhaps alluding not only to the company's role in the landmark case, but its history of innovation as well.

He concluded by thanking his employees, extolling them for the work they do, and proclaimed, "Today, values have won and I hope the whole world listens."

Cook's memo in full (as first published by 9to5Mac):

Today was an important day for Apple and for innovators everywhere.
Many of you have been closely following the trial against Samsung in San Jose for the past few weeks. We chose legal action very reluctantly and only after repeatedly asking Samsung to stop copying our work. For us this lawsuit has always been about something much more important than patents or money. It's about values. We value originality and innovation and pour our lives into making the best products on earth. And we do this to delight our customers, not for competitors to flagrantly copy.

We owe a debt of gratitude to the jury who invested their time in listening to our story. We were thrilled to finally have the opportunity to tell it. The mountain of evidence presented during the trial showed that Samsung's copying went far deeper than we knew.

The jury has now spoken. We applaud them for finding Samsung's behavior willful and for sending a loud and clear message that stealing isn't right.

I am very proud of the work that each of you do.

Today, values have won and I hope the whole world listens.

Tim

post #2 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post
 

Today, values have won and I hope the whole world listens.
 

 

                        ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^  THIS  ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^

 

 

A great CEO and a righteous dude. 

Why does Apple bashing and trolling make people feel so good?

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Why does Apple bashing and trolling make people feel so good?

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post #3 of 79
Tim Cook is the greatest CEO on earth. Mr. Cook, I need to ask you for a favor, though. Can you please tell Steve Ballmer to stop laughing so loud? I need some sleep. 😡
post #4 of 79

My car keeps crashing whenever I do 150mph. It's a design flaw. People tell me to slow down and drive normally but I should be able to use it as I wish.
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My car keeps crashing whenever I do 150mph. It's a design flaw. People tell me to slow down and drive normally but I should be able to use it as I wish.
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post #5 of 79

lol I think hes being alot more gracious than Steve Jobs would have been, if Steve were still around I think hed be rubbing it in a bit.

post #6 of 79
Now let's hope that Apple can begin to value the desktop. Still waiting for signs of a desktop update, that is a new Mini, replacement for the Mini or a XMac. It is getting a bit frustrating as I really see no reason to delay the Mini for some funky iMac update.
post #7 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by xRCx View Post

lol I think hes being alot more gracious than Steve Jobs would have been, if Steve were still around I think hed be rubbing it in a bit.

Interesting, I'm not too sure myself. This is the first time in Apples history that they have been able to defend themselves against obvious encroachment on their products. People complain about Apples legal tactics but in the past they simply didn't have the size to go after a large company like Samsung, thus the less than favorable deals with MicroSoft.

In the past Apple had to talk a good game, something Steve was really good at. The reality distortion field, the jabs at Microsofts copiers and a bunch of other things really where the best Apple could do. For a long time they where on the ropes so to speak and didn't have the capability to launch such legal fights.

It will be very interesting to watch the news and to see how this all plays out over the next couple of days.
post #8 of 79
All explained here (parody). Awesome and funny:
 
Conan O’Brien Breaks Down The Apple/Samsung Trial [VIDEO]
post #9 of 79
Apart from the obvious win for Apple... the verdict is a win for ALL industries and the employees/designers that make up those companies both big and small; the products they create; and their very jobs. Original products and original designs win. Wholesale copying WILL be dealt with.

No one has mentioned that this verdict against Samsung, has probably saved a number of companies that Samsung truly competes against: HTC, Sony, Nokia, Huwai... and Motorola/Google itself.

Actually, there’s a wide open door for Google to take advantage of... if they’re smart:

1) they distance themselves from Samsung, telling the world about their warning to Samsung, and that they were copying Apple too closely;
2) combat the dilution and fragmentation of Android, by not allowing OEMs to “skin” their products on display AND at the same time use the Android logo on that device in their advertising. The brand Android has suffered immensely from this.
3) require that “skins” be a user-installed option and be completely separate from the underlying Android code, so as to allow for easy upgrades.

The Android fans don’t want to hear this, but the jury and verdict just did you guys a HUGE favor...

....but again... only if Google is smart.
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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post #10 of 79
An unfortunate fall-out from this trial:

... there were some pretty nice looking prototype designs from both Apple and Samsung.

Those designs are now a matter of public record and no other company can make any of them.
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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post #11 of 79
I'm guessing most Android fans don't like those skins anyway. When I had an HTC phone I hated Sense. And the new 10" Galaxy Note is getting crap reviews mostly because of TouchWiz (ans poor build quality). If Android is so awesome why do OEM's feel the need skin it?
post #12 of 79
I wonder who thinks Cook will be ineffectual?
I wonder who thinks Apple is doing a 180 course change from the direction Jobs set?
I wonder who thinks Apple can't survive without Jobs?
I wonder if this case will go down as the first big win for Cook?

Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Interesting, I'm not too sure myself. This is the first time in Apples history that they have been able to defend themselves against obvious encroachment on their products. People complain about Apples legal tactics but in the past they simply didn't have the size to go after a large company like Samsung, thus the less than favorable deals with MicroSoft.
In the past Apple had to talk a good game, something Steve was really good at. The reality distortion field, the jabs at Microsofts copiers and a bunch of other things really where the best Apple could do. For a long time they where on the ropes so to speak and didn't have the capability to launch such legal fights.
It will be very interesting to watch the news and to see how this all plays out over the next couple of days.

I think you both have valid points but I am leaning toward xRCx on this one. I've listened to those All Things D audio clips of Steve Jobs not to long ago and do think that both Jobs and Cook would have said essentially the same thing but Jobs would have used a subtle word or two that was slightly less humble sounding. Not necessarily a caustic term but something a little more direct.

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #13 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Now let's hope that Apple can begin to value the desktop. Still waiting for signs of a desktop update, that is a new Mini, replacement for the Mini or a XMac. It is getting a bit frustrating as I really see no reason to delay the Mini for some funky iMac update.

 

You will never see an XMac. Ever. 

 

A new Mini? Probably. Desktops are a dying breed to begin with, but AIOs have a lot of life left in them. iMac updates will be coming late 2012 or early 2013. The last one was May 2011. What's the problem?

post #14 of 79
Apple just got up off the floor and TOOK BACK its lunch money.

Innovate or DIE bitches!

....and in the spirit of truly innovating, we are still awaiting the Vapor, err, I mean Surface, to, um, well surface.

   I am long on my shares of AAPL at $37.00

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   I am long on my shares of AAPL at $37.00

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post #15 of 79
iOS is perhaps the most overlooked achievement in computing history???

   I am long on my shares of AAPL at $37.00

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   I am long on my shares of AAPL at $37.00

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post #16 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlink View Post

iOS is perhaps the most overlooked achievement in computing history???

I honestly hope you're not serious...

edit: meaning it is not an overlooked achievement at all...by any means....at any time in it's history...it receives constant praise and it's only complaint is that it has gotten stale but it still gets the job done very very well.
post #17 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

You will never see an XMac. Ever. 

A new Mini? Probably. Desktops are a dying breed to begin with, but AIOs have a lot of life left in them. iMac updates will be coming late 2012 or early 2013. The last one was May 2011. What's the problem?

I think the fundamental issue is that desktops have reached the point where incremental improvements are meaningless for most people. Even an entry level Mac today is faster than 95% of people need, so there's not as much pressure for upgrades as there was 10 years ago.

The major exception is the Mac Pro where professionals need every ounce of power they can get, but that one is limited by availability of faster Xeon chips from Intel. However, even there Apple doesn't seem to be in a huge hurry to use Intel's latest Xeon chips, so there is some room for complaining in the Pro market. I consider that to be unfortunate. Apple owned the professional graphics market at one point and they also had a great departmental server in the xServe, but they're no longer ahead of the curve in the former and they gave up the latter.
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
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post #18 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

An unfortunate fall-out from this trial:
... there were some pretty nice looking prototype designs from both Apple and Samsung.
Those designs are now a matter of public record and no other company can make any of them.

Not true. Unless Apple specifically patented them, they're now "public domain". That means nobody CAN patent them and anyone can use them. Of course, it will ever be known where the real idea came from.

I just want to add that Tim Cook is my definition of a Class Act.
post #19 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

I'm guessing most Android fans don't like those skins anyway. When I had an HTC phone I hated Sense. And the new 10" Galaxy Note is getting crap reviews mostly because of TouchWiz (ans poor build quality). If Android is so awesome why do OEM's feel the need skin it?

They want a personalized experience to build their brand. At least that's the theory.
post #20 of 79

Great work, Steve and Tim,

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by xRCx View Post

lol I think hes being alot more gracious than Steve Jobs would have been, if Steve were still around I think hed be rubbing it in a bit.

 

Why? Certainly after all we have been apprised on Steve's character, particularly since his return to Apple, the evidence is to the contrary.

 

If anything, it is obvious from the trial transcripts that it was Steve that initiated the action against Samsung. And it was not with a subpoena.

 

There is no doubt that Steve fought hard to protect Apple's patents, however, Apple warned Samsung of possible patent infringement in 2010 presentation  *

 

As described by Boris Teksler, head of Apple's patent licensing:

 

Quote:

The head of Apple’s patent licensing effort testified on Friday that Apple warned Samsung in 2010 that it believed the Korean company was copying the iPhone.

Boris Teksler said that Apple was shocked when it saw the first Galaxy phone that came from a company it considers a close partner.

“We didn’t understand how a trusted partner would build a copycat product like that,” Teksler testified, indicating that late CEO Steve Jobs and then COO Tim Cook spoke to Samsung about the issue.

Apple showed a presentation that Apple gave to Samsung in August 2010, showing what it believed were the Apple patents being infringed by Android’s application framework.

 

Even better:

 

Quote:
Jobs’ affinity for the inertial scrolling has been demonstrated over the years. In 2010, he told attendees at an AllThingsD conference about the rubber band effect and how it had spurred the creation of the iPhone. The Apple co-founder was also reported to have entered negotiations with Samsung in the same year, where he identified the patents that the Korean company was allegedly infringing upon and invited them to work out a deal, prior to the lawsuits we are witnessing today.

 

* And well worth perusing, Apple's presentation outlining the patents Apple believed Samsung infringed upon with its smartphones.

post #21 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

OMG YES. lol

post #22 of 79
This is just the beginning. Android is the target. BTW - iOS and it's interaction with cool hardware designs is going to evolve. Apple now has a deep understanding of what works and does not work in the courts. Expect surgical accuracy going forward on patent construction. Behind the scenes Softy and Mac have settled their war. Note that Softy is not suing Apple only Android. Note, Softy is using some Apple features while avoiding clones. Cross licensing has occurred.

BTW for thos readers of Florian Mueller and his FossPatents blog, it will be interesting to see if Florian will start to develop the theory of and propose ideas for the best patent strategies to lock up both design and combined hardware/software innovations. There is a lot of data now in the courts, behind the scenes Apple et.al. Will be reacting. However, this could take years before we see it.
post #23 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlink View Post

iOS is perhaps the most overlooked achievement in computing history???


Probably true for the general public. We tend to think of physics - solid state electronics - as the true wizardry. And indeed it is wizardry. But as the computer age has evolved, Microsoft and Apple have taken a lion's share of industry profits. Two companies with heavy software focus. Obviously Apple is focused on a great end result and uses all weaponry - design , software and hardware, amongst others. Software is clearly equal to the other tools in the toolbox.
post #24 of 79

Congratulations, Apple!

 

The real value behind this legal battle, is that it answers the question, shall I innovate or shall I just copy? 

 

It's the benchmark case almost like Enron - In the market, a company gets all the praise for its practice of dodgy accounting prior discovered, what happens to the honest companies? Shall they join the dishonest accounting practice or stay honest? It's very discouraging to see honest companies gets punished, dodgy companies wins. The ultimate collapse of Enron gives the clear answer.

 

Samsung case is not as dramatic, but it delivers a clear message to American companies. "I see companies copy others without any consequence, maybe we will all stop innovating and copy others." It would be discouraging for innovation. But this case set the answers straight. It shows that US does protect innovations, shows what is the right thing to do.

 

Samsung enjoyed phenomenal growth for the past decades, but it's a very dangerous thing that if they keep on copying, gets no punishment, but all the rewards. Then their appetite gets bigger and bigger. They can do more crazy things. This case would cause chaos for Samsung, just like Enron, proves that their old practice is no longer acceptable, they must find a new way. Ultimately good for Samsung, encourage them to innovate more. be a truly great company like Apple.

post #25 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by xRCx View Post

lol I think hes being alot more gracious than Steve Jobs would have been, if Steve were still around I think hed be rubbing it in a bit.

A bit?
post #26 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

A bit?

The entertainment value of a Steve Jobs response would make the national news.
post #27 of 79

anyone else think apple is sitting on the next big ios update while all the new patents get granted ? we've seen quite a few from animated icons, and rotatary selections mechanisms get granted. this way then can sue immediately when launched if the competition follows suit.  

post #28 of 79
Apple has said and court records prove it is willing to license underlying technology, but not the dress, look, feel, behavior that was uniquely created by the iPhone and iPad. You can't copy or clone or near clone UI and form factor. You need to innovate, e.g., Samsung tablet/stylus tabletop MS Metro. Incidentally, this is the warning Google gave to Samsung and Samsung ignored.

Android community does have a lot of IP it has misappropriated, but this can be licensed. All non-Motorola OEMs have licensed MS IP and will have to license non-SEP Nokia and Apple. This is real cost of business and as Samsung MS license proves still be very price competitive.

Apple's real concern is products in the pipeline e.g., iPad mini, Apple TV, etc not have their IP copied. Its really not the money, Apple has lots, but rather pride of invention and risk rewarded.

There is a legitimate question regarding software patents in general that this case raises, but that is an open issue.

The service providers have been pushing not-Apple for a long time, their huge profit margins are at risk a bit by subsidy costs, but more by Apple's freedom to innovate without their OK, e.g., iMessage killing the SMS ripoff. They like cableTV are afraid Apple will really undermine their business models that yield fat margins, that is disruptive innovation and competition not stealing Apples ideas and selling at a discount.
post #29 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sacto Joe View Post

Not true. Unless Apple specifically patented them, they're now "public domain". That means nobody CAN patent them and anyone can use them. Of course, it will ever be known where the real idea came from.
I just want to add that Tim Cook is my definition of a Class Act.

Too bad his employees are not. Some retail worker is going to push this kind of stunt and get caught. And get fired.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

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post #30 of 79

Once again, Steve Jobs would have just pushed the "So Suck It" button, or swipe his iPhone with his middle finger.

post #31 of 79
Why would I not be honestly serious?

iOS and it's widespread implementation has really transformed the way a lot of people compute today.

Don't underestimate iOS and what it means to the post-PC era (which I firmly believe is a real thing).

I say iOS is "overlooked" because really the software fades to the background as we interact with our devices. That's a good thing and perhaps is the essence of Apple's success.

Such tight integration of hardware and software is a beautiful thing.

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post #32 of 79
Originally Posted by t2af View Post
anyone else think apple is sitting on the next big ios update while all the new patents get granted ? we've seen quite a few from animated icons, and rotatary selections mechanisms get granted. this way then can sue immediately when launched if the competition follows suit.  

 

They're sitting (working) on iOS 6. If there's something going to be in iOS 6 that we've not yet seen, it's 6th iPhone-exclusive.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

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post #33 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlink View Post

Why would I not be honestly serious?
iOS and it's widespread implementation has really transformed the way a lot of people compute today.
Don't underestimate iOS and what it means to the post-PC era (which I firmly believe is a real thing).
I say iOS is "overlooked" because really the software fades to the background as we interact with our devices. That's a good thing and perhaps is the essence of Apple's success.
Such tight integration of hardware and software is a beautiful thing.

I agree with AD. I don't think it's overlooked by another in the industry. At most, I think the general public will use the general term "iPhone" or "iPad" because it is so well integrated but that doesn't mean it's overlooked. I don't see any other argument for the success of the iPhone and iPad other than the OS is so smooth, so easy, so intuitive. Even if your average person doesn't call it iOS or know when the OS stops and the app starts they do that the brilliance that made them jump from a dumb phone to an iPhone (when smartphone sales were allocated to business users and tech geeks) and from using their "PC" for general tasks to the iPad are because of the OS.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #34 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

An unfortunate fall-out from this trial:
... there were some pretty nice looking prototype designs from both Apple and Samsung.
Those designs are now a matter of public record and no other company can make any of them.

How is that unfortunate?

post #35 of 79

This is such great news. When Microsoft was allowed to freely copy Apple, the result was more than two decades of stagnation in the development of user interfaces. When a company like Microsoft can get away with intellectual property theft, the result is that a company that is institutionally incapable of innovation (Microsoft/Samsung/Google) can become the main benefactor of the innovations of an innovative company (Apple) and innovation will inevitably cease. The best case scenario is that as many of the fruits of an innovation as possible will go back to the innovator. This is an especially good outcome when a company has proved itself a systematic innovator and the company's culture has a proven track record of innovation. Meanwhile, companies that engage in systematic theft and cynical business practices need to be punished. Hopefully one day this will include Google too.

post #36 of 79

While Apple stresses values and innovation in their post-trial remarks, Samsung stresses thievery, dishonesty and makes an appeal to ignorant consumers, people with no moral fiber and idiots who do not see the importance and value behind intellectual property.

 

Samsung's statement could just as easily have been written by a gang of thugs who just got busted for mass producing fake rolexes, and then claiming that there is now much less choices for the consumer available.

post #37 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Apple 
[" url="/t/152125/apple-ceo-tim-cook-stresses-values-innovation-in-post-trial-remarks#post_2175670"]While Apple stresses values and innovation in their post-trial remarks, Samsung stresses thievery, dishonesty and makes an appeal to ignorant consumers, people with no moral fiber and idiots who do not see the importance and value behind intellectual property.

Samsung's statement could just as easily have been written by a gang of thugs who just got busted for mass producing fake rolexes, and then claiming that there is now much less choices for the consumer available.

That is such crap.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #38 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


That is such crap.

What's crap? You don't exactly present a compelling argument.

 

Samsung got busted for stealing, even Apple uses that word in their press release to describe Samsung's actions.

 

And instead of owning up to the reality of the situation, and admitting that they were in the wrong by willfully ripping off Apple's products, Samsung spouts off some crap about the decision being bad for consumers.

 

Anybody defending Samsung is full of crap.

post #39 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Apple 
[" url="/t/152125/apple-ceo-tim-cook-stresses-values-innovation-in-post-trial-remarks#post_2175734"]What's crap? You don't exactly present a compelling argument.

Samsung got busted for stealing, even Apple uses that word in their press release to describe Samsung's actions.

And instead of owning up to the reality of the situation, and admitting that they were in the wrong by willfully ripping off Apple's products, Samsung spouts off some crap about the decision being bad for consumers.

Anybody defending Samsung is full of crap.

Let's see, your comment that Samsung stresses thievery, dishonesty over all other in business. You've taken a single ruling in a single case to make a blanket statement about an entire company (which you've previously stated was all of SoKo). If you want to use your same poorly contrived and hateful comments to pigeonhole an entire company then what is stopping others from saying the same about Apple who have lost in the UK, SoKo, and plenty of times in the US over other issues of infringement.

You've taken a win for Apple and have cheapened it by saying everything Samsung ever does, has ever done, and will ever do is based around being dishonest and stealing without any indication that Samsung is a formidable and competent company in many ways. That's is crap!

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #40 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Let's see, your comment that Samsung stresses thievery, dishonesty over all other in business. You've taken a single ruling in a single case to make a blanket statement about an entire company (which you've previously stated was all of SoKo). If you want to use your same poorly contrived and hateful comments to pigeonhole an entire company then what is stopping others from saying the same about Apple who have lost in the UK, SoKo, and plenty of times in the US over other issues of infringement.
You've taken a win for Apple and have cheapened it by saying everything Samsung ever does, has ever done, and will ever do is based around being dishonest and stealing without any indication that Samsung is a formidable and competent company in many ways. That's is crap!

Nope, I've never stated that Samsung was all of South Korea. I stated that Samsung is responsible for 20% of South Korea's income, and that they practically own South Korea, as that level of power is not exactly small.  That country even pardoned the criminal, tax fraud boss of Samsung, who was guilty of stealing tons of money and evading taxes on billions! Samsung is too important to South Korea, and that country is in no way impartial to Samsung. They'll even forgive criminal actions by Samsung, because hurting Samsung is hurting South Korea.

 

And yes, I stand by my statement that Samsung stresses thievery. Samsung doesn't think that they did anything wrong, and neither do their supporters and various Fandroids. They believe that the patent system is broken, because Apple won. They don't believe that Apple should be able to patent any of their innovations.

 

This verdict found Samsung guilty of infringement on many of their devices, not just one or two. This is mass infringement on an unprecedented scale. There is a willful disregard for IP and the law by Samsung and their supporters. I can safely say that Samsung is a shady company, and this verdict was a big blow to them.

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