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Apple's next iPhone not expected to feature NFC technology

post #1 of 100
Thread Starter 
A pair of new reports suggest that Apple's next-generation iPhone is unlikely to have near-field communication technology that would allow for e-wallet functionality.

This week, AnandTech offered a closer look at rumors surrounding Apple's anticipated sixth-generation iPhone. Because the new handset is expected to include a primarily metal backside, they concluded that NFC functionality — sometimes known as radio frequency identification, or RFID — is "unlikely" to appear in Apple's next handset.

That conclusion was supported on Tuesday by Jim Dalrymple of The Loop, who offered a succinct "Yep" in response to the analysis done by Brian Klug and Anand Lal Shimpi.

Speculation that Apple could add NFC functionality to a future iPhone has persisted for years, but picked up steam earlier this year following the unveiling of iOS 6 and its new "Passbook" application. The new native application will contain users' personal items, like airplane boarding passes, store discount cards, and tickets to a sporting event.

Apple's chief rival in the mobile space, Google, has offered an e-wallet feature since mid-2011. Many Android-based smartphones available on the market today feature NFC technology that allows use of the Google Wallet "tap to pay" service.

NFC chip


Just this week, components claimed to be from Apple's still-unannounced sixth-generation iPhone showed a mystery component that some speculated could be an NFC chip. However, AnandTech concluded this week that it's more likely that the component could be a touch and display controller combination that would power Apple's new rumored in-cell touchscreen.
post #2 of 100

The Anandtech article is a really good analysis of what to expect based on history, I do hope they are wrong on some points though.

 

Would love to see Apple release an A15 based A6 SoC, or maybe using the Qualcomm S4.

post #3 of 100

Their analysis is flawed, driver circuitry for the in-cell panel will be on the main circuit board, not mounted seperately on the back under a glass or plastic (probably glass) panel.

 

I'm not saying what we're looking at is definitely NFC, but their explanation is bull.

post #4 of 100

This doesn't surprise me in the least. Apple spoon feeds capabilities to their customers while others provide these capabilities more quickly. In the long run it won't matter because people who buy Apple products are used to this process and/or don't care.

post #5 of 100

It is just me, but Im not big on the phone being the sole source for authorization to pay for things... just call me Mr Luddite!

IMO - need two seperate authorization 'devices'. Say a key fob in my pocket would be one, then a code(or finger reader etc) on the phone....  I know, cumbersome, but Im paranoid and some say dilusional too. :)

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post #6 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by daMoog View Post

Their analysis is flawed, driver circuitry for the in-cell panel will be on the main circuit board, not mounted seperately on the back under a glass or plastic (probably glass) panel.

 

I'm not saying what we're looking at is definitely NFC, but their explanation is bull.

 

Their explanation of what it might be might be flawed, but they do bring up some good points regarding the antenna needed for NFC, and why this specific chip is not NFC.

post #7 of 100

I'm not sure if the back case can be the antenna...that metal looks like it'd be pushed against the back. Another possibility is using the case as a heat sink?
 

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post #8 of 100

Okay. I bought the 4s for better camera, faster CPU, and Siri. An iPhone 5 with just a larger screen doesn't offer anything worth upgrading to. Apple's success depends now on innovations that are truly innovative. The iPhone had a several year head start on other vendors so they could, and probably had to, make modest improvements over the years. Now, however, there is real competition for that market, requiring both more rapid innovation while maintaining high quality. It's a big order for Apple, but they have to deliver. 

post #9 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post

Okay. I bought the 4s for better camera, faster CPU, and Siri. An iPhone 5 with just a larger screen doesn't offer anything worth upgrading to. Apple's success depends now on innovations that are truly innovative. The iPhone had a several year head start on other vendors so they could, and probably had to, make modest improvements over the years. Now, however, there is real competition for that market, requiring both more rapid innovation while maintaining high quality. It's a big order for Apple, but they have to deliver. 

 

Is NFC worth upgrading to? Retail outlets won't be ready for years to come (so why not wait until then), and NFC does not solve a problem that hasn't been solved by barcode scanning.

post #10 of 100

There are places where NFC would be a competitive advantage. Starbucks comes to mind...
 

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post #11 of 100

We haven't expected NFC since it was ruled out because of it's lack of safety features.

 

 


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post #12 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by boeyc15 View Post

It is just me, but Im not big on the phone being the sole source for authorization to pay for things... just call me Mr Luddite!

IMO - need two seperate authorization 'devices'. Say a key fob in my pocket would be one, then a code(or finger reader etc) on the phone....  I know, cumbersome, but Im paranoid and some say dilusional too. :)

What do the other voices say?

post #13 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by mausz View Post

Their explanation of what it might be might be flawed, but they do bring up some good points regarding the antenna needed for NFC, and why this specific chip is not NFC.

Maybe, but I'm not convinced about their analysis.

Essentially, their argument is that a small antenna requires that the device be in close contact with the receiver and the two be aligned more precisely. Frankly, if I were going to use NFC on my phone at all, I would definitely WANT a short reception zone. The thought of someone being able to harvest information (or charge my account) simply by walking near me is scary. It SHOULD have a very short reception zone, so I don't see Anand's concerns as a negative.
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post #14 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by boeyc15 View Post

It is just me, but Im not big on the phone being the sole source for authorization to pay for things... just call me Mr Luddite!

IMO - need two seperate authorization 'devices'. Say a key fob in my pocket would be one, then a code(or finger reader etc) on the phone....  I know, cumbersome, but Im paranoid and some say dilusional too. :)

There is also the rumor of a fingerprint scanner being embedded in the home key.  So, swipe your fingerprint and then use NFC to purchase things.  I'd be happy with that verification plan.

post #15 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by lamewing View Post

This doesn't surprise me in the least. Apple spoon feeds capabilities to their customers while others provide these capabilities more quickly. In the long run it won't matter because people who buy Apple products are used to this process and/or don't care.

 

tell me how many NFS PoS systems are out there... it's less spoonfeeding than waiting for infrastructure is in place for the critical masses before deploying.    LTE was like this, 3G was like this, camera was like this, Siri was like this , etc.  Apple, with some stumbles (antenna, mobileme), tries to deliver 'great' systems, with minimal growing/early-adopter pain.

 

That said, I wished they could have pushed this a bit...  Partner with Starbucks, JC Penney, or whomever.  but my guess the big thing is the PCI stuff (think VISA/MC/AMEX et al wants to have an Apple ID in between the buyer and the seller?)

post #16 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gustav View Post

 

Is NFC worth upgrading to? Retail outlets won't be ready for years to come (so why not wait until then), and NFC does not solve a problem that hasn't been solved by barcode scanning.

This...NFC is not worth it right now. There are too many standards, it is insecure, and hardly any retailer (outside Japan) uses it.

 

My issue is that, at least in the US, Apple is the one company that can change this. Google pushed NFC a year ago, and it has barely made a difference. The same won't be true of Apple. If Apple pushes NFC, retailers will follow.

 

Creating markets is what Apple is good at. NFC is a real opportunity for them here, and I find it frustrating that they are wasting it. Passbook is a good first step, but NFC could add a lot to it.

post #17 of 100
Wish Apple would just go ahead and put NFC on the next iPhone to future proof it. NFC can be used for other than e-wallets..
post #18 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by lamewing View Post

This doesn't surprise me in the least. Apple spoon feeds capabilities to their customers while others provide these capabilities more quickly. In the long run it won't matter because people who buy Apple products are used to this process and/or don't care.

Translation:
Quote:
Apple doesn't cram useless features into their devices until there is real world utility in them, while others shovel useless half-baked technology into theirs. In the long run it won't matter because people who buy Apple products don't care whether they have features that don't do anything for them.
post #19 of 100

NFC is insecure. iPhone 5 has a BLE chip.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluetooth_low_energy

 

NFC is dead.

post #20 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

tell me how many NFS PoS systems are out there... it's less spoonfeeding than waiting for infrastructure is in place for the critical masses before deploying.    LTE was like this, 3G was like this, camera was like this, Siri was like this , etc.  Apple, with some stumbles (antenna, mobileme), tries to deliver 'great' systems, with minimal growing/early-adopter pain.

That said, I wished they could have pushed this a bit...  Partner with Starbucks, JC Penney, or whomever.  but my guess the big thing is the PCI stuff (think VISA/MC/AMEX et al wants to have an Apple ID in between the buyer and the seller?)

Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post

Okay. I bought the 4s for better camera, faster CPU, and Siri. An iPhone 5 with just a larger screen doesn't offer anything worth upgrading to. Apple's success depends now on innovations that are truly innovative. The iPhone had a several year head start on other vendors so they could, and probably had to, make modest improvements over the years. Now, however, there is real competition for that market, requiring both more rapid innovation while maintaining high quality. It's a big order for Apple, but they have to deliver. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gustav View Post

Is NFC worth upgrading to? Retail outlets won't be ready for years to come (so why not wait until then), and NFC does not solve a problem that hasn't been solved by barcode scanning.

Quote:
Originally Posted by addicted44 View Post

This...NFC is not worth it right now. There are too many standards, it is insecure, and hardly any retailer (outside Japan) uses it.

My issue is that, at least in the US, Apple is the one company that can change this. Google pushed NFC a year ago, and it has barely made a difference. The same won't be true of Apple. If Apple pushes NFC, retailers will follow.

Creating markets is what Apple is good at. NFC is a real opportunity for them here, and I find it frustrating that they are wasting it. Passbook is a good first step, but NFC could add a lot to it.

Every iPhone needs its wow feature and from the looks of what we've seen on the 6th gen, I'm not seeing anything that really pops that's gonna make people lust after the phone.

NFC + Apple's ecosystem and infastructure could have been (could still be since we don't know) the feature that makes people want an iPhone. Game changing is what people would call it if Apple did it right.

As of now if NFC is off the table we better see some jaw drop features on the phone at the event that make us all wanna RUN to the nearest Apple store.
post #21 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post

Okay. I bought the 4s for better camera, faster CPU, and Siri. An iPhone 5 with just a larger screen doesn't offer anything worth upgrading to. Apple's success depends now on innovations that are truly innovative. The iPhone had a several year head start on other vendors so they could, and probably had to, make modest improvements over the years. Now, however, there is real competition for that market, requiring both more rapid innovation while maintaining high quality. It's a big order for Apple, but they have to deliver. 

First of all, not many people who bought an IP4S will even be in the market for the next iPhone. Secondly, as noted before, there's little to no point of adding "features" that don't have real world usefulness just to be able to check a row in a meaningless comparison chart. Lastly, the competition, in reality, in every meaningful way, is still way behind the iPhone, and Apple's strategy of revolutionize, refine, refine, refine, ..., will work just fine to keep them far ahead.
post #22 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wurm5150 View Post

Wish Apple would just go ahead and put NFC on the next iPhone to future proof it. NFC can be used for other than e-wallets..

Future proofing!  Do you know the difference between Santa Clause, the Tooth Fairy, and Future Proofing...

post #23 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post

Okay. I bought the 4s for better camera, faster CPU, and Siri. An iPhone 5 with just a larger screen doesn't offer anything worth upgrading to. Apple's success depends now on innovations that are truly innovative. The iPhone had a several year head start on other vendors so they could, and probably had to, make modest improvements over the years. Now, however, there is real competition for that market, requiring both more rapid innovation while maintaining high quality. It's a big order for Apple, but they have to deliver. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

Every iPhone needs its wow feature and from the looks of what we've seen on the 6th gen, I'm not seeing anything that really pops that's gonna make people lust after the phone.

How about if we wait until we know what the phone includes or doesn't include before we label it a failure?
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post #24 of 100
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Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

How about if we wait until we know what the phone includes or doesn't include before we label it a failure?

Well, it's much easier to do it before then. Right now you can pretend it won't have anything new. After it's unveiled, you'd have to actually deal with facts. But , seriously, Apple can't afford another failure like the iPhone 4S. Not after the pasting their revenue took from that fiasco.
post #25 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

That said, I wished they could have pushed this a bit...  Partner with Starbucks, JC Penney, or whomever.

 

Or Apple's own retail stores?

 

Hmm... use an Android to buy an iPhone... :)

post #26 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

There is also the rumor of a fingerprint scanner being embedded in the home key.  So, swipe your fingerprint and then use NFC to purchase things.  I'd be happy with that verification plan.

 

No, the technology Apple is trying to buy would make the screen a fingerprint reader.

post #27 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

How about if we wait until we know what the phone includes or doesn't include before we label it a failure?

This is the Internet, how often does something rational like that happen? the next iPhone if clearly, obviously, and conclusively a disappointment and brings nothing new to the table. How do I know this? Cause I saw some possible case leaks. What do I know about the software or hardware? Zero. But I'm someone in the Internet, where saying something baed on knowledge/experience is overrated. I'd rather make sensational, horse-shit claims just to show everyone what high standards I have and at I'm officially putting Tim Cook on notice.

Seriously, the comments about the next phone have been so idiotic. What till you know a fucking thing about it people. YOU DON'T.
Edited by Slurpy - 8/28/12 at 10:10am
post #28 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetlaw View Post

Future proofing!  Do you know the difference between Santa Clause, the Tooth Fairy, and Future Proofing...

 

The first two are real and future proofing isn't???

post #29 of 100


This whole NFC situation, just like AntennaGate, reflects the dearth of real engineering know how amongst tech bloggers.

post #30 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Well, it's much easier to do it before then. Right now you can pretend it won't have anything new. After it's unveiled, you'd have to actually deal with facts. But , seriously, Apple can't afford another failure like the iPhone 4S. Not after the pasting their revenue took from that fiasco.

Are you sure about the bolded? There are a lot of people who don't pay attention to the facts even AFTER the product is released. After all, how many trolls did we have to deal with who insisted that the 4S had nothing new. In fact, it had a new processor, new GPU, several key new software functions, improved camera, and so on - virtually EVERYTHING in the phone was new except for the case.

Even reality doesn't stop the trolls.
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post #31 of 100
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post
This whole NFC situation, just like AntennaGate, reflects the dearth of real engineering know how amongst tech bloggers.

 

I agree. I certainly hope there's no dedicated "NFC hardware" in Apple's digital wallet implementation. It has been thrown around a little that they might use Bluetooth, and I certainly hope so, for many reasons.


First, Bluetooth's everywhere. EVERYWHERE. Any other system would have to be built out, and they're not gonna do that. It's just not gonna happen! If it's specialized hardware only on the iPhone, I won't be able to go down to my local grocery store and buy things with my phone for over a decade! And that's even only if the system catches on as a system!

 

Second, people know Bluetooth. I'm not talking users, I'm talking hardware creators. Accessory makers. They understand it already. 

 

Third, Bluetooth makes it possible for EXISTING iPhones to get this feature, too! Having an installed base of users on DAY ONE will make Apple's version succeed. Having to buy more iPhones to do it… will take far longer.

 

I mean, okay, picture this. How's this for the future of purchasing: 

 

You drive to the store. Your iPhone knows where you are and reminds you what you're supposed to get. Not only that, it tells you what aisle those things are in, because the store has networked with Apple and uploaded its product layout to them. So you go to the aisle and find what you want. Pick it up, hold up your iPhone, picture of the QR barcode that has replaced the old style barcode on packaging. Now your iPhone knows what it is (1). Read that footnote first, then continue. You read it? Good, continuing. Not only does your iPhone now know what it is, it's on your list now as 'in your cart', because it probably is physically in your cart by now. Do the same with all the other products you want, and then… walk out. Just walk out. When you reach the boundary of the store geofence, your account is charged for the amount of the products in your cart. Just like an Apple Store today, but with every store. 

 

You want a revolution? They'll give you two. One for consumers, one for store owners. First, Apple has psychologically legitimized the behavior formerly known as stealing. It'll take a few years, but we will completely redefine what it means to buy something in a physical store. No more cashiers, no more cash registers, no conveyor belts, no self-checkout machines that never work. Take it, scan it, walk out. All yourself. And even in advance. Make your list of exactly the products you want, pay for it in advance, and don't even scan it in the store; just in, cart, out. Simple. 

 

Second, since each store's inventory and product location is connected to Apple's servers for the purpose of helping customers find what they want and at the best price and where they want to find it, when a customer makes a purchase, that inventory is deducted from the store's immediately at point of purchase. So store owners can see in real-time at any given time what products from what brands are selling best. This can also be uploaded immediately to the product's manufacturers. Product testbeds can give results in weeks instead of months. Manufacturing can be scaled back on existing products selling poorly and scaled up to meet a temporary or permanent demand for others.

 

(1) Your iPhone now knows this product. It knows you want this product. So it looks around for better prices for this product and tells you if it's cheaper elsewhere or the same price for a greater quantity. Additionally, now that it knows you want this product, in the future when this product is on your list and you get to the store, your iPhone will tell you if this product is currently in stock at the store. Because the store has networked with Apple and allowed Apple devices to check its inventory! And not just Apple devices, ALL devices. You'll see why above.

Originally Posted by helia

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post #32 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetlaw View Post

Future proofing!  Do you know the difference between Santa Clause, the Tooth Fairy, and Future Proofing...

 

I hope you didn't patent that. It's too good not to share.

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post #33 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

I agree. I certainly hope there's no dedicated "NFC hardware" in Apple's digital wallet implementation. It has been thrown around a little that they might use Bluetooth, and I certainly hope so, for many reasons.


First, Bluetooth's everywhere. EVERYWHERE. Any other system would have to be built out, and they're not gonna do that. It's just not gonna happen! If it's specialized hardware only on the iPhone, I won't be able to go down to my local grocery store and buy things with my phone for over a decade! And that's even only if the system catches on as a system!

 

Second, people know Bluetooth. I'm not talking users, I'm talking hardware creators. Accessory makers. They understand it already. 

 

Third, Bluetooth makes it possible for EXISTING iPhones to get this feature, too! Having an installed base of users on DAY ONE will make Apple's version succeed. Having to buy more iPhones to do it… will take far longer.

 

I mean, okay, picture this. How's this for the future of purchasing: 

 

You drive to the store. Your iPhone knows where you are and reminds you what you're supposed to get. Not only that, it tells you what aisle those things are in, because the store has networked with Apple and uploaded its product layout to them. So you go to the aisle and find what you want. Pick it up, hold up your iPhone, picture of the QR barcode that has replaced the old style barcode on packaging. Now your iPhone knows what it is (1). Read that footnote first, then continue. You read it? Good, continuing. Not only does your iPhone now know what it is, it's on your list now as 'in your cart', because it probably is physically in your cart by now. Do the same with all the other products you want, and then… walk out. Just walk out. When you reach the boundary of the store geofence, your account is charged for the amount of the products in your cart. Just like an Apple Store today, but with every store. 

 

You want a revolution? They'll give you two. One for consumers, one for store owners. First, Apple has psychologically legitimized the behavior formerly known as stealing. It'll take a few years, but we will completely redefine what it means to buy something in a physical store. No more cashiers, no more cash registers, no conveyor belts, no self-checkout machines that never work. Take it, scan it, walk out. All yourself. And even in advance. Make your list of exactly the products you want, pay for it in advance, and don't even scan it in the store; just in, cart, out. Simple. 

 

Second, since each store's inventory and product location is connected to Apple's servers for the purpose of helping customers find what they want and at the best price and where they want to find it, when a customer makes a purchase, that inventory is deducted from the store's immediately at point of purchase. So store owners can see in real-time at any given time what products from what brands are selling best. This can also be uploaded immediately to the product's manufacturers. Product testbeds can give results in weeks instead of months. Manufacturing can be scaled back on existing products selling poorly and scaled up to meet a temporary or permanent demand for others.

 

(1) Your iPhone now knows this product. It knows you want this product. So it looks around for better prices for this product and tells you if it's cheaper elsewhere or the same price for a greater quantity. Additionally, now that it knows you want this product, in the future when this product is on your list and you get to the store, your iPhone will tell you if this product is currently in stock at the store. Because the store has networked with Apple and allowed Apple devices to check its inventory! And not just Apple devices, ALL devices. You'll see why above.

Interesting thought, though I imagine the store would actually have their own database that Apple's device (or just an app) is interfacing with, and it wouldn't actually be Apple's server with the inventory lists, because stores aren't likely to want to tie themselves to only one product line being able to use that feature.

 

What do you see as the solution for changing your mind and putting something back on the shelf? Will the shopper have to remember to re-scan the item before placing it back? A bit of a longer process, but I don't see how the iPhone could detect an item is no longer in the cart otherwise. That brings up the problem, though, that someone could re-scan the item and pretend it's not in their cart, but never actually put it back on the shelf, right? Maybe you have an idea for this but I imagine it's just these sorts of nuances that make the concept difficult to use.

post #34 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetlaw View Post

Future proofing!  Do you know the difference between Santa Clause, the Tooth Fairy, and Future Proofing...

Two are fantasy creations and one is a fat guy in a red costume at the mall during Christmas?
post #35 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

I agree. I certainly hope there's no dedicated "NFC hardware" in Apple's digital wallet implementation. It has been thrown around a little that they might use Bluetooth, and I certainly hope so, for many reasons.


First, Bluetooth's everywhere. EVERYWHERE. Any other system would have to be built out, and they're not gonna do that. It's just not gonna happen! If it's specialized hardware only on the iPhone, I won't be able to go down to my local grocery store and buy things with my phone for over a decade! And that's even only if the system catches on as a system!

 

Second, people know Bluetooth. I'm not talking users, I'm talking hardware creators. Accessory makers. They understand it already. 

 

Third, Bluetooth makes it possible for EXISTING iPhones to get this feature, too! Having an installed base of users on DAY ONE will make Apple's version succeed. Having to buy more iPhones to do it… will take far longer.

 

I mean, okay, picture this. How's this for the future of purchasing: 

 

You drive to the store. Your iPhone knows where you are and reminds you what you're supposed to get. Not only that, it tells you what aisle those things are in, because the store has networked with Apple and uploaded its product layout to them. So you go to the aisle and find what you want. Pick it up, hold up your iPhone, picture of the QR barcode that has replaced the old style barcode on packaging. Now your iPhone knows what it is (1). Read that footnote first, then continue. You read it? Good, continuing. Not only does your iPhone now know what it is, it's on your list now as 'in your cart', because it probably is physically in your cart by now. Do the same with all the other products you want, and then… walk out. Just walk out. When you reach the boundary of the store geofence, your account is charged for the amount of the products in your cart. Just like an Apple Store today, but with every store. 

...

Interesting. BUt what do you mean by just like an Apple store today? I don't know of an Apple store where your account is charged automatically when you exit the geofence. It's a cool concept but is it happening already? I can imagine parents freaking out as teenagers walk out of every store with new clothes :)

 

BTW, Ron Johnson has already mentioned JC Penney would soon emulate Apple stores with "mobile" cashiers.

post #36 of 100
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post
BUt what do you mean by just like an Apple store today? I don't know of an Apple store where your account is charged automatically when you exit the geofence.


Oh, sorry, yeah, that's not happening right now. But you can prepay for products in an Apple Store, walk in, take it off the shelf, and walk out. The geofence thing would be a simple extension of that which would allow customers to make the purchasing decision in-store while retaining the overall workflow of the system (in, take, out). 


Of course in all instances in all stores, before you leave the geofence you will have the option of removing any scanned items from your list. That, of course, can be helped along by repurposing the location of check out lines into simple bins where you'd place unwanted product, and then the employees would return said product to the shelves. 

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #37 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Are you sure about the bolded? There are a lot of people who don't pay attention to the facts even AFTER the product is released. After all, how many trolls did we have to deal with who insisted that the 4S had nothing new. In fact, it had a new processor, new GPU, several key new software functions, improved camera, and so on - virtually EVERYTHING in the phone was new except for the case.
Even reality doesn't stop the trolls.

 

That's why the iPhone 4S has been such a dismal failure for Apple. No one is even buying it.

post #38 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by bighype View Post

NFC is insecure. iPhone 5 has a BLE chip.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluetooth_low_energy

 

NFC is dead.

Like I said.

 

 


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post #39 of 100

Apple will not use NFC as there is no advantage for Apple.  Apple will not rely upon another vendor to create the necessary infrastructure for secure mobile payment transactions.  The consumer will use their iDevice to pay while the retailer will use a retail point-of-sale presence iDevice to receive the payment.  The transaction will be performed over Bluetooth rather than NFC, specifically Apple's mobile payment system will require the use of a security protocol suite which Apple may eventually publish.

 

As I have stated previously, the processor shown in the images is the AuthenTec AES2750 fingerprint sensor for secure mobile payment transactions.

 

One of the greatest problems with NFC is the go-to-market strategy.  Which comes first; the NFC point-of-sale terminal or the NFC-enabled mobile payment systems?  We already know from Google's doomed attempt at implementing NFC in Android-based smartphones that  NFC-enabled mobile payment systems without NFC point-of-sale terminals is pointless.  Apple will circumvent the issue by implementing their own security protocol suite which exclusively enables Apple devices to transact business via Bluetooth.

 

Apple's implementation of mobile payment systems via Bluetooth solves both the go-to-market strategy and increases the demand for Apple products.

 
 

Edited by MacBook Pro - 8/28/12 at 10:44am
post #40 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by bighype View Post

NFC is insecure. iPhone 5 has a BLE chip.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluetooth_low_energy

 

NFC is dead.

 

That chip does look like a BLE chip.
 
 
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