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'iPhone 5,' 'iPad mini' among 8 new Apple products coming before end of 2012 - Page 3

post #81 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

 

Perhaps Apple is waiting for 802.11ad later this year?

 

802.1ad isn't expected to have products available for it until sometime in 2014.  I think since we haven't seen them yet in the Ivy Bridge revamps I won't expect to start seeing 802.11ac in Apple products until the Haswell revisions next year. 

post #82 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by RBR View Post

I don't get why Apple would insist on the laminated display screen for the 27" iMac if the yields were not good. Even if the vendor is stuck with a fixed price contract for the component the lack of availability is a problem in terms of sales...aside from the fact that replacement costs are almost certainly higher.

What a lot of people want in the 13" MBP is a quad-core CPU, discreet graphics processor and anti-glare screen. Leave the optical drive in it so that it can be taken out to install a SSD and use the rotating drive for data storage.

Or just have an SSD+HDD combo and no optical.
post #83 of 97
Originally Posted by Sigma7 View Post
My prediction contrary to the defending two events.Posted imageA single event, multiple releases and marketing department who come to care for the understanding of consumers.

 

While your thinking is absolutely sane in comparison to the nonsense this article puts forth, it's still not realistic. One event, one product. iPhone. If the iPods are being updated, they'll be mentioned then, too. Computers don't even need an event unless the iMac is getting fully redesigned, and it wouldn't be unless it could get retina (but it WOULD get retina without a FULL redesign), so there's not much need.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply
post #84 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by focher View Post

 

 

What does make sense is Apple changing every device using the 30 pin connector over to the new 9 pin in as short a time as possible. Holiday sales of new accessories will be icing on the cake of another blowout financial performance.

 

Not if that's the only "improvement" in the device.     That will be perceived as a big let-down.     People screamed over the 4s because it had so few differences over the 4.   Imagine when the only thing that changes is the connector, which would actually be a pain for people who have accessories with the 30 pin connector.     The change might help Apple's need to be "zen", but how does it help the consumer?    The answer is that it doesn't.  

 

If that's the only change, there should be no announcement of those devices, they should just be "/B" models with a sticker on the box showing that it has the newer connector.    

 

I don't think you want to piss consumers off during the holiday season and having to buy a bunch of overpriced Apple 30 pin to 9 pin adapters will do just that.    

post #85 of 97
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post
Not if that's the only "improvement" in the device. That will be perceived as a big let-down.

 

That's not going to be an issue.

 

People screamed over the 4s because it had so few differences over the 4.

 

Idiots will always scream the loudest about things they don't understand.

 

I don't think you want to piss consumers off during the holiday season and having to buy a bunch of overpriced Apple 30 pin to 9 pin adapters will do just that.    

 

No, they'll just buy new accessories built for Dock Connector 2. Because it's a holiday season.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply
post #86 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

 

The mini is that uber niche product (people too small to need a Mac Pro, too 'PCified' to go with the iMac, or likely have a MacBookAir/Pro for 'most of their computing) so I can see why they will tail end the update.

 

Or, how about: the Mac mini is the only non-multi thousand dollar desktop Mac one can buy that doesn't have a mirror for a display? Yes, many people really do hate the glossy displays, but live with them because that's what's available. Personally, for me they are completely and utterly unusable.

Apple has positioned the iMac line to be attractive, performance-wise, so it is a big seller. Unfortunately (for consumers) if they positioned the Mac mini similarly, and had a small range of displays that could be reused among subsequent mini purchases, then they would almost certainly suffer a revenue drop because the current system forces everyone to buy a new display with every purchase. As a shareholder I know what they're doing is best for the company, but as a consumer it sucks. It gives us less choice, and it's a huge waste of manufactured resources that will eventually end up in landfill, probably overseas.
No Matte == No Sale :-(
Reply
No Matte == No Sale :-(
Reply
post #87 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

 

Not if that's the only "improvement" in the device.     That will be perceived as a big let-down.     People screamed over the 4s because it had so few differences over the 4.   Imagine when the only thing that changes is the connector, which would actually be a pain for people who have accessories with the 30 pin connector.     The change might help Apple's need to be "zen", but how does it help the consumer?    The answer is that it doesn't.  

 

If that's the only change, there should be no announcement of those devices, they should just be "/B" models with a sticker on the box showing that it has the newer connector.    

 

I don't think you want to piss consumers off during the holiday season and having to buy a bunch of overpriced Apple 30 pin to 9 pin adapters will do just that.    

 

Rest assured that people will scream over the new iPhone regardless of specifications.
 
There will not be any massive improvements to the specifications as the component manufacturers do not have the next generation of components ready at this time:
  • ARM Cortex A-15 architecture-based processors are not market ready (while possible seemingly unlikely that Apple would change the architecture and process technology in the same year)
  • PowerVR Series 6 (Rogue) graphics processors are not market ready

 

We are likely to see the following components though:

  • 3GPP Release 8 (Long Term Evolution) capable baseband processor
  • 32 nm CMOS process technology (Apple has been performance testing the process at volume with Apple TV (3rd generation) and iPad 2) 
  • Improved FaceTime camera
  • NFC (or Bluetooth 4.0) for mobile payments
  • 10 MP or 12 MP iSight camera (though not sourced from Omnivision)

 

We are at a point where aside from evolutionary improvements there are not significant improvements likely; however, the following technologies are certainly important and valuable to consumers:

  • 20 nm CMOS process technology (ready for the 2014 iPhone at the earliest) (novel approaches will be required by 2020)
  • ARM Cortex A-15 architecture-based processors
  • PowerVR Series 6 (Rogue) graphics processors
  • 3GPP Release 10 (Long Term Evolution Advanced) capable baseband processor
  • 802.11ac Wi-Fi capable processor
  • 12 MP iSight camera (and beyond) with improved optics and backlight sensor as well as a larger and faster aperture (

 

Likewise, significant improvements are unlikely in software either although certainly some possibilities exist.

 

 

Interestingly, this does not deter Android-based smartphone proponents from (apparently) purchasing a new smartphone every three months.  Despite what Android-based smartphone manufacturers might have you believe, significant improvements are not possible every three months.  One significant improvement to a single component is possible, perhaps even two but despite comments to the contrary the Apple iPhone has been the defining smartphone every year that Apple has released a new iPhone.  After all, virtually no one asks how a new smartphone compares to the Lava XOLO x900 which is currently the fastest smartphone according to benchmarks.

 
 
 

Edited by MacBook Pro - 9/2/12 at 2:30pm
post #88 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post

Or, how about: the Mac mini is the only non-multi thousand dollar desktop Mac one can buy that doesn't have a mirror for a display? Yes, many people really do hate the glossy displays, but live with them because that's what's available. Personally, for me they are completely and utterly unusable.
Nobody wants to hear about your problems. If you can't leverage Apples hardware that is more of a problem with you not the hardware.
Quote:

Apple has positioned the iMac line to be attractive, performance-wise, so it is a big seller. Unfortunately (for consumers) if they positioned the Mac mini similarly, and had a small range of displays that could be reused among subsequent mini purchases, then they would almost certainly suffer a revenue drop because the current system forces everyone to buy a new display with every purchase.
I've heard this argument before and frankly it is bull crap.
Quote:
As a shareholder I know what they're doing is best for the company, but as a consumer it sucks. It gives us less choice, and it's a huge waste of manufactured resources that will eventually end up in landfill, probably overseas.

Considering most Apple hardware lasts for a very long time I don't buy this arguement either. All computers eventually have to be disposed of or recycled, so those that remain viable the longest have a minimal environmental impact vs hardware that is outmoded in a year.

Frankly as a shareholder, va a 401K, I'm extremely disappointed with Apples desktop line up. Less choice leads to fewer customers and less diversity in applications or uses for Apples hardware. In a way Apple is shooting itself in the foot and limiting adoption of the Mac platform. The simple reality is a laptop is not a solution to every computing problem.
post #89 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

Rest assured that people will scream over the new iPhone regardless of specifications.
 
So true.
Quote:
There will not be any massive improvements to the specifications as the component manufacturers do not have the next generation of components ready at this time:
  • ARM Cortex A-15 architecture-based processors are not market ready (while possible seemingly unlikely that Apple would change the architecture and process technology in the same year)
I'd be shocked if Apple went with Cortex A-15, it is the wrong evolutionary path for iOS. Until they can put a 64 bit ARM in the device, they have plenty of room with Cortex A-9.

Speaking of which, does anybody think Apple screwed up with their confusing processor naming?
Quote:
[*] PowerVR Series 6 (Rogue) graphics processors are not market ready
Err, possibly. If anybody is capable of delivering a new GPU to the mobile market it is Apple,
Quote:
We are likely to see the following components though:
  • 3GPP Release 8 (Long Term Evolution) capable baseband processor
  • 32 nm CMOS process technology (Apple has been performance testing the process at volume with Apple TV (3rd generation) and iPad 2) 
  • Improved FaceTime camera
Is this really needed?
Quote:
[*] NFC (or Bluetooth 4.0) for mobile payments
Maybe maybe not.
Quote:
[*] 10 MP or 12 MP iSight camera (though not sourced from Omnivision)
I doubt this one highly. For one you need an optical system to really leverage such a sensor. More importantly there is more to picture quality than pixels. For example I'd really like to see vastly improved low light capability.
Quote:

We are at a point where aside from evolutionary improvements there are not significant improvements likely; however, the following technologies are certainly important and valuable to consumers:
We where at that point 2 years ago. It amazes me that people expect Apple to pull a rabbit out of the hat and totally surprise them. If you ask what that Rabbit would be they end up with a blank stare or state that is for Apple to fiqure out. IPhone will improve every year but redefine the market was the job of the first rev to market.
Quote:
  • 20 nm CMOS process technology (ready for the 2014 iPhone at the earliest) (novel approaches will be required by 2020)
They might skip this node and go directly to 14 nm. I'm actually thinking Apple is starting to feel,the heat and may up and buy a foundry to start making their own chips. Yeah I know billions of dollars down the drain but it may be required to protect their back side.
Quote:
[*] ARM Cortex A-15 architecture-based processors
A9 has a ways to go yet. After that the smart move for iOS is 64 bit hardware.
Quote:
[*] PowerVR Series 6 (Rogue) graphics processors
[*] 3GPP Release 10 (Long Term Evolution Advanced) capable baseband processor
[*] 802.11ac Wi-Fi capable processor
[*] 12 MP iSight camera (and beyond) with improved optics and backlight sensor as well as a larger and faster aperture (


Likewise, significant improvements are unlikely in software either although certainly some possibilities exist.
This I'm not to sure about. Apple has made great strides with LLVM/CLANG and the tools around that suite of software. The support tools especially are interesting because things like static checkers should lead to much more reliable software.

In any event the thing that kills iOS devices more than anything else is the lack of RAM. More RAM could lead to artificial intelligence embedded in the hardware instead of accessing that over the Internet ala Siri.
Quote:

Interestingly, this does not deter Android-based smartphone proponents from (apparently) purchasing a new smartphone every three months.  Despite what Android-based smartphone manufacturers might have you believe, significant improvements are not possible every three months.
Yes this is true but it is also true a sucker is born every minute.
Quote:
 One significant improvement to a single component is possible, perhaps even two but despite comments to the contrary the Apple iPhone has been the defining smartphone every year that Apple has released a new iPhone.  After all, virtually no one asks how a new smartphone compares to the Lava XOLO x900 which is currently the fastest smartphone according to benchmarks. 
Apple changed the face of the handset industry and focused people on things that are more valuable. Like it or not the latest and greatest hardware is useless without software and Apple has users focused on software.
post #90 of 97

I doubt they would launch two different sized iMacs at separate events. They will launch them at the same event but the 27" will have a shipping delay.

 

And I hope there will be 2 versions of the 21", one with Retina and one without, same as with the MBP.

post #91 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

I'd be shocked if Apple went with Cortex A-15, it is the wrong evolutionary path for iOS. Until they can put a 64 bit ARM in the device, they have plenty of room with Cortex A-9.
Speaking of which, does anybody think Apple screwed up with their confusing processor naming?

So, what do you think they will do with the ARM Cortex A-9 architecture? More cores? Higher clock speeds? Competitors have already announced ARM Cortex A-15 based processors in smartphones for 2013.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Err, possibly. If anybody is capable of delivering a new GPU to the mobile market it is Apple,

Interesting comment. I am not sure I understand your statement since Apple doesn't manufacture graphics processors. Are you suggesting that Apple has purchased PowerVR's entire capacity for the PowerVR Series 6 (Rogue) graphics processors for 2012. My understanding is that PowerVR Series 6 (Rogue) graphics processors won't be available in volume until 2Q2013 at the earliest. Apple does have a significant investment in Imagination Technologies so procurement ahead of competitors is possible.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Is this really needed?

Yes.
3GPP Release 8 (Long Term Evolution) capable baseband processor improves the user experience especially in regards to Maps and Siri although the modest gains for other apps isn't as important. In my opinion, 2013 is too late to release a 3GPP LTE iPhone as Verizon already has a nationwide LTE network and although AT&T and Sprint are moving slower than molasses going uphill in a snowstorm they should have significant deployments by 3Q2013.
32 nm CMOS process technology (Apple has been performance testing the process at volume with Apple TV (3rd generation) and iPad 2) improves energy efficiency thus reducing power requirements.
Improved FaceTime camera could improve the sense of "being there" with friends and family.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Maybe maybe not.

I have made several statements regarding mobile payments. There is no question in my mind but ultimately the answer is "maybe."
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

I doubt this one highly. For one you need an optical system to really leverage such a sensor. More importantly there is more to picture quality than pixels. For example I'd really like to see vastly improved low light capability.

There are important factors beyond the number of pixels captured which is why I believe (among other reasons) that Omnivision is not supplying the next iSight camera sensor. I am less certain that a 10MP camera sensor will be included although I if I recall correctly Apple has improved the iSight camera sensor in every version of the iPhone.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

We where at that point 2 years ago. It amazes me that people expect Apple to pull a rabbit out of the hat and totally surprise them. If you ask what that Rabbit would be they end up with a blank stare or state that is for Apple to fiqure out. IPhone will improve every year but redefine the market was the job of the first rev to market.

No argument. This is the myth that Android-based smartphone proponents perpetual though. Ironically, Android-based smartphones have never been innovative despite having a few more features and functions (that don't offer the average consumer any value) than the Apple iPhone.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

They might skip this node and go directly to 14 nm. I'm actually thinking Apple is starting to feel,the heat and may up and buy a foundry to start making their own chips. Yeah I know billions of dollars down the drain but it may be required to protect their back side.

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company Limited (TSMC) is focusing on their 20 nm process; likely in a bid for the iPhone 2014 since TSMC attempted to skip 28/32 nm process entirely. As far as I know, no fabricator has a 14nm process ready for mass volume at this time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

A9 has a ways to go yet. After that the smart move for iOS is 64 bit hardware.

What improvements can be made to the ARM Cortex A-9 architecture in the iPhone series? More cores? Heterogeneous architecture? Higher clock speeds?
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

This I'm not to sure about. Apple has made great strides with LLVM/CLANG and the tools around that suite of software. The support tools especially are interesting because things like static checkers should lead to much more reliable software.

Interesting, I haven't heard this. I wouldn't consider this a compelling marketing feature for the average consumer though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

In any event the thing that kills iOS devices more than anything else is the lack of RAM. More RAM could lead to artificial intelligence embedded in the hardware instead of accessing that over the Internet ala Siri.

I agree. I would like to see Apple implement speech recognition on the iPhone. I would specifically like to see Apple improve "Voice Control" and implement a system to submit a request to Siri and "Vocie Control" then respond to the approach that responds first. I would also like Apple to implement the automated, predictive response capability in Siri as well.

It is important though to recognize that connectivity is what makes smartphones "smart." I find it somewhat amusing when people show concern about the ability to load maps on their smartphone. These same people argue in favor of Internet radio rather than iTunes. If you don't have connectivity you don't have email, iMessage, MMS, SMS or telephone service. If you don't have connectivity you don't have GPS/GLONASS. If you don't have connectivity you don't have Siri. If you don't have connectivity you don't have... the Internet.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Yes this is true but it is also true a sucker is born every minute.

I don't understand the Android-based smartphone proponent mindset. The Apple iPhone 4S is still demonstrably better overall than any other smartphone on the market even today.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Apple changed the face of the handset industry and focused people on things that are more valuable. Like it or not the latest and greatest hardware is useless without software and Apple has users focused on software.

Software is important, in fact, Apple has made some decent improvements to core services in iOS 6 providing an improved user experience.
Edited by MacBook Pro - 9/3/12 at 11:08am
post #92 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

So, what do you think they will do with the ARM Cortex A-9 architecture? More cores? Higher clock speeds? Competitors have already announced ARM Cortex A-15 based processors in smartphones for 2013.
Higher clock speeds are likely. A-15 is an interesting platform but I simply don't see it as a long term play, especially when things like iPad could migrate to 64 bit tomorrow and keep Apple well ahead of the industry.

Your question is interesting though, does Apple go with more cores or much higher clock speeds? I suspect more cores with slightly higher clock speeds are the way forward. The slightly higher clock speed would benefit apps that are hard to parallelize while the majority of apps can benefit from more cores. Cores are good for power management too.
Quote:
Interesting comment. I am not sure I understand your statement since Apple doesn't manufacture graphics processors. Are you suggesting that Apple has purchased PowerVR's entire capacity for the PowerVR Series 6 (Rogue) graphics processors for 2012. My understanding is that PowerVR Series 6 (Rogue) graphics processors won't be available in volume until 2Q2013 at the earliest. Apple does have a significant investment in Imagination Technologies so procurement ahead of competitors is possible.
Not at all! What I'm saying is that Apple has the resources to partner with Imagination to bring Rogue to market before anybody else. Further Apple owns enough of Imagination to get the access they need, something like 12% of the company. It isn't so much procurement as it is a partnership, they would combine resources to integrate Rogue into the next SoC. that is if Apple even goes that route. I'm still thinking we will see a split sometime in the future where tablet processors and cell phone processors go in slightly different directions with a greater stress on low power in the cell phone processor.

In a nut shell it is very hard to tell from the outside if Roque is ready to go or not.
Quote:

Yes.
3GPP Release 8 (Long Term Evolution) capable baseband processor improves the user experience especially in regards to Maps and Siri although the modest gains for other apps isn't as important. In my opinion, 2013 is too late to release a 3GPP LTE iPhone as Verizon already has a nationwide LTE network and although AT&T and Sprint are moving slower than molasses going uphill in a snowstorm they should have significant deployments by 3Q2013.
I have to admit that LTE works great on my iPad even if it is on AT&T. Frankly iPad has replaced my iPhone for some of those uses you describe. The difference between Maps on an iPad and on the iPhone makes such use on iPhone trying.
Quote:
32 nm CMOS process technology (Apple has been performance testing the process at volume with Apple TV (3rd generation) and iPad 2) improves energy efficiency thus reducing power requirements.
Improved FaceTime camera could improve the sense of "being there" with friends and family.
32 nm is great as long as it is actually used to lower power usage. It is very possible that they might take any power improvements and burn those improvements up on improved performance and new features.

As to FaceTime, I've never used it and don't have a dying desire to use it.
Quote:
I have made several statements regarding mobile payments. There is no question in my mind but ultimately the answer is "maybe."

There are important factors beyond the number of pixels captured which is why I believe (among other reasons) that Omnivision is not supplying the next iSight camera sensor. I am less certain that a 10MP camera sensor will be included although I if I recall correctly Apple has improved the iSight camera sensor in every version of the iPhone.
Improved that is for sure I just don't see a reason to focus on pixel count. Like I said if they do anything I'd like to see an improved low light capability and maybe even an optical zoom. Even a good 2X optical zoom would blow away anything that more pixels would offer. Especially if those pixels result in a regression in image quality.
Quote:
No argument. This is the myth that Android-based smartphone proponents perpetual though. Ironically, Android-based smartphones have never been innovative despite having a few more features and functions (that don't offer the average consumer any value) than the Apple iPhone.
They can't innovate because the stole everything from Apple.
Quote:
Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company Limited (TSMC) is focusing on their 20 nm process; likely in a bid for the iPhone 2014 since TSMC attempted to skip 28/32 nm process entirely. As far as I know, no fabricator has a 14nm process ready for mass volume at this time.
It was my understanding that Apple was talking to TSMC about sub 20 nm processes. I would imagine their contract with Sansung is long term.
Quote:
What improvements can be made to the ARM Cortex A-9 architecture in the iPhone series? More cores? Heterogeneous architecture? Higher clock speeds?
I think the key here is to look at the SoC as a whole. I don't think Apple would go with a Heterogenous architecture with A9 cores, instead such an effort would likely go into the 64 bit core. The reason is simple, that would be a lot of effort on the part of all three partners, you would not want to waste such effort on old core technology.

I suspect more special purpose functionality will go into the next iPhone SoC. One item being a new hardware decoder for that latest video standard. It AI possible that they might add extra capability to the ARM cores possibly accelerators for Objective C code. Higher clock speeds go hand in hand with process shrinks and are needed no matter what.
Quote:
Interesting, I haven't heard this. I wouldn't consider this a compelling marketing feature for the average consumer though.
no not a consummer feature but it does help developers deliver better code
Quote:
I agree. I would like to see Apple implement speech recognition on the iPhone. I would specifically like to see Apple improve "Voice Control" and implement a system to submit a request to Siri and "Vocie Control" then respond to the approach that responds first. I would also like Apple to implement the automated, predictive response capability in Siri as well.
There is a reason they call Siri a beta. I suspect Apple has big plans for Siri, but I'm not sure it will make it to the iPhone itself. Siri is just a child, as such expect it to grow.
Quote:
It is important though to recognize that connectivity is what makes smartphones "smart." I find it somewhat amusing when people show concern about the ability to load maps on their smartphone. These same people argue in favor of Internet radio rather than iTunes. If you don't have connectivity you don't have email, iMessage, MMS, SMS or telephone service. If you don't have connectivity you don't have GPS/GLONASS. If you don't have connectivity you don't have Siri. If you don't have connectivity you don't have... the Internet.
A smart phone doesn't need connectivity to be useful. It especially doesn't need connectivity for GPS. Connectivity doesn't make a smart phone smart any more than an Internet connection for a laptop makes it smart. Connectivity is great for pulling in information but that isn't a measure of smartness.
Quote:
I don't understand the Android-based smartphone proponent mindset. The Apple iPhone 4S is still demonstrably better overall than any other smartphone on the market even today.
Software is important, in fact, Apple has made some decent improvements to core services in iOS 6 providing an improved user experience.

Yeah each rev of iOS also works on a few older models of iOS devices. It is far easier and far more affordable to stay current with Apple software than it is in the Android camp. I've been an iOS customer for a very long time now and have seen dramtic changes to iOS, it just looks to get better with time, something Android doesn't do unless you buy new hardware.
post #93 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Higher clock speeds are likely. A-15 is an interesting platform but I simply don't see it as a long term play, especially when things like iPad could migrate to 64 bit tomorrow and keep Apple well ahead of the industry.
Your question is interesting though, does Apple go with more cores or much higher clock speeds? I suspect more cores with slightly higher clock speeds are the way forward. The slightly higher clock speed would benefit apps that are hard to parallelize while the majority of apps can benefit from more cores. Cores are good for power management too.
Not at all! What I'm saying is that Apple has the resources to partner with Imagination to bring Rogue to market before anybody else. Further Apple owns enough of Imagination to get the access they need, something like 12% of the company. It isn't so much procurement as it is a partnership, they would combine resources to integrate Rogue into the next SoC. that is if Apple even goes that route. I'm still thinking we will see a split sometime in the future where tablet processors and cell phone processors go in slightly different directions with a greater stress on low power in the cell phone processor.
In a nut shell it is very hard to tell from the outside if Roque is ready to go or not.
I have to admit that LTE works great on my iPad even if it is on AT&T. Frankly iPad has replaced my iPhone for some of those uses you describe. The difference between Maps on an iPad and on the iPhone makes such use on iPhone trying.
32 nm is great as long as it is actually used to lower power usage. It is very possible that they might take any power improvements and burn those improvements up on improved performance and new features.
As to FaceTime, I've never used it and don't have a dying desire to use it.
Improved that is for sure I just don't see a reason to focus on pixel count. Like I said if they do anything I'd like to see an improved low light capability and maybe even an optical zoom. Even a good 2X optical zoom would blow away anything that more pixels would offer. Especially if those pixels result in a regression in image quality.
They can't innovate because the stole everything from Apple.
It was my understanding that Apple was talking to TSMC about sub 20 nm processes. I would imagine their contract with Sansung is long term.
I think the key here is to look at the SoC as a whole. I don't think Apple would go with a Heterogenous architecture with A9 cores, instead such an effort would likely go into the 64 bit core. The reason is simple, that would be a lot of effort on the part of all three partners, you would not want to waste such effort on old core technology.
I suspect more special purpose functionality will go into the next iPhone SoC. One item being a new hardware decoder for that latest video standard. It AI possible that they might add extra capability to the ARM cores possibly accelerators for Objective C code. Higher clock speeds go hand in hand with process shrinks and are needed no matter what.
no not a consummer feature but it does help developers deliver better code
There is a reason they call Siri a beta. I suspect Apple has big plans for Siri, but I'm not sure it will make it to the iPhone itself. Siri is just a child, as such expect it to grow.
A smart phone doesn't need connectivity to be useful. It especially doesn't need connectivity for GPS. Connectivity doesn't make a smart phone smart any more than an Internet connection for a laptop makes it smart. Connectivity is great for pulling in information but that isn't a measure of smartness.
Yeah each rev of iOS also works on a few older models of iOS devices. It is far easier and far more affordable to stay current with Apple software than it is in the Android camp. I've been an iOS customer for a very long time now and have seen dramtic changes to iOS, it just looks to get better with time, something Android doesn't do unless you buy new hardware.

We seem to agree about everything except what makes a "smartphone" a smartphone. Apple today introduced iPhone, combining three products—a revolutionary mobile phone, a widescreen iPod® with touch controls, and a breakthrough Internet communications device with desktop-class email, web browsing, searching and maps—into one small and lightweight handheld device. (1) While technically speaking GPS/GLONASS doesn't require an Internet connection, Maps is worthless without an Internet connection (at this time). "Smartphone" is simply a nomenclature applied to a mobile phone with more functions than a feature phone.

1. Unattributed. 9 January 2007. MACWORLD SAN FRANCISCO. Apple.
post #94 of 97

"Apple has demanded full-lamination between the panel and the cover glass," Kuo wrote. "Lamination for the relatively large 27-inch panel comes with a lower yield, so we expect the 27-inch iMac to trail 21.5-inch iMac by 6-8 weeks in hitting the marketplace."

 

Im amazed if they keep that small screensize... Who wants a small screen like that on a desktop??? They ought to put a 23-24" inch model out instead. The 27" is too big for some.
 

post #95 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post


We seem to agree about everything except what makes a "smartphone" a smartphone. Apple today introduced iPhone, combining three products—a revolutionary mobile phone, a widescreen iPod® with touch controls, and a breakthrough Internet communications device with desktop-class email, web browsing, searching and maps—into one small and lightweight handheld device. (1) While technically speaking GPS/GLONASS doesn't require an Internet connection, Maps is worthless without an Internet connection (at this time). "Smartphone" is simply a nomenclature applied to a mobile phone with more functions than a feature phone.
1. Unattributed. 9 January 2007. MACWORLD SAN FRANCISCO. Apple.

 

I look at it this way Maps is not the only solution to using GPS on an iPhone.   People have this idea that GPS is useless without Apples Maps or an internet connection this is not the case at all.   The reality is that even if your device suddenly looses an internet connection it doesn't make it any less of a smart phone.   Some apps might loose a bit of functionality but the breadth of apps means that you will have a usable smart phone until those internet services can be restored.   

 

In the end the internet is just a service exploited by your smart phone.

post #96 of 97

For some a 21 inch screen is awfully big as is.   

Quote:
Originally Posted by habi View Post

"Apple has demanded full-lamination between the panel and the cover glass," Kuo wrote. "Lamination for the relatively large 27-inch panel comes with a lower yield, so we expect the 27-inch iMac to trail 21.5-inch iMac by 6-8 weeks in hitting the marketplace."

 

Im amazed if they keep that small screensize... Who wants a small screen like that on a desktop??? They ought to put a 23-24" inch model out instead. The 27" is too big for some.
 

post #97 of 97
After getting used to my 32" HDTV, a 21" iMac seems small.
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