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Apple iOS 6 Maps cuts Google's exclusive lock on directions, opens door to third party apps

post #1 of 66
Thread Starter 
The new Maps in iOS 6 introduces new turn by turn navigation for drivers and walkers, but opens up transit and other specialized directions to third parties, cutting Apple's exclusive partnership with Google for all other types of directions for the first time.

Apple's strategy of taking its Maps solo in iOS 6 was initially described in Apple wants to wipe Google off the map with iOS 6, while a second segment detailed how the company will be leveraging vector graphics to greatly improve the Maps experience in iOS and a third segment outlined how Apple is adding 3D Flyover features to displace Google's Street View.

Apple gives Google directions to the door



In the area of directions, Apple is similarly cutting Google out of its prime position as the exclusive source of iOS Maps directions. As noted previously, Google itself introduced the new Maps Navigation for Android 2.0 in 2009, with a series of new mapping features including voice prompted, turn-by-turn navigation features; voice search; searching for items along a plotted route and 3D models (below).



Apple initially appeared set to adopt those features as it had with Street View in the previous year. In late 2009, a Google spokesperson told AppleInsider, "Apple is a close partner. Millions of users experience Google Maps on the iPhone. We will continue to work with Apple to bring innovation, including Latitude and Navigation, to users but you'll have to speak to Apple about availability."

However, Apple never added Google's Navigation features to its own iOS Maps client, instead shunning them along with Google Latitude, Places, 3D models and subsequent other map enhancements that Google hoped Apple would spread across its iOS user base. Instead, though a series of acquisitions and partnerships, Apple built a complete in-house replacement for Google's maps and all of its related services.

Turn


Driving directions



For driving and walking directions, Apple appears to be drawing information from GPS and map provider TomTom, which itself includes a long list of regionally-specific licensing deals under iOS 6 Map's acknowledgments.

When you perform a request for driving directions, Apple presents a few alternative paths to choose from, just as it does in the current maps. You can explore this selection of driving routes, freely panning around, rotating the map or entering 3D mode to compare each of the suggested paths.



Once you select a given route and click Start, Maps jumps into its turn-by-turn mode, with the voice of Siri audibly guiding you along the path. You can at any point toggle between 2D and 3D views (shown below). Nearby road names are called out in large "street sign" banners, reducing the need to zoom in or look in detail at the map while plotting a course in your car. Ideally, you would follow the path via Siri's voice rather than watching the screen, something that the new Maps finally makes possible (and which Google has supplied for Android since 2009).



Once in turn-by-turn mode, you can't arbitrarily pan around or rotate the map because the view is updated dynamically as you move along your route, following the GPS. You can zoom in and out, but not very much.



This means that once you start, if you want to preview an upcoming segment on the path, you either have to zoom out enough to see it (and the zoomed out view is limited to showing only a roughly four to six block radius) or switch to the Overview mode (below left, which supports the same free exploration of the 2D or 3D map, along or outside of your route) or Route Overview (below right, which provides a descriptive listing of turns).



You can exit the Maps app while a path is being navigated; when you do, iOS provides a green "touch to return to Navigation" banner, similar to a phone call, voice recording or other background task.

On page 2 of 3: Siri Integration, Live traffic information

Siri Integration



Unsurprisingly, when you ask Siri about nearby locations or for directions, you can jump right into Maps to find your way to there, with Siri voicing your turns along the way. And conversely, when you ask Siri about nearby locations (such as a gas station) while being directed to a destination, Siri will respond with results along your path (below)



This integration is the basis for Apple's "Eyes Free" initiative to enable car makers to delegate navigation and related features to a linked iOS device, operating in Siri's voice-only mode to avoid visual distractions while driving.

Eyes Free


Live traffic information



Along with suggesting alternative driving routes, iOS 6 Maps also tracks real time traffic information and updates its estimated arrival time dynamically as this data changes. In the case of an accident or change in traffic, Apple says Maps will suggest route alternatives along with way, too, just as dedicated GPS systems do.

Similarly, if you take a different turn than what is suggested, Maps will recalculate a new path. Apple first revealed its plans for "collecting anonymous traffic data to build a crowd-sourced traffic database" in April of last year, noting that it planned to launch an "improved traffic service in the next couple of years."

The new iOS 6 Maps in development already demonstrates the beginnings of this new infrastructure with red highlighting on the map where traffic is moving slow (below left), and indicating traffic issues along alternative paths before you being your trip (below right). Once the installed base of iPhone users migrates to iOS 6, Apple will have tremendous amounts of real time data to present and use in calculating routes for Maps users.



On the flip side, Google will also begin losing the constant updates it gets from iOS clients, forcing it to rely on the subset of Android users who get their data from Google. It's noteworthy that a variety of Android devices are already hardwired to alternative mapping systems, including the recent mapping partnership between Amazon and Nokia.

On page 3 of 3: Walking & Transit directions

Walking directions



Walking directions are different from driving directions in a few respects. First of all, the given path is actually sensible for walking, rather than just being the driving route with a longer estimated time.

Secondly, similar to Overview mode in driving directions, you can navigate around the map to any point along your highlighted route or explore around to view anywhere else you want to look at (noting live traffic alerts, below). There's also the standard Location button to jump back to your current position, or, when touched a second time, enter compass mode to show your current facing location on the map (as existing Maps work).



You can also preview each segment of your walking route by swiping through the series of "street sign" turn indicators. You can also activate 3D mode (below left) or even Flyover aerial views (below right) and zoom in to get a sense of what buildings and other landmarks you will be (or currently are) walking past.



Unfortunately, there's no single button to push to toggle between walking and driving modes; you have to end one set of directions and calculate the new route, which feels like a hassle but realistically just amounts to three taps: the End/Cancel button, the Directions icon, and then new mode you want to enter: walking, driving or transit.

Transit directions



Apple's new iOS 6 Maps doesn't handle transit directions natively any more. In June, Apple's iOS software chief Scott Forstall explained why, when he told developers at WWDC:

"When building Maps, we looked around and realized the best transit apps for metros, for hiking, for biking, are coming from our developers. And so instead of trying to develop those ourselves, we are going to integrate and feature and promote your apps for transit right within the Maps app in iOS 6."

And so, for the first time since the debut of the iPhone, when you look up transit directions in Maps you won't be automatically directed to Google. Instead, you'll have to select third party helper apps to provide these types of alternative directions. The way Apple has implemented this allows third parties (including Google) to all compete for you attention, resulting in a more level playing field, more options, and competition for features and accuracy.

Currently, Google relies on its own internal algorithms to calculate transit directions in a wide variety of cities. While Maps is limited to transit-only directions in iOS 5 and earlier, Google also has data on how to bike around or hike off-road paths. None of these have ever been visible in iOS Maps, however. Now, if Google chooses to, it can (as can others).

Being able to pick your own specialized third party sources for transit and other transportation modes is great because Google's aren't always the best. In San Francisco, for example, the local Muni system of busses, trains and cable and trolley cars actually provides public "NextBus" realtime arrival data that is generally quite accurate, using GPS devices outfitted on each vehicle. But Google doesn't use this data for some reason.

The result is that if you compare Google's information on the next available Muni bus with any third party apps that do tap into this system, you get very different data (with the potential difference of getting to work on time or not).

However, until now there hasn't been any way to tell Maps that you prefer routing information from a source other than Google. In iOS 6, you'll now be able to look up a variety of apps capable of providing specialized directions for specific areas, and integrate them into the options available in Maps, without having to switch between each app to compare the routing information it has. Of course, because iOS 6 isn't out yet there's no way to search the App Store for Maps-savvy options (options are currently blank, below).



Rest assured that the wide range of transit, biking and hiking apps will jump on the opportunity to compete with Google for your attention. There's also the potential for linking other transportation modes into Maps, enabling specialized routing information options ranging from navigating a mall to charting a path across a ski resort to possibly even finding the cheapest route between cities when deciding between flying or taking a train.

As Forstall noted to developers in the audience at WWDC, "registering as a routing app gives you more opportunities to get your app in front of users. Routing apps are not limited to just driving or walking directions. Routing apps can also include apps that provide directions for the user's favorite bicycle or hiking trail, for air routes, and for subway or other public transportation lines."
post #2 of 66

I wonder if those subtle, semi-abstract window/stripe patterns on the white buildings are entirely random, or if someone actually assigned a specific appropriate window style to each building?

post #3 of 66
Bus stops, bike routes would be a cool enhancement.

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post #4 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

I wonder if those subtle, semi-abstract window/stripe patterns on the white buildings are entirely random, or if someone actually assigned a specific appropriate window style to each building?

Recognizing patterns where there really are none is... well... up to interpretation I suppose.

Edit: I gave it some thought. I believe it could be an algorithm based on H x L x W. That's the only pattern I see.
post #5 of 66
I love the idea of all the map changes and especially the turn by turn feature, which has to be the biggest draw card for purchasing a new iPhone. Unfortunately, while many countries are getting turn by turn, Australia is not. So I can't see a major reason to upgrade at this time. The 4s is near as dammit, almost as good.
post #6 of 66
Code:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Bus stops, bike routes would be a cool enhancement.

I'm just curious. Do your really use them or are you just saying that?

Bike routes for what? They're kind of limited in New England. There are "bike paths" here. Mostly they're just old railroad tracks that have been paved over. Everyone knows where they start, end, and what's along the route so maybe I'm missing the point. There's also trails that are used by power companies and gas line companies. Is that what you mean?

However, I'm going out west soon and have read about some bike paths, but they're mostly in 'desert like' landscapes. It would be cool, but is there service there? Like Tombstone and the Red Wood forrest and such? I'm pretty athletic, but I'm certainly not biking from Tombstone to California. States are closer together here!

Edit: edited my post.
Edited by Vadania - 9/5/12 at 12:25am
post #7 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdekok View Post

The 4s is near as dammit, almost as good.

From what I understand, the 4S will handle iOS 6 just fine. So you will have all of these features. No need to upgrade! 1smile.gif
post #8 of 66

I really hope Google publishes their own 3rd party app for Google Maps on the iPhone. It's so much better than the current Apple one. And yes I'm talking about the ios6 one

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post #9 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaroonMushroom View Post

I really hope Google publishes their own 3rd party app for Google Maps on the iPhone. It's so much better than the current Apple one. And yes I'm talking about the ios6 one

 

I think that's a done deal. Apple won't shut out Google any more than they would shut out Amazon or Microsoft. 

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post #10 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vadania View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

I wonder if those subtle, semi-abstract window/stripe patterns on the white buildings are entirely random, or if someone actually assigned a specific appropriate window style to each building?

Recognizing patterns where there really are none is... well... up to interpretation I suppose.

Edit: I gave it some thought. I believe it could be an algorithm based on H x L x W. That's the only pattern I see.

 

 

Here ya' go:

 

Click images to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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post #11 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vadania View Post

Code:
I'm just curious. Do your really use them or are you just saying that?
Bike routes for what? They're kind of limited in New England. There are "bike paths" here. Mostly they're just old railroad tracks that have been paved over. Everyone knows where they start, end, and what's along the route so maybe I'm missing the point. There's also trails that are used by power companies and gas line companies. Is that what you mean?
However, I'm going out west soon and have read about some bike paths, but they're mostly in 'desert like' landscapes. It would be cool, but is there service there? Like Tombstone and the Red Wood forrest and such? I'm pretty athletic, but I'm certainly not biking from Tombstone to California. States are closer together here!
Edit: edited my post.

Bicycle commuting is fairly common in Northwestern cities with a dense network of bike paths and bike lanes. Routing for these is different from driving, because not all streets have bike lanes, and obviously some streets/highways are not bike-friendly or legal.

post #12 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vadania View Post

I'm just curious. Do your really use them or are you just saying that?
Bike routes for what? They're kind of limited in New England. There are "bike paths" here. Mostly they're just old railroad tracks that have been paved over. Everyone knows where they start, end, and what's along the route so maybe I'm missing the point. There's also trails that are used by power companies and gas line companies. Is that what you mean?
However, I'm going out west soon and have read about some bike paths, but they're mostly in 'desert like' landscapes. It would be cool, but is there service there? Like Tombstone and the Red Wood forrest and such? I'm pretty athletic, but I'm certainly not biking from Tombstone to California. States are closer together here!
Edit: edited my post.

 

I'm not sure if you were only referring to bike lanes in New England, but in case you didn't, I can inform you that the world is a whole lot bigger than New England. Having bike lanes and cycle routes in iOS 6 maps would be a huge plus where I'm from, as we have them everywhere you go. You could plan nice scenic bike trips, and almost always there are much shorter (and nicer) routes possible if you use 'hidden' bike lanes through car-free areas. If iOS maps would only suggest routes suited for car traffic, it would almost always come up with suboptimal, longer routes.

post #13 of 66

Directions and turn by turn is only 10% of the usage of the Map app. 

 

We need business directory. And an international one. Yelp is only covering a very small part of it and is non existent in many countries. This has to be improved so that Apple map can be accepted. 

 

Meanwhile, apple map has to be available online from any navigator and usable like google map. Not only on iOS. 

 

A lot to improve....

post #14 of 66

I just hope it doesnt suck, like Siri, outside of USA 

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post #15 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdekok View Post

I love the idea of all the map changes and especially the turn by turn feature, which has to be the biggest draw card for purchasing a new iPhone. Unfortunately, while many countries are getting turn by turn, Australia is not. So I can't see a major reason to upgrade at this time. The 4s is near as dammit, almost as good.

This is almost certainly false. Apple Maps in iOS 6 Beta 4 provides turn-by-turn navigation for the continent and country known as Australia (to which I assume you refer). In fact, Maps provides 3D Flyover for Sydney and Melbourne as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Palex19 View Post

Directions and turn by turn is only 10% of the usage of the Map app. 

We need business directory. And an international one. Yelp is only covering a very small part of it and is non existent in many countries. This has to be improved so that Apple map can be accepted. 

Meanwhile, apple map has to be available online from any navigator and usable like google map. Not only on iOS. 

A lot to improve....

Apple Maps has more business listings than Google Maps. According to Scott Forstall, "... we’ve already ingested more than 100 million business listings around the world to make a great local search.” (1) 1rolleyes.gif

Why would Apple provide their best-in-class solution to competitor's platforms? Google didn't provide their catalog of mapping and navigation features to competitor's platforms.

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post #16 of 66

Another hilariously biased story from DED.  I love they way the omission of transit directions from iOS is a good thing, because it opens up it all up to third parties, but the inclusion of Apple's in house turn by turn is absolutely wonderful. What about all those third party turn by turn apps?  Not so wonderful for those guys eh?  

 

I know it's a DED article so my expectations are at rock bottom, and yet this guy still amazes will his amateurish style. 

 

I really hope Google come out with a new maps app soon, which includes all their latest stuff. If that happens, it would be fascinating to get a break down of how many iOS6 users were using Google's maps, vs Apple's maps in 6 months time.

post #17 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Bus stops, bike routes would be a cool enhancement.

That is apparently being left to third parties. That's why the article mentions opening it up to third parties.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdekok View Post

I love the idea of all the map changes and especially the turn by turn feature, which has to be the biggest draw card for purchasing a new iPhone. Unfortunately, while many countries are getting turn by turn, Australia is not. So I can't see a major reason to upgrade at this time. The 4s is near as dammit, almost as good.

First, how are you sure that Australia won't get turn by turn?

Second, the 4S is almost as good as what? The iPhone 5? How would you know that when the specs aren't available?
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post #18 of 66

The problem with the Tom Tom is that it doesn't cover as much as other map and directions providers. As an example, Iceland is not covered by Tom Tom, while the country is well covered by Garmin, Google maps and Nokia's navigation system.

 

Hopefully with Apple's added business Tom Tom will expand their coverage.

post #19 of 66
Thank you, AppleInsider, for putting space between your screenshots!
post #20 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

I love they way the omission of transit directions from iOS is a good thing, because it opens up it all up to third parties, but the inclusion of Apple's in house turn by turn is absolutely wonderful. What about all those third party turn by turn apps?  Not so wonderful for those guys eh?  

 

 

 

I don't see the problem with this. Apple knows they can nail down the turn by turn integration in their own polished style. Public transit, on the other hand, is clearly a much more complicated beast that they don't currently have the time/resources to implement in an acceptably polished way. This is a great tradeoff/compromise for the user. It's not like Apple will all of a sudden kick all the currently available turn by turn apps out of the app store or anything. Expecting Apple to allow 3rd party apps to integrate deeply with the OS as Android does is simply wishful thinking- Apple cares too much about a polished/seamless user experience to allow that- they always have. Frankly, I'm very surprised they are, apparently, allowing these 3rd party transit apps to 'plug in' to the native maps app.

post #21 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vadania View Post

Recognizing patterns where there really are none is... well... up to interpretation I suppose.
Edit: I gave it some thought. I believe it could be an algorithm based on H x L x W. That's the only pattern I see.
It might be to make separate but touching buildings easier to identify based on the Four Color Theorem.
post #22 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by sessamoid View Post

Bicycle commuting is fairly common in Northwestern cities with a dense network of bike paths and bike lanes. Routing for these is different from driving, because not all streets have bike lanes, and obviously some streets/highways are not bike-friendly or legal.

 

Get developing the app and make a mint !!!!!!!!!

post #23 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

What about all those third party turn by turn apps?  Not so wonderful for those guys eh?

I've been using iOS 6 since beta 1 and I can't imagine giving up my Tom Tom app at this time. Perhaps if Siri makes it much easier to input driving directions I'll change my mind but I expect I'll continue using Tom Tom. But, yes, I can see how this will be more than sufficient for most people that it could hurt future sales of GPS apps.

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post #24 of 66

Without offline map capability, the GPS is basically useless once outside of the US.  No one will pay for the data charges to use it overseas.

post #25 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsdofny View Post

Without offline map capability, the GPS is basically useless once outside of the US.  No one will pay for the data charges to use it overseas.

Huh?

What about the people who live overseas - many of whom have unlimited data plans? No need to be US-centric in your views.
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post #26 of 66

Hurrah! Now I can pay for something that every other Smart Phone user gets for free! Thanks Apple!

post #27 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsdofny View Post

Without offline map capability, the GPS is basically useless once outside of the US.  No one will pay for the data charges to use it overseas.

so buy navigon. $30 when you can catch it on sale.

 

i've used it in the USA in place where there is no AT&T or verizon signal

post #28 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by cycomiko View Post

I just hope it doesnt suck, like Siri, outside of USA 


Probably it will suck outside of USA in the first couple of years!

post #29 of 66

Absolutely gorgeous. I can't wait.

post #30 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonshf View Post

The problem with the Tom Tom is that it doesn't cover as much as other map and directions providers. As an example, Iceland is not covered by Tom Tom, while the country is well covered by Garmin, Google maps and Nokia's navigation system.

 

Hopefully with Apple's added business Tom Tom will expand their coverage.

It's not just international coverage though, TomTom's maps (in the USA at least) significantly lag others, including Google. For example, the road I cycle down every morning to go to work, according to TomTom (and Apple's new Maps app), does not exist. Most damningly, when you turn on the satellite hybrid view, the road, fully populated with houses, can be clearly seen in the satellite imagery that Apple is using (much higher resolution than Googles for the record), but not in TomTom's database. That satellite imagery for my neighborhood is at least 2-3 years old judging by the construction projects. I've been a TomTom owner (car GPS) for about 6 years, and it's always been my impression that TomTom's mapping is way out of date compared to others. Not the best partner for Apple to pick IMHO.

post #31 of 66

To me the article made this whole system seem rather complicated.  I'm going to assume that in real world use, directions will be straightforward.

post #32 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vadania View Post

Code:
I'm just curious. Do your really use them or are you just saying that?
Bike routes for what? They're kind of limited in New England. There are "bike paths" here. Mostly they're just old railroad tracks that have been paved over. Everyone knows where they start, end, and what's along the route so maybe I'm missing the point. There's also trails that are used by power companies and gas line companies. Is that what you mean?
However, I'm going out west soon and have read about some bike paths, but they're mostly in 'desert like' landscapes. It would be cool, but is there service there? Like Tombstone and the Red Wood forrest and such? I'm pretty athletic, but I'm certainly not biking from Tombstone to California. States are closer together here!
Edit: edited my post.

I use them, especially when I'm in a city I am not familiar with, such as when I am on vacation. The current iOS maps program has bus stops along with info about which routes each stop services. I found that I could also visit the city's mass transit web site to get the same info (but if it isn't optimized for small screens, then I'm pinching and zooming and scrolling like crazy), but current Maps shows you where you are in relation to each bus stop, which is pretty cool. I can look across the street see a bus stop and look in maps and know where that bus is going.

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post #33 of 66

Am I the only one that is disgusted with both this apple mapping program and googles in terms of scale?  Why can't these guys include a simple reference scale at the bottom, like any other map in the world?  What's 1 mile?  What's 10 miles?  It's impossible to tell without a scale!!

post #34 of 66

This should be made available via the web as well as the iPhone app. Too bad they already use maps.apple.com to advertise the app.

post #35 of 66
Originally Posted by Alexmit View Post
This should be made available via the web as well as the iPhone app.

 

Why? This sells hardware. That doesn't.

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post #36 of 66
Quote:
Bike routes for what? They're kind of limited in New England. There are "bike paths" here. Mostly they're just old railroad tracks that have been paved over. Everyone knows where they start, end, and what's along the route so maybe I'm missing the point. There's also trails that are used by power companies and gas line companies. Is that what you mean?

 

Yes, you are missing the point.

 

(I mean that in the nicest possible way).

For example, here are all of our bike routes:

http://www.oregonmetro.gov/index.cfm/go/by.web/id=38177

 

Routing for bicycle is different than car, some reasons people have already mentioned but also because many places there are streets which dead-end for autos but are open for bike/ped access.  The end of my street (for example) is a dead end for cars but has two paths which open to the next street over.  To get across in auto directions the mapping utility would map all the way around and outside of the neighborhood - while the biking or walking directions can cut right through.

 

Same thing with parks or schools, you can't drive through them but you can bike or ride through them.

 

Lots of ways that bike routing is different than car routing.

 

Check this out:

http://www.ridethecity.com/portland

 

for bicycle route planning.

post #37 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

Another hilariously biased story from DED.  I love they way the omission of transit directions from iOS is a good thing, because it opens up it all up to third parties, but the inclusion of Apple's in house turn by turn is absolutely wonderful. What about all those third party turn by turn apps?  Not so wonderful for those guys eh?  

 

I know it's a DED article so my expectations are at rock bottom, and yet this guy still amazes will his amateurish style. 

 

I really hope Google come out with a new maps app soon, which includes all their latest stuff. If that happens, it would be fascinating to get a break down of how many iOS6 users were using Google's maps, vs Apple's maps in 6 months time.

 

Where does the article opine anything about turn by turn being "absolutely wonderful"? It is only a factual outline of how it works.

 

It seems that if someone has a bias problem, it is a certain anonymous commenter who is billowing contradictory opinions. You say turn by turn is "Not so wonderful" for GPS apps, then turn around and say how excited you are to get Google's 2009 Maps Navigation, which only exists for Android. When you act all righteously indignant about supposed "bias," it makes you look like a raging hypocrite as a fanboy. Why can't you just say you disagree and state your opinions? Or are you afraid nobody cares what a nobody with no track record thinks? 

post #38 of 66

Perhaps its not clear what opening up alternative routing to third party apps means.

 

The App Store is full of apps that show transit/bike/hiking routes, some in specific areas or on specific systems. So Bart.gov has an app, there are general purpose biking apps, some apps that only show trails in a specific county.

 

With iOS 6 Maps, you'll be able to look up apps that can integrate with Maps to provide specialized routing information right within Maps. As it is, Google provides only transit directions for iOS 5 and earlier. For subways that run on time (like Bart), this works pretty well. For SF Muni, it's a disaster. Google shows the wrong information! You have to look up NextMuni on the web or pull up a separate app like Routsey.

 

With iOS 6, you can tell Maps to consult with an app like Routesy to find you the most appropriate routes, rather than only getting Google's (often incorrect) data.

post #39 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

Another hilariously biased story from DED.  I love they way the omission of transit directions from iOS is a good thing, because it opens up it all up to third parties, but the inclusion of Apple's in house turn by turn is absolutely wonderful. What about all those third party turn by turn apps?  Not so wonderful for those guys eh?  

 

I know it's a DED article so my expectations are at rock bottom, and yet this guy still amazes will his amateurish style. 

 

I really hope Google come out with a new maps app soon, which includes all their latest stuff. If that happens, it would be fascinating to get a break down of how many iOS6 users were using Google's maps, vs Apple's maps in 6 months time.


Agreed.  I don't like the idea of having to pick a 3rd-party app for transit, even in my home area.  Today, for example, there are multiple Caltrain apps, each with their pluses and minuses. Awkward to be forced to pick one to be the interface for Maps.

 

And that's just one (of many) transit modes in one metro area.  If I go to Boston and land at Logan, and want to take transit to Cambridge... how will I know which Beantown 3rd party app is best to guide me on the T -- especially when I have to do that analysis while I'm jostling to get off a plane, find my luggage, etc.

 

Also, will these 3rd party transit apps interact well with each other?  If I want to go from Mountain View to Berkeley, will it know to tell me to take Caltrain to point X, and then transfer to BART (and will the scheduling information for each mesh)?  I have to suppose that the answer is "yes", or the product will be hugely panned... but it just seems like a lot of potential hassle and confusion for little benefit (other than Apple not needing to spend some of its banked billions itself to add transit directly into the new Maps).

post #40 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uninterested_Viewer View Post

Public transit, on the other hand, is clearly a much more complicated beast that they don't currently have the time/resources to implement in an acceptably polished way.

 

Yeah, 'cause sitting on more money than any other company on the planet really crimps your ability to implement ideas.

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  • Apple iOS 6 Maps cuts Google's exclusive lock on directions, opens door to third party apps
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