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American Airlines pilots begin using Apple's iPad during all phases of flight - Page 2

post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjcampbell View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

 

I don't think that is quite correct. Even though in theory they can measure high speeds (which would be limited by their ability to keep the shifting signals locked - a processing limitation rather than a speed of light limitation), I believe that civilian GPS units are required under ITAR not to report speeds in excess of 1000 km/hr to prevent them being used for weapons system applications.

Only for GPS units capable of functioning above 18,000 meters altitude. The limit is 515 meters/second (1001 knots). And those limits apply only to GPS units built for export. Otherwise you need a State Department export license to export the GPS. You can get a permit for darned near anything these days.

 

Thanks for the clarification.

post #42 of 47

If your plane goes down and you have an iPad instead of your 35 pound flight bag, watch Archer on Netflix. It's hilarious.

post #43 of 47

I am a pilot who uses the ipad3 (also had an ipad2) and iphone4S in the cockpit all the time.  The GPS signal is rock solid, as long as you have a relatively clear line-of-sight between the unit and the window, sighting up toward the satellites.  You don't really need an outside or Bluetooth external antenna, although it certainly wouldn't hurt. Once it locks on, you can even put the ipad3 on the floor of the co-pilot's side, and it still works OK, even though you have obscured the line-of-sight drastically (but I haven't tested it much this way) - I typically have my ipad anchored to the pilot's yoke, right in front of me,and remove it for takeoff and landing, and place it on the co-pilot's seat, where is works perfectly also.  It also works on the commercial flights in the passenger seats, but is harder to maintain lock, due to the smaller windows of a passenger aircraft. (haven't been fortunate enough, yet, to fly in the new 787, which has the largest windows available so far - but hope to do so someday soon.).

 

Incidentally, it gives very accurate altitudes, since it is WAAS based GPS antenna accuracy.  If all my avionics and airspeed data went south on my aircraft (almost impossible, by the way), I plan on using the ipad as an emergency navigator, and many aviation sources have tested this out with fantastic results.  Nice piece-of-mind to have.


Edited by Bagman - 9/11/12 at 2:47pm
post #44 of 47
I am a retired commercial airline pilot and AVIONICS engineer. The reason airlines require passengers to "put away" all devices during critical phases of flight (below 10,000 feet) is that if there is an emergency there will be no flying debris. There is no interference from electronic devices.

I am very excited to see that commercial airlines are adopting EFB's. I tried to start a company called "Flight Page" in 2000 - 2001 but 9/11 pretty much killed that.

Ha I still have the prototype in my closet. An e-ink reader with special linux code to load the company manuals.

I know all the pilots are happy not carrying around those huge bags and having to do manual updates every week!

HCC Development

www.hccdevelopment.com

sales@hccdevelopment.com

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HCC Development

www.hccdevelopment.com

sales@hccdevelopment.com

Reply
post #45 of 47

Depends on the aircraft but generally, for commercial aircraft, no. The 777 windows block the signal quite well.

post #46 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bagman View Post

I am a pilot who uses the ipad3 (also had an ipad2) and iphone4S in the cockpit all the time.  The GPS signal is rock solid, as long as you have a relatively clear line-of-sight between the unit and the window, sighting up toward the satellites.  You don't really need an outside or Bluetooth external antenna, although it certainly wouldn't hurt. Once it locks on, you can even put the ipad3 on the floor of the co-pilot's side, and it still works OK, even though you have obscured the line-of-sight drastically (but I haven't tested it much this way) - I typically have my ipad anchored to the pilot's yoke, right in front of me,and remove it for takeoff and landing, and place it on the co-pilot's seat, where is works perfectly also.  It also works on the commercial flights in the passenger seats, but is harder to maintain lock, due to the smaller windows of a passenger aircraft. (haven't been fortunate enough, yet, to fly in the new 787, which has the largest windows available so far - but hope to do so someday soon.).

 

Incidentally, it gives very accurate altitudes, since it is WAAS based GPS antenna accuracy.  If all my avionics and airspeed data went south on my aircraft (almost impossible, by the way), I plan on using the ipad as an emergency navigator, and many aviation sources have tested this out with fantastic results.  Nice piece-of-mind to have.

The Boeing 777 cockpit windows block the signal. An external antenna would work, but they aren't certified by the FAA. So, no GPS at AA. The iPad has to be in Airplane mode, Wifi and Bluetooth OFF.

post #47 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

 

It doesn't really matter, the point of this isn't for using the GPS anyway.  The GPS on the aircraft will be far superior to the one built into the iPad, so they know physically where they are already.

 

What it's good for is having all the checklists, and constantly updated, the Airport/Facility Directory (that you are supposed to carry and always have an updated copy of), and all the maps.  For a cross country flight, the pilot will have IFR Enroute High and Low altitude charts, IFR Terminal Procedures publications, and relevant VFR Sectionals and Terminal Area Charts.  This stuff is all heavy, and it's worth noting that the charts expire every 6 months - keeping them updated is a pain in the arse.

 

As to the need to turn off electronics below 10,000ft, it's rules set by the airlines, with pathetic guidance from the FAA.  The relevant CFR is 14 CFR 91.21, which says all electronics devices (with a few minor exceptions) are banned on flights operating in Instrument Flight Conditions (so most scheduled flights), but that the Pilot in Command can make an exception to this rule if he/she deems it safe.

 

The FCC governs mobile phones (not the FAA), and they state, "Cellular telephones installed in or carried aboard airplanes, balloons or any other type of aircraft must not be operated while such aircraft are airborne (not touching the ground). When an aircraft leaves the ground, all cellular telephones on board that aircraft must be turned off."

 

Having been Pilot in Command of a light aircraft when a passenger didn't turn off their phone, I can say that the problem is the interference of the phone signal with your headphones.  Every time the phone communicated with the mast you could hear it in your headphones.  If it happened when you were trying to talk to a controller, it's very distracting, and if you fly around the Bay Area as I do, there is a lot of communications with the controllers to keep track of.

Pretty accurate except that it is a 2 week update rotation so it's a VERY big pain to keep them up to date. Consider a crewmember that has separate binders for Domestic, Pacific, Europe, South America. Each binder is about 3-4 inches thick, filled with very thin sheets of paper. The data is about 350mb for just the jeppeson approach plates. The enroute charts (maps) still have to be carried on paper but it's a far easier update and much less paper.

 

The big deal is that AA has permission to keep the iPad on below 10,000 feet for reference to approach plates, SID, STAR, Airport diagram, etc.

 

As for mounting, on the 777 it is mil-spec velcro with a specified half life. Both male and female sides have to be replaced on a regular basis. No "mounting" or permanent modification to the cockpit is allowed. Each Aircraft will be different, but the 777 has an empty "box" next to each pilot where Boeing intended a computer with display to go. Those were never purchased, so now iPads get velcroed to the lid of the box which contains kleenex and paper towels.

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