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Apple's 'iPhone 5' expected to hurt PC makers, existing LTE phones

post #1 of 116
Thread Starter 
The launch of Apple's new iPhone is predicted to have major implications throughout the personal electronics market, making existing LTE smartphones look bulky and subpar while taking away IT dollars from PC makers like Dell and HP.

Mark Moskowitz with J.P. Morgan on Monday took a look at the larger implications of Apple's anticipated "iPhone 5" debut. He believes the entire technology "food chain" will have winners and losers as a result of Apple's latest handset.

Some of the biggest losers out of the new iPhone launch will be competing smartphone makers who have existing 4G LTE handsets on the market. Moskowitz expects that Apple's so-called "iPhone 5" will offer better battery performance in a smaller form factor that will further label competing devices as battery and pocket "hogs."

While non-Apple handset makers will be negatively affected by the new iPhone, Moskowitz also believes Apple's latest smartphone will also hurt Windows-based PC makers. The analyst said Monday that the iPhone 5 will "sustain the land grab of smartphones taking IT dollars from PCs, dampening PC-related growth prospects at Dell, Hewlett-Packard, and other PC makers."

Event


The new iPhone is projected to mark one of the few secular growth stories for the semiconductor industry in the second half of 2012. With strong demand for the iPhone 5, companies like Fairchild Semiconductor, Qualcomm and Avago that supply components to Apple are expected to see benefits.

The new iPhone is also expected to benefit LG Display, which is believed to supply in-cell touchscreen panels; Samsung Electronics, which builds Apple's custom processors; and LG Innotek, which is believed to be supplying camera modules.

But the debut of turn-by-turn navigation in Apple's new Maps application for iOS 6 is forecast to have a negative effect on existing GPS service providers TeleNav, TeleCommunication Systems, and Garmin.

As for wireless carriers, Moskowitz expects upgrades to increase, which will have a negative effect on their margins. But in the longer term, the iPhone 5 is expected to accelerate the upgrade cycle to 4G LTE, particularly in the U.S. where the market is dominated by slower 3G phones.

As for Europe, the impact of 4G LTE is "unclear," Moskowitz said, as it is unknown whether the device will support European LTE frequencies. Regardless, he does not believe the new iPhone will be as disruptive with respect to 4G LTE in Europe.

On Monday, J.P. Morgan said massive sales of Apple's next iPhone could boost the U.S. gross domestic product. Economist Michael Feroli estimated that sales could add between one quarter and one half a percentage point to fourth-quarter annualized U.S. GDP growth in 2012.

Apple is expected to officially unveil its new iPhone on Wednesday at a media event scheduled for 10 a.m. Pacific, 1 p.m. Eastern. AppleInsider will have full, live coverage of the presentation.
post #2 of 116
In other news, scientists expect the sun to first appear on the eastern horizon tomorrow.

;-)
post #3 of 116
It's interesting to think about this in the context of the story from yesterday in which somebody said the iPhone 5 will add to growth. If the iPhone 5 just shifts demand from those other companies to Apple, then the net effect on growth could be very small.

This is a nice lesson in macro-economics and aggregate demand.
post #4 of 116

iPod, iPad, iPad2, iPad 3, iPad Mini, iPhone, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPhone 5, AppleTV (1,2 & 3), 13" MacBook Pro, 24" Cinema Display, Time Capsule, 21.5" iMac (Mid 2011)

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iPod, iPad, iPad2, iPad 3, iPad Mini, iPhone, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPhone 5, AppleTV (1,2 & 3), 13" MacBook Pro, 24" Cinema Display, Time Capsule, 21.5" iMac (Mid 2011)

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post #5 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Moskowitz expects that Apple's so-called "iPhone 5" will offer better battery performance in a smaller form factor that will further label competing devices as battery and pocket "hogs."
 

The screen size issue really needs to be a careful balance because if the screen gets up in the 4.5" range then it really doesn't fit in the pocket very well. I see a lot of Android phones in belt holster configurations. I have never tried one but it seems like that would be a conflict with auto seat belts.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #6 of 116
Oh Please... It's just another smartphone announcement - Nothing More/Nothing Less.

... and given Apple's rather slow adoption of many of the latest mobile technologies (e.g. LTE, NFC, larger displays, etc) the 'new ' iPhone will largely just be playing catch-up anyway.

Nice to (finally) see an iPhone update, but that's really ALL it is.
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
Reply
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
Reply
post #7 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

It's interesting to think about this in the context of the story from yesterday in which somebody said the iPhone 5 will add to growth. If the iPhone 5 just shifts demand from those other companies to Apple, then the net effect on growth could be very small.
This is a nice lesson in macro-economics and aggregate demand.

The story based on a report from a clown of an analyst that thought he was an economist? The report did prove he wasn't.
post #8 of 116
The iPhone always takes IT dollars away from the PC industry. People are far more likely to upgrade their iPhone than their PC each year, and its not a whole lot cheaper than buying a PC.

Also consider that this time around, being less than a year from the last iPhone launch, no iPhone 4S owner is eligible for an upgrade, so for a least the first month of sales, anyone upgrading will be paying twice the price of a normal iPhone purchase.
post #9 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

It's interesting to think about this in the context of the story from yesterday in which somebody said the iPhone 5 will add to growth. If the iPhone 5 just shifts demand from those other companies to Apple, then the net effect on growth could be very small.
This is a nice lesson in macro-economics and aggregate demand.

Is it reasonable to think that someone will choose an iPhone (instead of a cheap android) as their first smartphone? I don't think so. As such, the net effect on growth will be very small, indeed.

 

I believe that it is safe to assume that pretty much anyone that could afford (or will be able to afford in the near future) an iPhone already has a smartphone. This is why android market share will explode until all markets are saturated. After that 3 situations are plausible: 

 

1) Apple keeps their "small" 10% percentage of handset owners and makes lots of money.

 

2) Apple market share keeps rising as android and BB owners buy iPhones and apple makes lots of money.

 

3) Apple falls behind the curve RIM style and still makes lots of money, eventually.

 

For me, the mid-term between option 1 and 2 is the real deal, as high-end smartphone buyers will pretty much only use the iPhone when the market saturates (just like it happens on the PC market) and the rest won't be able to afford/justify these gadgets.

 

What do you think? Sorry for my english, I'm Portuguese.

post #10 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by oneaburns View Post

This pretty much sums up how I feel 1frown.gif
http://tech.lifegoesstrong.com/article/apple-iphone-5-ready-disappointment

what a lame ass article. The iphone 4S was a excellent upgrade from the 4, and it outsold every shitty ass droid phone by a wide margin. The next iphone will again outsell all others, and it's former iterations as well. If you were disappointed that Apple didn't consult you directly to make sure that their phone would be just exactly what you wanted - then too bad.

i am excited for the new iPhone. I will purchase 4 (mine, wife, daughter,mom-in-law) as soon as they are released.

android sucks, but not as much as the people who come here to defend it.

New for MS dorks - Microsoft sucks just as much as the losers that come to AI to defend it

Reply

android sucks, but not as much as the people who come here to defend it.

New for MS dorks - Microsoft sucks just as much as the losers that come to AI to defend it

Reply
post #11 of 116
I simply don't follow why iPhone 5 would impact PC sales. Different market, different set of buyers, different functionality. From recent reports, some super iPad could certainly alter PC buying habits, but not an iPhone 5.
post #12 of 116
"The new iPhone is projected to mark one of the few secular growth stories"

Secular growth stories? Are AI editors so hot and bothered about these fanboi analyst pronouncements that they don't even bother to proofread their articles?
post #13 of 116

I know a few people think it's fabulous to hold a 5"+ phone up to your face while making a phone call, but most people just think it's stupid and feel like clowns doing it. It's always been my contention that the only reason Android phones started sprouting bigger screens was to hide the fact that they needed to make the cases larger to hold the batteries they needed to get decent battery life. It's something of a trade-off, but by carefully choosing your resolutions and making the "phone" big enough, you can get enough battery life with a 4G phone to make it through the day. In other words, the gigantic screens Android phones are sporting lately are simply camouflage for big, unwieldy cases holding big batteries.

 

Assuming the new iPhone has 4G/LTE support, and a largely similar form factor, these jumbo-sized Android phones are going to become an increasingly tough sell. Sure, Android handset manufacturers will increase the spiffs they offer, carriers will still favor Android because it gives them more control of their customers and makes them more money, but only the most naive consumers and the handful of irrational zealots will be taken in by these games.

 

People simply don't want elephantine phones. They want them to be easily portable and easily operated with one hand. Remove any technical differences, like 4G support, and they'll choose the more elegant solution every time.

post #14 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

I know a few people think it's fabulous to hold a 5"+ phone up to your face while making a phone call, but most people just think it's stupid and feel like clowns doing it. It's always been my contention that the only reason Android phones started sprouting bigger screens was to hide the fact that they needed to make the cases larger to hold the batteries they needed to get decent battery life. It's something of a trade-off, but by carefully choosing your resolutions and making the "phone" big enough, you can get enough battery life with a 4G phone to make it through the day. In other words, the gigantic screens Android phones are sporting lately are simply camouflage for big, unwieldy cases holding big batteries.

 

Assuming the new iPhone has 4G/LTE support, and a largely similar form factor, these jumbo-sized Android phones are going to become an increasingly tough sell. Sure, Android handset manufacturers will increase the spiffs they offer, carriers will still favor Android because it gives them more control of their customers and makes them more money, but only the most naive consumers and the handful of irrational zealots will be taken in by these games.

 

People simply don't want elephantine phones. They want them to be easily portable and easily operated with one hand. Remove any technical differences, like 4G support, and they'll choose the more elegant solution every time.

a lot of people use very little minutes and rarely talk on the phone

the want the bigger screen because they mostly do SMS and data

post #15 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

Is it reasonable to think that someone will choose an iPhone (instead of a cheap android) as their first smartphone? I don't think so. As such, the net effect on growth will be very small, indeed.

 

I believe that it is safe to assume that pretty much anyone that could afford (or will be able to afford in the near future) an iPhone already has a smartphone. This is why android market share will explode until all markets are saturated. After that 3 situations are plausible: 

 

1) Apple keeps their "small" 10% percentage of handset owners and makes lots of money.

 

2) Apple market share keeps rising as android and BB owners buy iPhones and apple makes lots of money.

 

3) Apple falls behind the curve RIM style and still makes lots of money, eventually.

 

For me, the mid-term between option 1 and 2 is the real deal, as high-end smartphone buyers will pretty much only use the iPhone when the market saturates (just like it happens on the PC market) and the rest won't be able to afford/justify these gadgets.

 

What do you think? Sorry for my english, I'm Portuguese.

 

I actually do think it's reasonable to believe that somebody will pick an iPhone instead of a cheap android phone as their first smartphone. For example, I'm sure that when my niece and nephew are old enough to get smart phones, they'll get iPhones -- their family has the money and they already like Apple products. 

 

But that issue aside, I think it's interesting to note the massive difference between the U.S. and the rest of the world. The iPhone is the dominant smartphone in the US by far, whereas the roles are reversed in the rest of the world. Part of this is probably a price issue -- all smartphones in the US are expensive because of the nature of the contracts from the big three providers (AT&T, VZ, and Sprint), so iPhones don't seem any more expensive to Americans than Android phones. In the rest of the world where there's more competition among competitors and a greater diversity of price points, consumers see a bigger difference in price between the iPhone and Androids, so the iPhone doesn't do as well. 

 

But I think another big difference between the US and the rest of the world is that Apple's ecosystem is much better developed in the US. First, Apple's penetration of retail stores in the US is far higher than anywhere else in the world. This in and of itself is huge. Second, iCloud / iTunes / App Store development is best in the US. 

 

The conclusion I take from this is that if Apple were to greatly expand its retail presence in the rest of the world, get its online services up to the level they are in the US, and provide more appealing pricing options on entry level products (a pricing equivalent of the iPod nano, which could just be the iPhone 3GS continuing to be sold outside of the US at a low price), then Apple could dominate smartphones in the same way Apple dominated music players and is appearing to dominate tablets. 

post #16 of 116
I think they may be overestimating sales for the iPhone 5. It's bigger than an iPhone 4/S, and the tradeoff in new features simply isn't worth it (if you want a pocketable phone).
post #17 of 116
Originally Posted by oneaburns View Post
This pretty much sums up how I feel 1frown.gif
http://tech.lifegoesstrong.com/article/apple-iphone-5-ready-disappointment

 

Except you have absolutely no reason for that.


Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post
Oh Please... It's just another smartphone announcement - Nothing More/Nothing Less.
... and given Apple's rather slow adoption of many of the latest mobile technologies (e.g. LTE, NFC, larger displays, etc) the 'new ' iPhone will largely just be playing catch-up anyway.
Nice to (finally) see an iPhone update, but that's really ALL it is.

 

If this isn't proof that you should be banned immediately, there is no reason not to rename this place TrollInsider.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #18 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

a lot of people use very little minutes and rarely talk on the phone

the want the bigger screen because they mostly do SMS and data

 

But most of them still don't want to haul around a small tablet in their pockets or purse.

 

"Bigger is better" is just a testosterone fueled misconception that even most men grow out of. Not all, but most.

post #19 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by audioinside View Post

"The new iPhone is projected to mark one of the few secular growth stories"
Secular growth stories? Are AI editors so hot and bothered about these fanboi analyst pronouncements that they don't even bother to proofread their articles?

Please check your dictionary before flaming the editors.

post #20 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

But most of them still don't want to haul around a small tablet in their pockets or purse.

 

"Bigger is better" is just a testosterone fueled misconception that even most men grow out of. Not all, but most.

The iPhone iterations to date are too small.  That is why you will see Apple increasing the screen real estate now.  Apple lead us into the multi-touch smartphone world.  Now they are catching up.

post #21 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by LetsReason View Post

The iPhone iterations to date are too small.  That is why you will see Apple increasing the screen real estate now.  Apple lead us into the multi-touch smartphone world.  Now they are catching up.

 

Yes, that explains why the iPhone has been such a dismal failure to date. I don't know why I didn't see that.

 

It undermines your (baseless) contention more than a bit that it's hard to be playing catchup when the competition is copying you.

post #22 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

 

But that issue aside, I think it's interesting to note the massive difference between the U.S. and the rest of the world. The iPhone is the dominant smartphone in the US by far,....

 

I do believe it is clear that Android phones outnumber Apple phones in the US.  Maybe you could point to some current numbers online that provide evidence to the contrary.

post #23 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

Yes, that explains why the iPhone has been such a dismal failure to date. I don't know why I didn't see that.

 

It undermines your (baseless) contention more than a bit that it's hard to be playing catchup when the competition is copying you.

 

Baseless?  Watch.  12 <--- it is coming.  Now that Mr. Jobs is out of the picture...watch the "immaculate" iPhone adapt to copy others.  Please come back with the new measurements when you get your new 4+ inch iPhone.

post #24 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post
But I think another big difference between the US and the rest of the world is that Apple's ecosystem is much better developed in the US. First, Apple's penetration of retail stores in the US is far higher than anywhere else in the world. This in and of itself is huge. Second, iCloud / iTunes / App Store development is best in the US. 

 

I believe you're wrong on this point with respect to the United Kingdom, it is just as developed here.
 
There are 34 Apple Stores in the UK.
Additionally every mobile phone shop offers the iPhone and frequently the iPad, most sizeable supermarkets department stores and electronic/electrical chain shops have Apple products, be they iPhones, iPads, iPods or Macs.
 
The same services are available via iTunes, iCloud and App Store as in the US.
Besides, the internet makes where you physically develop an app in the world irrelevant, unless you wish to speak with developers face to face.
 
The only thing the UK lacks in the Apple ecosystem are one or two functions relating to Siri.
 
 
 
 
 
 
post #25 of 116

Bar none, the dumbest and worst explained AI article I've read thus far.

 

 

 

Quote:
Some of the biggest losers out of the new iPhone launch will be competing smartphone makers who have existing 4G LTE handsets on the market. Moskowitz expects that Apple's so-called "iPhone 5" will offer better battery performance in a smaller form factor that will further label competing devices as battery and pocket "hogs."

 

 

I've heard the argument that many competing phones are simply too big or too bulky to be comfortable. I completely agree, if you don't often carry a purse, or pants with large pockets, carting around a 5"+ phone is just inconvenient. However, the phone is that large due to screen size, not LTE capability. A larger battery certainly helps when using LTE as opposed to other communication standards, but saying the phone is big because of LTE completely misses the point. Furthermore, saying that the iPhone 5 will do better than the competition because they've brought LTE in a smaller form factor completely ignores the actual reasons why they've tried to keep the form factor small.

 

Quote:
But the debut of turn-by-turn navigation in Apple's new Maps application for iOS 6 is forecast to have a negative effect on existing GPS service providers TeleNav, TeleCommunication Systems, and Garmin.

 

In other news, scientists have new evidence that water may have a "wetting" effect on other materials it comes in contact with.

 

 

 

Quote:
As for wireless carriers, Moskowitz expects upgrades to increase, which will have a negative effect on their margins. But in the longer term, the iPhone 5 is expected to accelerate the upgrade cycle to 4G LTE, particularly in the U.S. where the market is dominated by slower 3G phones.

 

The market is dominated by slower 3G phones? This might be possible, if the article bothered explaining what it meant by 3G. HSPA, the technology that iPhones since the iPhone 3G used has been slowly improving over time, its theoretical peak speed is still above what LTE achieves today, and as such many carriers have just relegated to calling it 4G anyways. Despite this, there are still PLENTY of LTE phones in the United States, and all flagship android phones for the past year have been LTE based. The upgrade cycle is not going to be affected by the iPhone 5, its going to be affected by LTE coverage, once your phone leaves LTE coverage area, it switches back to HSPA, and if that fails, to GPRS, etc.  This statement is flat out wrong, since the area where the iPhone 5 might make the biggest effect is OUTSIDE the US (and north america in general), where LTE networks are just beginning to sprout.  Having a wide user base ready to take advantage of LTE makes the decision for carriers to build LTE infrastructure more appetizing.

Quote:

As for Europe, the impact of 4G LTE is "unclear," Moskowitz said, as it is unknown whether the device will support European LTE frequencies. Regardless, he does not believe the new iPhone will be as disruptive with respect to 4G LTE in Europe.

 

 

Refer to point above. Its like saying that the new Northface winter jacket design will not be disruptive to the Jamaican clothing industry.

 

Quote:

On Monday, J.P. Morgan said massive sales of Apple's next iPhone could boost the U.S. gross domestic product.

 

Unfortunately this means absolutely nothing in terms of benefits to the average American citizen. Since the vast majority is outsourced, whatever trickle-down effect that does occur will benefit populations outside the United States.

 

 

Completely irrelevant, useless, uninformative, and misleading article. If it wasn't for the colorful personalities on these forums, I wouldn't still be here.

post #26 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

 

But most of them still don't want to haul around a small tablet in their pockets or purse.

 

"Bigger is better" is just a testosterone fueled misconception that even most men grow out of. Not all, but most.

 

Some people like bigger screens. Not an insult to those that prefer smaller screens, just a reality. I'm sure that I enjoy my eggs cooked differently from yours, that doesn't necessitate that one of us is wrong.

post #27 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by oneaburns View Post

This pretty much sums up how I feel 1frown.gif
http://tech.lifegoesstrong.com/article/apple-iphone-5-ready-disappointment


Interesting article.  It's quite right in many respects.  Apple has such a following and they know pretty much whatever phone they put out will still by the millions.. they don't need to outdo themselves... sadly. 

 

I wish this phone would have been out a year ago.  If history repeats itself, we'll see this one tomorrow, and in about a year we'll get the "S" version that is slightly beefed up... and won't see anything really "new" from apple in the way of a new phone for another 24 months.

post #28 of 116

Obviously. Anything to do with Apple will impact the industry substantially. It's Apple. The industry *needs* Apple. It's shaped and directed by this one "fruit" company from Cupertino. 

 

No one gave a damn about that MS/Nokia conference or whatever. Did anyone really notice? But everyone, their dog, and the industry at large has tomorrow's date circled in bright red. 

post #29 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


If this isn't proof that you should be banned immediately, there is no reason not to rename this place TrollInsider.

What?

There's is nothing the least bit 'in violation of forum rules' presented anywhere in my post(s), and your not agreeing with it doesn't make it so, and only serves to further demonstrate your rampant disregard for all that actually makes for a suitable/fair forum moderator.

As I previously stated, "Nice to (finally) see an iPhone update, but that's really ALL it is".
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
Reply
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
Reply
post #30 of 116
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post
There's is nothing the least bit 'in violation of forum rules' presented anywhere in my post…

 

I never said there was.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #31 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Oh Please... It's just another smartphone announcement - Nothing More/Nothing Less.
... and given Apple's rather slow adoption of many of the latest mobile technologies (e.g. LTE, NFC, larger displays, etc) the 'new ' iPhone will largely just be playing catch-up anyway.
Nice to (finally) see an iPhone update, but that's really ALL it is.

 

Can't say I agree, this isn't the only analyst that expects record breaking iPhone sales.  I'm pretty sure they're not basing their projections on "gee whiz, people want a new phone."

 

My point being, this iPhone will have many features that will set it apart from all other iPhones, except for maybe the first.  Besides, Apple isn't always the "first to market" on mobile technologies, but when they implement them, it works better and easier (usually).  And I say that as someone who's owned Android and Apple phones.  And BB, too.

post #32 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Obviously. Anything to do with Apple will impact the industry substantially. It's Apple. The industry *needs* Apple. It's shaped and directed by this one "fruit" company from Cupertino. 

 

No one gave a damn about that MS/Nokia conference or whatever. Did anyone really notice? But everyone, their dog, and the industry at large has tomorrow's date circled in bright red. 

 

o.O...

 

Don't get me wrong, I really like Apple. They definitely have huge influence in dictating where the computer and electronic industries will go, but if they just up and disappear one day, someone else will take the reins. Life goes on.

 

As for the "MS/Nokia conference or whatever", it just wasn't talked about on this site, since this site is Apple-centric. Every other technology website covered it in large detail. 

 

Learn about other products as well, that way you can qualify reasons why you think Apple products are superior rather than using hyperbolies and generalizations. You might even find that Apple, like every other company, is not without its flaws.

post #33 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

The screen size issue really needs to be a careful balance because if the screen gets up in the 4.5" range then it really doesn't fit in the pocket very well. I see a lot of Android phones in belt holster configurations. I have never tried one but it seems like that would be a conflict with auto seat belts.

 

First of all, the new iPhone due to its longer case will not fit a shirt pocket (though my current iPhone-4 fits just right).

Second, the existing iPhone-4(S) had enough real estate for a 4.5" display.

post #34 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason98 View Post

 

First of all, the new iPhone due to its longer case will not fit a shirt pocket (though my current iPhone-4 fits just right).

Second, the existing iPhone-4(S) had enough real estate for a 4.5" display.

 

assuming there is nothing BUT screen. My old 3Gs is a few millimeters shy of  fitting INTO the screen of my Galaxy S3.

 

This would mean getting rid of the home button, ear-speaker, and front facing camera, something I don't see Apple doing any time soon.

post #35 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post


What?
There's is nothing the least bit 'in violation of forum rules' presented anywhere in my post(s), and your not agreeing with it doesn't make it so, and only serves to further demonstrate your rampant disregard for all that actually makes for a suitable/fair forum moderator.
As I previously stated, "Nice to (finally) see an iPhone update, but that's really ALL it is".

 

You don't need to violate the rules to be a trollish bore... and be banned.

post #36 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckVader View Post

 

assuming there is nothing BUT screen. My old 3Gs is a few millimeters shy of  fitting INTO the screen of my Galaxy S3.

 

This would mean getting rid of the home button, ear-speaker, and front facing camera, something I don't see Apple doing any time soon.

 

Wrong. 4.5" assumes edge-to-edge screen horizontally (in portrait orientation) and rounded section to rounded section vertically in the existing iPhone-4(S).

I banned myself from commenting on the Home button on this forum, but there is plenty of space for speakers and cameras. (Just look at the back panel of the iPhone-5 photos to get the idea)

post #37 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by davida View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by audioinside View Post

"The new iPhone is projected to mark one of the few secular growth stories"

Please check your dictionary before flaming the editors.

Well, I did, and while the term "secular" might be applied to an event defining a century or an age, it still doesn't seem applicable,

for an event described as *maybe* defining the second half of the current year...

post #38 of 116
Excuse me, how the hell did he conclude that the iPhone 5 could hurt pc sales? Talk about hype!
Another market manipulator.
post #39 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckVader View Post

I've heard the argument that many competing phones are simply too big or too bulky to be comfortable. I completely agree, if you don't often carry a purse, or pants with large pockets, carting around a 5"+ phone is just inconvenient. However, the phone is that large due to screen size, not LTE capability. A larger battery certainly helps when using LTE as opposed to other communication standards, but saying the phone is big because of LTE completely misses the point.

 

But, that's why these Android phones are big. They need a large battery to get through the day with LTE, that requires a larger case, and the screen is big to distract from the fact that they had to put a giant battery in a giant case to make the battery last longer than 3 hours.

 

Again, this is the only reason Android phones all started getting supersized when they started adding LTE to them.

post #40 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post

I simply don't follow why iPhone 5 would impact PC sales. Different market, different set of buyers, different functionality. From recent reports, some super iPad could certainly alter PC buying habits, but not an iPhone 5.

Smartphones in general are already affecting PC sales.. It's about consumers and IT departments purchasing new smartphones ( and tablets ) and postponing upgrades of their " good enough" PCs. Many consumers and companies can "make do" with their current XP or Windows 7 computers, so they use their budgets to buy smartphones.

Many smartphones are being used to do work that traditionally needed a PC. Consumers and companies can still use their current PCs to do the limited tasks the require Windows and Office.

The smartphones are evolving at an incredible rate, adding new features and whole new ways to accomplish tasks. They are the cliche, "computer in your pocket."

Who needs a new 3GHZ PC to run Word, Outlook, PowerPoint, and Excel? Consumers and IT departments are putting their money towards smartphones and tablets, increasing their efficiency for many ( though not all ) tasks. They are not ditching their PCs, they just don't feel the need to upgrade them ( they're "good enough" ) as often as smartphones.

Anecdotal:

I've dealt with two companies that used Windows NT 4 up until the end of 2011, bc it was good enough for their closed networks. They only upgraded bc sourcing replacement RAM and hard drives was becoming a PIA.

I have two friends who work for major Pharmaceutical companies that finally switched to Windows 7 in 2012. They won't upgrade again for at least 4 years, Windows 9 or 10. Instead, they upgrade smartphones every 2 years and have given all of their field reps iPads with custom apps.

Another friend owns his own company with 25 employees running customized $100,000 trading software. Everyone has a workstation with 2-3 monitors. Instead of buying everyone laptops or upgrading "good enough" workstations, he bought everyone iPad 2s and paid $7,000 for proprietary iOS software that integrates with their bigger system.

It's all about creating more efficiency, many times upgrading PCs won't create any new efficient ways to get work done. Therefore smartphons and tablet purchases are postponing current or future PC upgrades.
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