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Apple's Phil Schiller explains lack of NFC and inductive charging in iPhone 5 - Page 2

post #41 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

I wonder why Greenpeace has not said anything about companies using this wasteful technology.

 

Greenpeace only gets involved when they think can milk a situation for maximum publicity.

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post #42 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post

Inductive charging would be pretty nice, especially since everything else is already wireless anyway, it would add to the coolness factor which is pretty relevant when it comes to Apple hardware. Cables could still be used, all Apple would have to do would be to leave two metal contacts somewhere on the outer shell of the phone that a case / bumper / whatever could connect to and the problem with USB charging would go away. They could even use more of these contacts to implement a decent dock with all kinds of AV output without requiring an actual port.

Why? Is it any easier to align a device onto a stand than to plug it into a dock? What's the difference (other than the fact that alignment is guaranteed with a dock)?
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post #43 of 100
First comment was how thin the phone is, who cares, it's not a benefit. Make it 1/16 thicker and leave the connector alone, and add battery life, now there's a benefit, not some feature that is of no use.
post #44 of 100
Originally Posted by mrmantle View Post
…not some feature that is of no use.

 

So the connector you've never used has "no use", despite it being a long time coming and probably crucial to the future of devices.

post #45 of 100

Both inductive charing and NFC are non-critical features and don't really bring solutions to the table. Maybe if NFC is more secure than a standard CC, then it could be useful, but I'm sure it'll bring it's own negatives to the table as well. 

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post #46 of 100

little off topic, but I'm trying to spread the word ...

 

Merchants eat fraud.  CC authorization is not a guarantee, just a requirement.

 

Stolen CC numbers are used fraudulently for card-not-present transactions.  It's not the card or device that is the problem.

 

Current model has the merchant as agent, takes your number and such, sends it to processor.  Then, for recurring transactions, card on file, or refund to same card, merchant has to store (encrypted) card info.

 

Proper model would be a three party transaction:  card holder swipes and card info is encrypted and sent to processor.  If approved, processor gives a transaction ticket number to merchant.  That ticket is good only for use by that merchant, and only for refunds or if cardholder approved recurring charges at time of authentication / authorization.  Merchant can store all that's needed but if it's stolen it's useless.

 

This is emerging as "tokenization."  But the card issuers and processors are dragging their feet on it.  You'd think they'd be all for it, but remember they have shifted all the losses to merchants and add more of their fees.  So they make money on fraud.  Their risk is non-payment of the account.

 

Presently, security depends on every Ma & Pa retailer to implement 200 pages of extremely technical network, firewall, auditing, and secure IT transaction details which are so complex most experts can't get it all right.  It's as if Eisenhower had secured the D-Day plans by telling all the soldiers and disseminating security standards for each of them to follow.

 

Insane, and it starts with Congress letting the credit card issuers off the hook.  They have de-facto police powers to "fine" merchants and now a part of their revenue is the fines and all the licensing fees paid by authorized security auditors and network scanning companies -- 10's of thousands per year from each.

 

Pure Orwell.  I hope Apple is pondering a complete rethink of the payment model.

post #47 of 100
So Apple should have used inductive charging because is "it's cool"? I'm glad Apple is more concerned with practical benefits than coolness factor.
post #48 of 100

I used to think NFC was a "must have", especially after using it in Japan, but I'm less enamoured of it's implementation elsewhere. As there are already barcode scanners in virtually every retail establishment I think Passbook will serve us fine for the next year or two, and Apple will build on it's usefulness in the meantime. 

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post #49 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylerk36 View Post

Honestly the iPhone 5 is the last iPhone Apple will ever release.  December 21st is the end of all things as we know it in this planet.  So buy one and enjoy it without NFC because it wont matter.  LOL.
So I should probably just put it on my credit card, and leave my cash available for sex and/or drugs?

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post #50 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

"I WISH YELLOWSTONE WOULD HAVE ERUPTED MORE VIOLENTLY."

"IS THAT IT? ONLY FOUR BILLION DEAD?"

"PSHH, THE POLES SHIFTED MORE THAN THAT LAST YEAR."
Okay that's three, we still need seven more! It was a good start but we need you to go the distance!

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post #51 of 100
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Originally Posted by d4rkriver View Post


I don't understand. What does NFC do that is so cool? How will it redefine purchasing?

Do I still have to go to a designated payment point (cashier) to purchase items? Yep. Do I still have to get something out of my pocket to pay for said items? Yep. Is there still some sort of authentication process to determine the payment is coming from a legitimate purchaser? Yep.

Oh look, it changes everything while changing nothing. So I won't have to carry a slim piece of plastic in my pocket anymore, I still have to carry an ID among various other things necessitating a wallet.

And if FirstData or another entity is verifying purchases aren't fraudulent with a plastic card, I'm sure there'll be the same or other entities verifying NFC purchases. And the purchaser will still pay for that verification in the same way.

Like I said, it changes everything without solving any problems!

Please tell me I'm wrong. What am I missing? What is so amazing about NFC or non-contact purchasing?

In my opinion, the Apple Store has already solved this in its own way. Just buy items through a localized website, walk out with items in hand and receipt on screen. Your card number and data can be pre-programed in. Done.
Stop making sense! We'll have none of that tom-foolery here! There is a significant faction out there that clamor for the "latest and greatest" without stopping to think about the actual implementation. Seriously, some people here would head to the local supermarket with just the slightest mention of digital toilet paper!

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post #52 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylerk36 View Post

Honestly the iPhone 5 is the last iPhone Apple will ever release.  December 21st is the end of all things as we know it in this planet.  So buy one and enjoy it without NFC because it wont matter.  LOL.

 

That's actually false. If you do the math right that's incorrect. Every year we skip seconds on the clock and the earth now rotates 6 seconds faster than it used to because of an earthquake in china. So we would actually be in the year 2013 already if you added the seconds by Dec 21.

post #53 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splinemodel View Post

Assuming you live in San Francisco (sflocal?), NFC is in every parking meter.  It's also in most shops, you just haven't noticed because it is integrated into the payment terminals.  Point of sale companies have been successful recently with NFC terminals, because vendors WANT IT.  They currently are forced to eat 3% in credit card transaction fees.  That's a lot of money.  Using Paypal (or whoever) as an intermediary still requires a transaction fee.  Vendors are simply not going to go out of their way to support forms of payment that require transaction fees when NFC, which does not, is available and moving along nicely.
That's great...until I leave the city limits. Hope they have NFC terminals out in the rest of the world. Until then, I still have to carry cash, checks, or credit cards. Actually I get it - I can see in the future this will be convenient, but right now it affords me nothing extra. I want it, just not yet.

After rereading your post, I notice that you state NFC transactions do not require a transaction fee. Is this true? I assumed any credit or debit card purchase involved a fee from whoever processes the transaction. That has always been my experience - with the seller covering the fee in most cases - but I wouldn't be able to state this with absolute certainty.
Edited by diplication - 9/12/12 at 10:37pm

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post #54 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

 

Inductive charging is extremely wasteful.  No company legitimately concerned about the environment would embrace it as a core product feature.

 

PLUS, you run a real danger of ruining all your floppy discs.    /s

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post #55 of 100
People who are saying they didn't want NFC clearly don't have a clue what possibilities NFC brings. It could allow you to completely get rid of your wallet and pay for everything with your phone. Had Apple implemented it, retailers would have been on board, and all this would have happened within a year. This puts electronic payment back a number of years and puts all the power in Google's hands.

Not including NFC and pushing this technology was a big mistake on Apple's part. Their passbook idea is far too niche and will not take off.
post #56 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by diplication View Post


That's great...until I leave the city limits. Hope they have NFC terminals out in the rest of the world.

I can't commit to parking meters, but there are only a few payment terminal manufacturers in the world.  All of them are selling NFC-equipped terminals like gangbusters.

 

Anyway, I don't know why you have a problem with NFC, but I'm sure it's because you don't understand why traditional credit cards need to go.  Read the post from VicAustin a few above.  NFC transactions are exactly the same as smartcard transactions, which have been proven over the last 15 years.  They can be managed in many ways.  In situations where the transaction is directly between the bank and the vendor, there is not customarily a transaction fee.

 

Originally Posted by Hutcho View Post

Not including NFC and pushing this technology was a big mistake on Apple's part. Their passbook idea is far too niche and will not take off.

 

Passbook is a failure waiting to happen.  I suspect the main reason why there's no NFC is because Apple didn't finish their product in time.

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post #57 of 100
Why didn't they just use mini-usb?
post #58 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjw View Post

Why didn't they just use mini-usb?

1. Because Mini (Micro) USB doesn't support USB 3.0

2. Because they can multiplex some of the popular dock pins onto the 9-pin connector.  Most dongles use a 2-pin serial connection, for example.

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post #59 of 100
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Originally Posted by sflocal View Post


Who the heck cares about NFC besides tech-heads and fandroids?  In all my travels, I have yet to come across anything that would use it?  I see no merchants, stores, vending machines, etc. that has it.


Oh wait, it's only a huge deal to those that simply want it for the sake of having it and having "bragging rights".  Jeez.. when there's stuff out there that uses it, then Apple will look into it.

Actually NFC is very useful, it's the US that's ass-backwards about it. The US, because of it's investment in mag-stripe equipment, won't adopt chip+pin or NFC (PayPass) because the old equipment works just fine. It'll be 15 years before all that equipment is turned over.

Meanwhile you can use PayPass pretty much everywhere in Canada. The "killer-app" for NFC on an iPhone or iPad is receiving payments, not making them. This currently can be done by various dongle-type devices and apps in a similar manner that the "Square" works for mag stripes. It's just a lot more expensive to make a chip+pin dongle than it is a NFC one.

If NFC were built into the iPhone and iPad device, you could exchange money wirelessly with anyone, not just shops. You could even cut Visa and Mastercard out of the equation. Unfortunately the incumbant telcos,banks, Visa and Mastercard are too invested in the status quo of fees to allow this to happen. Just look at Paypal or XEtrade, at how difficult it is just to setup, let alone deal with people who may defraud the system.

Try going to a convention in the US and compare it with Canada.
In the US, everyone has Square, and some larger companies have their own credit card machines.
In Canada, nobody can use Square, so you are stuck using cash. Maybe paypal if you're lucky. Yet everyone has PayPass/PayWave credit cards, there's nothing out there like Square to use it on an iPhone or iPad. So Passbook might be a way to cut everyone out of the picture. Use the iOS devices existing camera and a barcode to initiate a transfer.
post #60 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutcho View Post

People who are saying they didn't want NFC clearly don't have a clue what possibilities NFC brings. It could allow you to completely get rid of your wallet and pay for everything with your phone. Had Apple implemented it, retailers would have been on board, and all this would have happened within a year. This puts electronic payment back a number of years and puts all the power in Google's hands.
Not including NFC and pushing this technology was a big mistake on Apple's part. Their passbook idea is far too niche and will not take off.

 

I'm sure Apple is aware of the possibilities of NFC. I'm also sure they have weighed the matter a lot (and have more capable resources to weigh the matter) and have decided not to include it. As some people here say - Apple will include it when it is a practical and useful solution. Or, to put it another way - when the possibilities are closer to realisation, then Apple will put it in.

post #61 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post

Inductive charging would be pretty nice, especially since everything else is already wireless anyway, it would add to the coolness factor which is pretty relevant when it comes to Apple hardware. Cables could still be used, all Apple would have to do would be to leave two metal contacts somewhere on the outer shell of the phone that a case / bumper / whatever could connect to and the problem with USB charging would go away. They could even use more of these contacts to implement a decent dock with all kinds of AV output without requiring an actual port.

Why? Is it any easier to align a device onto a stand than to plug it into a dock? What's the difference (other than the fact that alignment is guaranteed with a dock)?

Yes. Have you used the iPad dock yet? Aligning it with the connector is a PAIN (not to mention that it doesn't work with the Smart Case on and connecting through the Smart Case is another PITA). An inductive charger and accessories with their own USB ports would address both of these issues.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmantle View Post

First comment was how thin the phone is, who cares, it's not a benefit. Make it 1/16 thicker and leave the connector alone, and add battery life, now there's a benefit, not some feature that is of no use.

Indeed. Previous iPhone designs never compromised anything; this one compromised a lot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmantle View Post

…not some feature that is of no use.

So the connector you've never used has "no use", despite it being a long time coming and probably crucial to the future of devices.

It only lost Firewire, component video, composite video, two analog audio channels, HDMI, and RS-232 without actually adding any new features... Pretty useful connector right there! -- Sarcasm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

So Apple should have used inductive charging because is "it's cool"? I'm glad Apple is more concerned with practical benefits than coolness factor.

Inductive charging has practical benefits. if everyone started using it, public places such as coffee shops, restaurants, and even public transportation would have really good reasons to deploy inductive charging stations, meaning battery life would become less of an issue. You could even have a general-purpose inductive charging station in your car!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Misa View Post

Actually NFC is very useful, it's the US that's ass-backwards about it. The US, because of it's investment in mag-stripe equipment, won't adopt chip+pin or NFC (PayPass) because the old equipment works just fine. It'll be 15 years before all that equipment is turned over.

I agree with Apple on this decision. QR codes are a much more elegant solution as they don't require new hardware. A laptop with a webcam and an Internet connection can serve as a POS, with the only thing needed being a standard protocol that all banks can agree with.
post #62 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post


Who the heck cares about NFC besides tech-heads and fandroids?  In all my travels, I have yet to come across anything that would use it?  I see no merchants, stores, vending machines, etc. that has it.

Oh wait, it's only a huge deal to those that simply want it for the sake of having it and having "bragging rights".  Jeez.. when there's stuff out there that uses it, then Apple will look into it.

 

Well, that's the whole chicken and the egg problem. If there aren't any devices out there supporting NFC why would vendors bother to incur the costs of upgrading to use NFC payment methods? If Apple would have added it, it could have have really pushed adoption forward since vendors could easily expect millions of NFC ready devices to be in use in a very short order.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Of course there's an advantage - buzzword compliance. For most of the geeks asking for this, they won't be happy until they can carry around a mobile phone that has a 10" screen and 8,000 other features no one else will use.
As for the rest, I don't see the convenience factor as being significant. It takes perhaps half a second to plug my iPhone in - and even less if I use an iPhone charging dock. It takes me many times that amountin order to get my Wii controllers aligned with the inductive charging station.

 

My Palm Pre 2 had inductive charging and it was a really cool feature. Just take a second to put the the phone on the Touchstone charger and you were done. And if you're like me and you use your phone at work as a music player, you needn't worry about ripping cords out of the wall if you forgot about the phone when you moved. It would just come off the charger and you could recover from there. And it seemed just as fast if not faster than corded charging.

post #63 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jigjag69 View Post

Ignorant much? Ever been to McDonald's genius?

I've never seen a McDonald's with NFC. Are you thinking of RFID pads? If so, those aren't NFC and one would be very ignorant indeed to confuse the two.

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post #64 of 100
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Originally Posted by mrmantle View Post

First comment was how thin the phone is, who cares, it's not a benefit. Make it 1/16 thicker and leave the connector alone, and add battery life, now there's a benefit, not some feature that is of no use.

Why is it that people confuse "I want" with "everyone wants"?

For some people, a thinner phone IS a benefit. And many people are quite happy with the 4S battery life - and the 5 is supposed to be even better.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post

Yes. Have you used the iPad dock yet? Aligning it with the connector is a PAIN (not to mention that it doesn't work with the Smart Case on and connecting through the Smart Case is another PITA). An inductive charger and accessories with their own USB ports would address both of these issues..

I really can't help it if you're too clumsy to insert an iPad into the dock. Furthermore, the newer connector should be even easier to use than the old 30 pin connector, so your argument goes away.

As I said - my experience is that aligning my Wii controllers with the inductive charging stand takes a LOT longer than simply plugging in my iPhone. And that's before you even consider the massive amounts of energy wasted by inductive charging.
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post #65 of 100
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Originally Posted by Hutcho View Post

People who are saying they didn't want NFC clearly don't have a clue what possibilities NFC brings. It could allow you to completely get rid of your wallet and pay for everything with your phone. Had Apple implemented it, retailers would have been on board, and all this would have happened within a year. This puts electronic payment back a number of years and puts all the power in Google's hands.
Not including NFC and pushing this technology was a big mistake on Apple's part. Their passbook idea is far too niche and will not take off.


How about something like this?

 

You've finished your meal in a restaurant. The serving bod comes over with one of those dinky 7-inch iPads. He enters the amount and takes a picture of the QR code on your phone. You leave the restaurant.

 

Not sure how to handle tips though ... :-(

post #66 of 100
Wait, someone is actually using NFC? It always sounded like a buzzword, the kind that no one knew what it meant, but they felt they had to have it.
post #67 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jigjag69 View Post

I have used it many times.with nfc. They are compatible

Really? Where are these McDonald's located. What is the name of the system they use? What is the name of the system you use? What does RFID backwards compatibility have to do with anything if you swear it's not the old hat RFID tech but using an NFC enabled device on your end to communicate to an NFC enabled device on the other end?

You'll need to prove that McDonald's in the US are using NFC and that you using NFC on your end. ExpressPay, PayPass and payWave are not NFC.

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post #68 of 100
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Really? Where are these McDonald's located. What is the name of the system they use? What is the name of the system you use? What does RFID backwards compatibility have to do with anything if you swear it's not the old hat RFID tech but using an NFC enabled device on your end to communicate to an NFC enabled device on the other end?
You'll need to prove that McDonald's in the US are using NFC and that you using NFC on your end. ExpressPay, PayPass and payWave are not NFC.

 

Have you tried Googling 'McDonalds using NFC'?

post #69 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayz View Post

Have you tried Googling 'McDonalds using NFC'?

Those results show stories covering small scale tests in various countries, not wide roll-outs.
post #70 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


Those results show stories covering small scale tests in various countries, not wide roll-outs.


True enough.

post #71 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post

Yes. Have you used the iPad dock yet? Aligning it with the connector is a PAIN (not to mention that it doesn't work with the Smart Case on and connecting through the Smart Case is another PITA). An inductive charger and accessories with their own USB ports would address both of these issues..

I really can't help it if you're too clumsy to insert an iPad into the dock. Furthermore, the newer connector should be even easier to use than the old 30 pin connector, so your argument goes away.

As I said - my experience is that aligning my Wii controllers with the inductive charging stand takes a LOT longer than simply plugging in my iPhone. And that's before you even consider the massive amounts of energy wasted by inductive charging.

For starters, with that comment I really doubt you've ever used an iPad dock since those docks are way smaller than the iPad; you can't just drop the iPad on them with one hand, especially without looking since it has to be perfectly centered, and you need to hold the iPad from the bottom because inserting it there requires a specific tilt (letting it rest on the stand doesn't work, at least on the third-generation iPad, which is slightly thicker). Secondly, even if I was clumsy, your remark would actually be validating my point, because my supposed clumsiness wouldn't be an issue with inductive charging, so you're kinda defeating yourself by pointing out a usability issue. Third, I have to wonder how an even smaller and narrower connector would be easier to use in this situation. An inductive charger, however, would have none of these usability issues, and being clumsy with one would, again, not be a problem.

Lastly, inductive charging alignment problems can be addressed using magnets on flat surfaces, and the power conscious like you could take advantage of the external conductors which would be perfectly aligned with the devices' docks, bumpers, or cases that I suggested earlier. Apple themselves have patented inductive charging technology, hinting at plans to implement it in the future, so you should take their current official stance on the matter as bullshit.

Where's the spirit of innovation?
post #72 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post

Lastly, inductive charging alignment problems can be addressed using magnets on flat surfaces, and the power conscious like you could take advantage of the external conductors which would be perfectly aligned with the devices' docks, bumpers, or cases that I suggested earlier. Apple themselves have patented inductive charging technology, hinting at plans to implement it in the future, so you should take their current official stance on the matter as bullshit.
Where's the spirit of innovation?

I'd prefer innovation where it matters.

If you use metal contacts, it's really not significantly different than plugging in a cable - other than requiring extra bulk (magnets, etc) that add no value. If you use true inductive charging, then you create waste - and the same increase in bulk.

Pluggin in a cable require such an insignificant amount of time that I'd rather not have them adding bulk to the phone to satisfy the people complaining about the 0.2 seconds it takes to plug your phone in at night.
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post #73 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

I'd prefer innovation where it matters.

And where is that? Is a touch-screen innovation where it really matters? Is the ability to run apps on your phone innovation where it really matters? Who defines what matters? And why would the ability to easily charge a phone in public places not matter?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

If you use metal contacts, it's really not significantly different than plugging in a cable - other than requiring extra bulk (magnets, etc) that add no value. If you use true inductive charging, then you create waste - and the same increase in bulk.

Technically, metal conductors would achieve the same as a connector (which is the point, no drawbacks), however from a usability perspective (which is where Apple is supposed to be strong) they would be a huge improvement since they'd be able to get rid of the connector port altogether and stuff would be much easier to plug. My suggestion was to use both, though: inductive charging where metal connectors would be inappropriate (charging in public places) and metal conductors where inductive charging would be inappropriate (charging from USB or docks plugged to wall sockets).

Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Pluggin in a cable require such an insignificant amount of time that I'd rather not have them adding bulk to the phone to satisfy the people complaining about the 0.2 seconds it takes to plug your phone in at night.

Actually my main complaint is about them having removed the 30-pin connector, which had a lot of functionality that is currently not being replicated by the 9-pin connector. The new connector was a huge compromise with very little in terms of advantage. Ironically, one of its "advantages" is being easier to connect, something you don't seem to care about. While the 30-pin connector made sense to exist for all the functionality that it provided, this one does not since pretty much everything can be done through Wi-Fi these days and there are more elegant solutions for power. That's the kind of innovation that I would accept as well as the kind of thing the average person would be drooling over.
post #74 of 100

Apple just missed the chance to define the NFC standard.  Apple is playing hard to not let its followers to have the NFC and inductive charging because people will say Apple is becoming a follower instead of an innovator which is sadly becoming true after SJ...

post #75 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splinemodel View Post

I can't commit to parking meters, but there are only a few payment terminal manufacturers in the world.  All of them are selling NFC-equipped terminals like gangbusters.

 

Anyway, I don't know why you have a problem with NFC, but I'm sure it's because you don't understand why traditional credit cards need to go.  Read the post from VicAustin a few above.  NFC transactions are exactly the same as smartcard transactions, which have been proven over the last 15 years.  They can be managed in many ways.  In situations where the transaction is directly between the bank and the vendor, there is not customarily a transaction fee.

 

Originally Posted by Hutcho View Post

Not including NFC and pushing this technology was a big mistake on Apple's part. Their passbook idea is far too niche and will not take off.

 

Passbook is a failure waiting to happen.  I suspect the main reason why there's no NFC is because Apple didn't finish their product in time.

Don't get me wrong, I like NFC.  But with the current installed infrastructure, i don't know if now is the right time for Apple to jump into the game.  Any failure due to infrastructure problems would be seen as an Apple failure.  Why risk your reputation now, when later you can make a real difference.  I think it's very much about the timing.

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post #76 of 100
Vaelian View Post
It only lost Firewire, component video, composite video, two analog audio channels, HDMI, and RS-232 without actually adding any new features

 

I must have missed the dedicated HDMI pins in the old dock's schematic. As for Firewire, 2nd gen iPods are already limited on accessory compatibility. Analog video? Stick with devices made in the same decade. Was the old dock useless for not having dedicated horizontal and vertical sync pins? How am I supposed to use it with this Soviet-era projector??

 

The 30 pin dock connector had several multi-function pins, configuring themselves internally based on accessory voltage/ohm output. I will safely assume this brand new connector can do the same, if not more. That obviously means HDMI, being digital and all. Don't discount the possibility of audio line out until you see a spec sheet.

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post #77 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vorsos View Post

 

I must have missed the dedicated HDMI pins in the old dock's schematic. As for Firewire, 2nd gen iPods are already limited on accessory compatibility. Analog video? Stick with devices made in the same decade. Was the old dock useless for not having dedicated horizontal and vertical sync pins? How am I supposed to use it with this Soviet-era projector??

 

The 30 pin dock connector had several multi-function pins, configuring themselves internally based on accessory voltage/ohm output. I will safely assume this brand new connector can do the same, if not more. That obviously means HDMI, being digital and all. Don't discount the possibility of audio line out until you see a spec sheet.

Apple has confirmed that the new connector will not support video out. You have two options: Airplay or Apple TV.

http://www.imore.com/lightning-connector-drops-video-out-support-wants-you-use-airplay-and-apple-tv

 

...and in case you're hopeful the Lightning-to-30-pin-adapter/cable might solve that if it's a problem for you, Apple says video-out won't be supported there either.

melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #78 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

 

I wonder why Greenpeace has not said anything about companies using this wasteful technology.

 

If everything we charged was switched to it, we'd have to dig up a lot more coal.

Or we could just invest more in renewable energy sources like solar and wind. I mean if we ever run out of solar energy we're all pretty screwed.

post #79 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by urungus View Post


The main significance of the new port is that you an no longer connect your iPhone to a TV set, and there is no longer line-level audio for high-quality connection to a stereo.

 

Seriously?  Why the hell would they do that, especially when music is in their DNA?

post #80 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by diplication View Post

After rereading your post, I notice that you state NFC transactions do not require a transaction fee. Is this true? I assumed any credit or debit card purchase involved a fee from whoever processes the transaction. That has always been my experience - with the seller covering the fee in most cases - but I wouldn't be able to state this with absolute certainty.

 

Yes, people do keep saying this, "NFC eliminates the transaction fees," but that simply isn't true. But, before any of you go ballistic shouting that, "It damn well is true!" consider that what you are saying is the equivalent of saying, "WiFi/Bluetooth eliminates transaction fees." NFC does not, by itself, in any way, eliminate transaction fees. Any transaction fees, or lack thereof, depend entirely on the backend system that things are connected to, and, thus, have nothing necessarily to do with NFC. NFC transactions could have fees, or they might not. It would depend entirely on the system setup that you interface with and pay through.

 

Just as a non-NFC based method of payment might or might not have transaction fees. The issue of fees is not in any way connected with NFC as a technology, any more than it is connected to WiFi or Bluetooth.


Edited by anonymouse - 9/13/12 at 12:35pm
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