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T-Mobile to have iPhone 5-ready nano-SIM cards by mid-October

post #1 of 59
Thread Starter 
In a tweet on Thursday, T-Mobile revealed that it will be carrying iPhone 5-compatible nano-SIM cards for use on its network in mid-October, giving subscribers access to Apple's latest handset.

A number of T-Mobile customers took to Twitter recently, asking the telecom if and when it would be releasing nano-SIM cards to be used with Apple iPhone 5 as the carrier is not yet an Apple partner carrier. The company issued multiple responses, as reported by The Verge, promising subscribers access to the appropriate cards needed to operate the new device on its network.

September 14, 2012


Current subscribers will need to purchase an unlocked iPhone 5 to use the smartphone on T-Mobile's network, however it is unclear when Apple will be selling those versions in the U.S. It was discovered on Thursday that pricing of the unlocked units would be similar to previous iPhone iterations, with the 16GB, 32GB and 64GB models running $649, $749 and $849, respectively.

When the nano-SIM cards do arrive, subscribers will only be able to operate the iPhone 5 on T-Mobile's 2G EDGE network, however the company is slowly rolling out 4G HSPA+ service across the country, with current availability in Seattle, Las Vegas and New York City.
post #2 of 59
So I should presume that means that iPhone features that require carrier support, like visual voicemail, would still not be available?
post #3 of 59
If Visual Voicemail unavailable, does that mean the phone just rings and rings until the caller gets tired and hangs up? And calls again later or you can check caller id. Does caller id work on a non official carriers network?

Can one circumvent Visual Voicemail with YouMail or Libon VoiceFeed (which I like the looks of but don't have)?

http://www.libon.com/en/iphone/on-voicefeed

What else is there that won't work on non official carriers networks? Besides LTE or 3G speeds?

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post #4 of 59
so ... if one is in Seattle then we'd be able to take advantage immediately of 4G HSPA or would we still only be on EDGE 2G?
post #5 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

If Visual Voicemail unavailable, does that mean the phone just rings and rings until the caller gets tired and hangs up? 

No.

It means you have to dial your voicemail to listen to your messages rather than than looking at (visual) which voicemails you have.

post #6 of 59
Originally Posted by Gordon Werner View Post
so ... if one is in Seattle then we'd be able to take advantage immediately of 4G HSPA or would we still only be on EDGE 2G?

 

Depends on whether the appropriate towers are built there.

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post #7 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon Werner View Post

so ... if one is in Seattle then we'd be able to take advantage immediately of 4G HSPA or would we still only be on EDGE 2G?

 

I'm picking up T-Mobile's HSPA+ with my iPhone 3GS here in Santa Clara, CA. Apparently T-Mobile flipped the switch on my tower the afternoon of Sept 12.

 

http://www.airportal.de/

post #8 of 59

Lol T-Mobile wants the Iphone yet trashes it in commercials, and they wonder why they are the last to get it, lol Cricket is getting it over them... sad

post #9 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by xRCx View Post

Lol T-Mobile wants the Iphone yet trashes it in commercials, and they wonder why they are the last to get it, lol Cricket is getting it over them... sad

 

has nothing to do with PR and everything to do with not having the correct technology 

post #10 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by OriginalMacRat View Post

 

I'm picking up T-Mobile's HSPA+ with my iPhone 3GS here in Santa Clara, CA. Apparently T-Mobile flipped the switch on my tower the afternoon of Sept 12.

 

http://www.airportal.de/

 

and ... are you able to do all the things you expected to? is it nice and fast?

 

Thanx

post #11 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon Werner View Post

has nothing to do with PR and everything to do with not having the correct technology 

+1

They assumed Apple would build a phone for them sooner or later.

How stunning is it that a cell phone company has to redo their entire network for one cell phone.

That's impact.
post #12 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by SWS View Post


+1
They assumed Apple would build a phone for them sooner or later.
How stunning is it that a cell phone company has to redo their entire network for one cell phone.
That's impact.

It's not stunning that they have to redo their entire network for a phone.

It's stunning that they ARE redoing their entire network for one phone.

post #13 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon Werner View Post

 

and ... are you able to do all the things you expected to? is it nice and fast?

 

Thanx

 

Well, I was doing things just fine over the regular 200Kbs EDGE connection. :-)

 

But yeah, for the past 2 days since they flipped the switch on the 1900MHz radio, Speed Test has reported 5Mbs which should come in handy if I need the bandwidth.

post #14 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

It's not stunning that they have to redo their entire network for a phone.
It's stunning that they ARE redoing their entire network for one phone.

Yes. That was my point. You hit the wording on the head.
post #15 of 59

So to use an iPhone on a no contract carrier you have to shell out $850 for the 64GB (because, really, 64 should be the base model, not the high end, but whatevs). What a freakin' gip. No iPhone for me yet again. 

post #16 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

If Visual Voicemail unavailable, does that mean the phone just rings and rings until the caller gets tired and hangs up? And calls again later or you can check caller id. Does caller id work on a non official carriers network?
Can one circumvent Visual Voicemail with YouMail or Libon VoiceFeed (which I like the looks of but don't have)?
http://www.libon.com/en/iphone/on-voicefeed
What else is there that won't work on non official carriers networks? Besides LTE or 3G speeds?

 

 

 

I have had two iPhones on T-Mobile for two years. Caller ID works, regular voice mail works, everything but Visual Voice mail works. What does that mean? It simply means you have to listen to voice mail in the order it arrives. You can't pick and choose what voice mail message to listen to first. 

post #17 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

I have had two iPhones on T-Mobile for two years. Caller ID works, regular voice mail works, everything but Visual Voice mail works. What does that mean? It simply means you have to listen to voice mail in the order it arrives. You can't pick and choose what voice mail message to listen to first. 

 

A nice work around is to use Google Voice and have voice messages recorded on the GV server instead of at T-Mobile.

post #18 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

It's not stunning that they have to redo their entire network for a phone.

It's stunning that they ARE redoing their entire network for one phone.

 

 

Although it desperately wants the iPhone, T-Mobile is not redoing its entire network for one phone. People forget T-Mobile set aside long term plans to update its network because it made no sense to make such plans if it was going to be acquired by AT&T. The whole reason AT&T had to pay T-Mobile 3 billion when the deal didn't go through is because T-Mobile knew if the deal failed it would be financially injured by putting off such planning. 

 

Moreover, T-Mobile's HSPA network is very fast. Faster than AT&T and Verizon's 3G networks. LTE, however, is faster and this is where T-Mobile is hurting. That and the previous version of HSPA wasn't supported on the iPhone. I can buy the new iPhone though, and HSPA is supported in T-Mobile's frequency range. So, the new iPhone will be quite fast on T-Mobile's current network. 

 

T-Mobile is the best deal for the iPhone. AT&T and Verizon have data caps. What is the point of super fast LTE when you are going to blow through your data cap watching a single movie. Sprint's network is slow. You might have unlimited data, but the speeds are painful. T-Mobile, however, actually has a fast data network and unlimited plans. 

 

I posted this before but over two years it is cheaper and a better deal to buy an unlocked iPhone and go to T-Mobile especially now with the iPhone supporting T-Mobile's HSPA network. The subsidized cost of a 16 GB iPhone on the big three is roughly $450 over two years of a contract. This comes out to a little over $18 a month over two years. Unlimited voice, texting, and data costs $59 a month (under T-Mobile's bring your own phone value plans). So for less than $80 a month (excluding taxes and fees) you have what costs around $130 on AT&T. Further, T-Mobile, unlike Sprint and Verizon, supports simultaneous voice and data. 

post #19 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by OriginalMacRat View Post

 

A nice work around is to use Google Voice and have voice messages recorded on the GV server instead of at T-Mobile.

 

 

I have tried that and yes it does work. It really doesn't bother me that much though because all phones lacked visual voice before the iPhone. Since I have never had an officially supported iPhone, I never have had visual voice. You can't miss what you have never had.

post #20 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tyler82 View Post

So to use an iPhone on a no contract carrier you have to shell out $850 for the 64GB (because, really, 64 should be the base model, not the high end, but whatevs). What a freakin' gip. No iPhone for me yet again. 

There is no need for 64 GB iPhone now. What with 4G LTE and iCloud support that much physical Storage is a waste of money.

The iPhone is made for consuming content not storing your entire content library.

Don't get me wrong to each their own. I just find it a complete waste of money.
post #21 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tyler82 View Post

So to use an iPhone on a no contract carrier you have to shell out $850 for the 64GB (because, really, 64 should be the base model, not the high end, but whatevs). What a freakin' gip. No iPhone for me yet again. 

 

 

The subsidized portion of the cost  is the same no matter what model you pick. So if you want a 64 GB model and you went with a subsidized carrier, you'd pay $399 up front and about $450 would be subsidized. So, that still comes out to about $18 a month for 24 months. So, no matter what model you want over two years you'd save significantly on T-Mobile. What I like about T-Mobile is you'd don't even need a data plan if you are generally by wi-fi. You can customize how much data you want all the way down to nothing. 

post #22 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by SWS View Post


There is no need for 64 GB iPhone now. What with 4G LTE and iCloud support that much physical Storage is a waste of money.
The iPhone is made for consuming content not storing your entire content library.
Don't get me wrong to each their own. I just find it a complete waste of money.

 

 

I actually agree. 32 seems best, but I could get by with 16. 

post #23 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

If Visual Voicemail unavailable, does that mean the phone just rings and rings until the caller gets tired and hangs up? And calls again later or you can check caller id. Does caller id work on a non official carriers network?
Can one circumvent Visual Voicemail with YouMail or Libon VoiceFeed (which I like the looks of but don't have)?
http://www.libon.com/en/iphone/on-voicefeed
What else is there that won't work on non official carriers networks? Besides LTE or 3G speeds?
You just have normal voicemail. I actually set mine to forward after som rings to my Google Voice number, and set GV to Do Not Disturb. I get transcribed messages and Visual Voicemail like functionality.
post #24 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tyler82 View Post

So to use an iPhone on a no contract carrier you have to shell out $850 for the 64GB (because, really, 64 should be the base model, not the high end, but whatevs). What a freakin' gip. No iPhone for me yet again. 
That plus a prepaid account is cheaper than your 2 year contract. It's math. Sorry.
post #25 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by OriginalMacRat View Post

I'm picking up T-Mobile's HSPA+ with my iPhone 3GS here in Santa Clara, CA. Apparently T-Mobile flipped the switch on my tower the afternoon of Sept 12.

http://www.airportal.de/
You definitely aren't picking up HSPA+ on a 3GS, as the 4S was the first iPhone to support it.
post #26 of 59
Considering that almost all iPhone buyers are getting them subsidized, and T-Mobile isn't carrying the iPhone itself, is there any big reason for them to rush to get Micro SIMs now?

It's a two-year wait before anyone will be free of their contract and able to switch to them with one.
post #27 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaFox View Post

Considering that almost all iPhone buyers are getting them subsidized, and T-Mobile isn't carrying the iPhone itself, is there any big reason for them to rush to get Micro SIMs now?
It's a two-year wait before anyone will be free of their contract and able to switch to them with one.

Many will pay full price for the iPhone (no contract) and many will pay the early termination fee just to switch to T-Mo.

post #28 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaFox View Post

Considering that almost all iPhone buyers are getting them subsidized, and T-Mobile isn't carrying the iPhone itself, is there any big reason for them to rush to get Micro SIMs now?
It's a two-year wait before anyone will be free of their contract and able to switch to them with one.

 

You can buy iPhones directly from Apple unlocked.

 

2 years ago, T-Mobile USA admitted that they had over 1 million iPhone users on their network.

post #29 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post
 The subsidized cost of a 16 GB iPhone on the big three is roughly $450 over two years of a contract. This comes out to a little over $18 a month over two years.

But a plan with a subsidized phone is the exact same price as bring your own phone (at least on AT&). The only difference with a subsidized phone is you need a two year contract.

It's kinda irrelevant comparing that price (subsidized phone). To use your equation above, if you want AT&T, get a subsidized iPhone instead of buying it outright, and save a little over $18 a month.

 

Just compare plan prices T-Mo vs. big 3.

post #30 of 59
Are you saying the iPhone 5 is compatible with t-mobile right now, on its current network (not the reformed network) at speeds faster than Edge? What would be the max speed on t-mobile HSPA (not +)?
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post


Although it desperately wants the iPhone, T-Mobile is not redoing its entire network for one phone. People forget T-Mobile set aside long term plans to update its network because it made no sense to make such plans if it was going to be acquired by AT&T. The whole reason AT&T had to pay T-Mobile 3 billion when the deal didn't go through is because T-Mobile knew if the deal failed it would be financially injured by putting off such planning. 

Moreover, T-Mobile's HSPA network is very fast. Faster than AT&T and Verizon's 3G networks. LTE, however, is faster and this is where T-Mobile is hurting. That and the previous version of HSPA wasn't supported on the iPhone. I can buy the new iPhone though, and HSPA is supported in T-Mobile's frequency range. So, the new iPhone will be quite fast on T-Mobile's current network. 

T-Mobile is the best deal for the iPhone. AT&T and Verizon have data caps. What is the point of super fast LTE when you are going to blow through your data cap watching a single movie. Sprint's network is slow. You might have unlimited data, but the speeds are painful. T-Mobile, however, actually has a fast data network and unlimited plans. 

I posted this before but over two years it is cheaper and a better deal to buy an unlocked iPhone and go to T-Mobile especially now with the iPhone supporting T-Mobile's HSPA network. The subsidized cost of a 16 GB iPhone on the big three is roughly $450 over two years of a contract. This comes out to a little over $18 a month over two years. Unlimited voice, texting, and data costs $59 a month (under T-Mobile's bring your own phone value plans). So for less than $80 a month (excluding taxes and fees) you have what costs around $130 on AT&T. Further, T-Mobile, unlike Sprint and Verizon, supports simultaneous voice and data. 
post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by xRCx View Post

Lol T-Mobile wants the Iphone yet trashes it in commercials, and they wonder why they are the last to get it, lol Cricket is getting it over them... sad

Pay attention to the T-Mobile commercials with the iPhone. Watch them a few times. Maybe then you'll notice the almost lawyered wording T-Mobile is using to NOT trash the iPhone. They are explicit about it too, they are only trashing the carriers. It makes sense too, because once/if they get it, the marketing is already set up.

post #32 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanus View Post

Are you saying the iPhone 5 is compatible with t-mobile right now, on its current network (not the reformed network) at speeds faster than Edge? What would be the max speed on t-mobile HSPA (not +)?

The iPhone 5 is compatible with T-Mobile EDGE, T-Mobile 3G Refarm (Q4 2012), and T-Mobile LTE (Mid 2013). It will simply fail to connect to regular T-Mobile 3G.

post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanus View Post

Are you saying the iPhone 5 is compatible with t-mobile right now, on its current network (not the reformed network) at speeds faster than Edge? What would be the max speed on t-mobile HSPA (not +)?

 

 

I thought I was saying that, but apparently I misread the specifications. If you believe T-Mobile, what I said should be true probably by the end of the year (for large parts of the Country anyway). It is very confusing, but T-Mobile has been re-farming its network since AT&T's buyout failed. In some areas of the Country, you can already get 3G and faster speeds on the iPhone. I have the 4S, and I still get only the Edge Network. About fifty miles from me I jump over to 3G. 

 

However, Edge on T-Mobile isn't as bad as some might think. The reality is all the current phones T-Mobile offers is on its 3G and 4G networks. So, it is mostly older and iPhones using Edge. I load email, surf the web, and even stream Pandora just fine. I even watched a Netflix TV show over Edge once without stalling (although this result isn't common).

post #34 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

But a plan with a subsidized phone is the exact same price as bring your own phone (at least on AT&). The only difference with a subsidized phone is you need a two year contract.

It's kinda irrelevant comparing that price (subsidized phone). To use your equation above, if you want AT&T, get a subsidized iPhone instead of buying it outright, and save a little over $18 a month.

 

Just compare plan prices T-Mo vs. big 3.

 

 

That might be true on AT&T, but on T-Mobile there is bring your own phone plans (e.g. its value plan) and subsidized phone plans. The bring your own phone plans are cheaper. For example, the bring your own phone value plan for an individual line is $59.99 a month, whereas the subsidized phone price plan is $79.99. Both offer unlimited voice, texting, and data. Again, AT&T only offers a subsidized phone plan and to get what T-Mobile offers for as low as $59.99 costs over $130 on AT&T and AT&T has a 2GB data limit. So my point is if you add the twenty dollars a month to the T-Mobile $59.99 you still come out way cheaper then on AT&T. Further, AT&T forces iPhones into a data plan even if the phone is unlocked and contract free. If you use mostly wi-fi, you can get a data free plan for less. 

post #35 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaFox View Post

Considering that almost all iPhone buyers are getting them subsidized, and T-Mobile isn't carrying the iPhone itself, is there any big reason for them to rush to get Micro SIMs now?
It's a two-year wait before anyone will be free of their contract and able to switch to them with one.

 

 

Sure, people like me will pay full price for the iPhone 5 unlocked to bring to T-Mobile. Moreover, T-Mobile is always doing things to try and keep the iPhone users happy. 

post #36 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tyler82 View Post

So to use an iPhone on a no contract carrier you have to shell out $850 for the 64GB (because, really, 64 should be the base model, not the high end, but whatevs). What a freakin' gip. No iPhone for me yet again. 

So what are your options:

1. You can get a subsidized phone from one of the major carriers and only pay $399 for the phone. However, over the 2 year contract period, you'll pay a lot more if you choose this option. I will save about $500 per year by buying my own iPhone and using Straight Talk instead of AT&T. T-mobile's prices are close to the same.

2. Buy a comparable unsubsidized phone from someone else. The Galaxy SIII, for example, is only about $50 less than the iPhone 5 in base (16 GB) configuration. So you have to decide if saving $50 is worth it to buy a phone which has an inferior ecosystem, much poorer customer service, worse customer satisfaction, and which (if history is any guide) will probably not be upgradeable.

3. Continue to use your Motorola Razr because you're too cheap to buy a new phone.

And, btw, your assertion that 64 GB should be the base is ridiculous. I get by just fine with 32 GB with no sacrifices at all and if money were really tight, even 16 GB would be fine. While your usage may require 64 GB, not everyone does - in fact, most people are fine with much less.
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post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post


That might be true on AT&T, but on T-Mobile there is bring your own phone plans (e.g. its value plan) and subsidized phone plans. The bring your own phone plans are cheaper. For example, the bring your own phone value plan for an individual line is $59.99 a month, whereas the subsidized phone price plan is $79.99. Both offer unlimited voice, texting, and data. Again, AT&T only offers a subsidized phone plan and to get what T-Mobile offers for as low as $59.99 costs over $130 on AT&T and AT&T has a 2GB data limit. So my point is if you add the twenty dollars a month to the T-Mobile $59.99 you still come out way cheaper then on AT&T. Further, AT&T forces iPhones into a data plan even if the phone is unlocked and contract free. If you use mostly wi-fi, you can get a data free plan for less. 

You forgot one thing that makes the difference even greater. With AT&T, when you complete your contract, you continue to pay the full (subsidized) price. With t-mobile, once you've completed your contract period, you can switch to an unsubsidized plan, saving the $20 difference every month.
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post #38 of 59
I'm pretty certain that would require a new 2yr contract to move to the value plan at that point. .
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

You forgot one thing that makes the difference even greater. With AT&T, when you complete your contract, you continue to pay the full (subsidized) price. With t-mobile, once you've completed your contract period, you can switch to an unsubsidized plan, saving the $20 difference every month.
post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


You forgot one thing that makes the difference even greater. With AT&T, when you complete your contract, you continue to pay the full (subsidized) price. With t-mobile, once you've completed your contract period, you can switch to an unsubsidized plan, saving the $20 difference every month.

 

 

 

Exactly. Essentially on T-Moble you can get an everything plan for $59 a month (excluding taxes and fees). If you don't roam, you can even get it cheaper by signing up through Walmart, which has rebranded T-Mobile as Family Mobile.  

 

I have been on every major carrier, and T-Mobile robs you the least. It is insane how AT&T wants to charge you for Face time when you already are subject to data caps. It is your freaking data. 

post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanus View Post

I'm pretty certain that would require a new 2yr contract to move to the value plan at that point. .

 

 

Perhaps because the value plan does involve a two year contract. However, you could then switch to a T-Mobile no-contract plan or a pre paid plan both of which are cheaper than the subsidized plan. 

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