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Apple blueprints offer highly detailed view of iPhone 5

post #1 of 56
Thread Starter 
Blueprints of the iPhone 5 intended for aftermarket product manufacturers have been made available on Apple's developer website, with the documents offering not only precise dimensions but notes on how to properly build a case for the new device.

As discovered by Joel Johnson (via Engadget), the PDF file is supposedly restricted to Apple developers, however it appears the direct link to the schematics can be accessed by the public.

iPhone 5 Blueprint
Source: @joeljohnson via Twitter


It should be noted that AppleInsider cannot verify the legitimacy of the blueprints, however the linked webpage has been authenticated by the Entrust Certificate Authority to be owned by Apple.

While the iPhone 5 has seen massive press coverage since its debut on Wednesday, the handset is not yet available to the public and has thus not been subject to a teardown. The blueprints, despite only showing the phone's external attributes, provide the most comprehensive look at the device so far.

New to the iPhone 5 is the rearrangement of the ambient light sensor and front-facing camera, which are now located directly above the ear speaker, and the proximity sensor that takes its place next to the earpiece. Also added is a third microphone seated between the iPhone 5's rebuilt rear-facing camera and LED flash.

Pre-orders for Apple's newest smartphone went live Friday morning, with Apple selling out of initial launch-day supply in an hour. Two of the company's partner carriers, Verizon and AT&T, followed suit some hours later and all are now quoting shipping estimates of two to three weeks. As of this writing, Sprint still has 32GB and 64GB versions available for delivery on Sept. 21.
post #2 of 56
Being nitpicky here, but this is a part drawing and not a blueprint. The term blueprint is rarely used in mechanical design.
post #3 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post

Being nitpicky here, but this is a part drawing and not a blueprint. The term blueprint is rarely used in mechanical design.

In every modern way this is a blueprint. It's not printed on blue paper via a special process but it doesn't have to be for the term and accepted definitions to be correct. It's been used in the non-literal sense since at least 1926.

blueprint |ˈblo͞oˌprint|
noun
• a design plan or other technical drawing.
• something that acts as a plan, model, or template.

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post #4 of 56
Samsung, start your photocopiers...
"If you put your mind to it, you can accomplish anything" Robert Zemeckis/Bob Gale/Robert_E._Lee
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post #5 of 56

Nothing secret about it. It's right on the public Apple developer website, no need to even login...

https://developer.apple.com/resources/cases/

post #6 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mobius View Post

Samsung, start your photocopiers...

They don't have to. Just drag and drop. :D

post #7 of 56

a bit like Oil Blue Barrel .... (BBL) which no presently living human being has ever seen ...


Edited by umrk_lab - 9/15/12 at 2:15am
post #8 of 56

By the way, did you guys notice that (apart from the screen size), Apple moved to the metric system to indicate, during the keynote, the iPhone weight and thickness ? (this has been noticed by one of my own country website, but this , I guess should have been more noticeable for you).

post #9 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post

Being nitpicky here, but this is a part drawing and not a blueprint. The term blueprint is rarely used in mechanical design.

The term is understood, but has recently been morphed into "Prints". Any contractor or mechanical design personnel could ask someone for "Prints" and will receive either a real 'Blue Print', a CAD drawing, or even a photocopy of a cad drawing. Most involved would consider any of them 'Blue Prints'.

The original meaning will be lost with those who actually used blue paper prints and mechanical drafting. Although called "mechanical drafting" it was actually done by hand.

This is just from what I have read. I have only seen a few real 'Blue Prints'. My father has one for his boat that's framed. It looks messy when compared to a CAD drawing...
post #10 of 56

I guess this is due to the power of habits ... (in my own speciality (aeronautics) all (numerous) project plans refer to specification data as "drawings", as a general term (which makes little sense for software, for example ...).

post #11 of 56
If you change the 5 to 4-s you can get the outer dims for the iPhone4S. I was unable to find the 3GS.

Blueprint is an antiquated term related to how they used to copy original prints. The blue was how the paper changed color when exposed to ammonia. One can google it.
post #12 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by TD912 View Post

Nothing secret about it. It's right on the public Apple developer website, no need to even login...

https://developer.apple.com/resources/cases/

This is cool.  I'd consider saving them all just for the heck of it.

 

 

Blueprint is an antiquated term related to how they used to copy original prints.  The blue was how the paper changed color when exposed to ammonia.  One can google it.
post #13 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by umrk_lab

By the way, did you guys notice that (apart from the screen size), Apple moved to the metric system to indicate, during the keynote, the iPhone weight and thickness ?

 

I guess they did that for consistency reasons. Up until now they never talked about the weight of the iPhone - and to be honest, it never was a light phone to begin with so why talk about it. Now it is. And showing in the keynote that it weighs 3.95 ounces would confuse everyone outside the US. So it had to be grams and the metric system in general. But that's just my reasoning...

post #14 of 56
deleted
Edited by kellya74u - 7/24/13 at 9:00am
post #15 of 56

This is absolutely a blueprint.  The key difference between this drawing and a traditional blueprint is that the old cadmium-ammonia process is no longer used for reproduction of the drawing, resulting in the blue-tinted final product.  This drawing provides dimensions, tolerances, details (highlighted portions of the phone), and general specifications necessary for case design -- all key aspects of a what was considered at one time, a blueprint.

post #16 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vadania View Post


The term is understood, but has recently been morphed into "Prints". Any contractor or mechanical design personnel could ask someone for "Prints" and will receive either a real 'Blue Print', a CAD drawing, or even a photocopy of a cad drawing. Most involved would consider any of them 'Blue Prints'.
The original meaning will be lost with those who actually used blue paper prints and mechanical drafting. Although called "mechanical drafting" it was actually done by hand.
This is just from what I have read. I have only seen a few real 'Blue Prints'. My father has one for his boat that's framed. It looks messy when compared to a CAD drawing...

I started my career (over 30 years ago) as a petroleum engineer, and we made extensive use of blue prints.  Mechanical drawing is so called due to the various mechanical elements used (T-square, angles, mechanical pens vs. freehand drawing which made use of none of these elements) used to produce a precision drawing, and, ostensibly, due to the nature of the drawings themselves, which were typically of mechanical devices.  I also used one of the very first CAD systems -- Intergraph -- which used a $1M+ Digital VAX 780 minicomputer as its CPU.  The VAX was a superb machine, and much larger than many mainframe systems or high-end clusters (such as HP SuperDome, which is a great-great-great-grandchild of the VAX 780).  In any case, it has been only over the past 20 years or so that "true blue" blueprints have given way to modern CAD and plotted (currently, inkjet printed) drawings.

post #17 of 56
Why should this be a secret? Developer membership is inexpensive (it starts at free) and Apple presumably wants cases and accessories to be designed properly. Here's another example: https://developer.apple.com/resources/cases/Case-Design-Guidelines.pdf

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post #18 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vadania View Post


The term is understood, but has recently been morphed into "Prints". Any contractor or mechanical design personnel could ask someone for "Prints" and will receive either a real 'Blue Print', a CAD drawing, or even a photocopy of a cad drawing. Most involved would consider any of them 'Blue Prints'.
The original meaning will be lost with those who actually used blue paper prints and mechanical drafting. Although called "mechanical drafting" it was actually done by hand.
This is just from what I have read. I have only seen a few real 'Blue Prints'. My father has one for his boat that's framed. It looks messy when compared to a CAD drawing...

Is this a engineering website or is it a site dedicated to Apple enthusiasts? Everyone understood what was meant by the headline. But thanks for the answer to a question that nobody asked.

post #19 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by umrk_lab View Post

By the way, did you guys notice that (apart from the screen size), Apple moved to the metric system to indicate, during the keynote, the iPhone weight and thickness ? (this has been noticed by one of my own country website, but this , I guess should have been more noticeable for you).

About time too.  

post #20 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by SixPenceRicher View Post

This is absolutely a blueprint.  The key difference between this drawing and a traditional blueprint is that the old cadmium-ammonia process is no longer used for reproduction of the drawing, resulting in the blue-tinted final product.  This drawing provides dimensions, tolerances, details (highlighted portions of the phone), and general specifications necessary for case design -- all key aspects of a what was considered at one time, a blueprint.

Jesus, seriously people? It doesn't matter, it was a simple headline!

post #21 of 56
Originally Posted by Radjin View Post
About time too.  

 

Imperial for life. *stereotypical modern definition gangster fist on chest and then in the air with a finger symbol*

 

Maybe that should be "Impeer4lyf"… 

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #22 of 56

Three mics... where’s the 3rd?

 

1. One on the bottom as always.

 

2. One new one on the back.

 

3. There used to be one on the top—it’s gone, and now they say there’s one on the front instead. Where’s that one? Just curious for no good reason...

 

I’d hide it in the speaker grille, since that speaker isn’t on for speakerphone use anyway (I wouldn't think). But then, I’d hide the proxy sensor in that same slot too, for the sake of the white model only showing two “holes.” Even if it meant the speaker slot was part mesh and part not, it would still look cleaner than 3 holes. (And is the ambient light sensor really above the speaker now? That camera hole looks too small to do double duty.)

 

Actually, I’d put them ALL in one slightly-longer slot and not even have the camera stand out. Doesn’t matter... I’m getting black!

post #23 of 56
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post
Three mics... where’s the 3rd?

 

1. One on the bottom as always.

 

2. One new one on the back.

 

3. There used to be one on the top—it’s gone, and now they say there’s one on the front instead. Where’s that one? Just curious for no good reason...

 

Top? You're thinking of the iPad, yeah?


Edited by Tallest Skil - 9/15/12 at 8:59am

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #24 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Originally Posted by Radjin View Post
About time too.  

 

Imperial for life. *stereotypical modern definition gangster fist on chest and then in the air with a finger symbol*

 

Maybe that should be "Impeer4lyf"… 

Taking the topic further off course, I prefer metric system for most small measurements up to about a arm's length. In my environment we find that the engineers have almost entirely abandoned the centimeter and never use fractional references to meter or kilometer. In the US one might say 'one and a half miles' where as in other countries instead of one and a half kilometers they would just say two kilometers. Your mileage may varylol.gif. I find liter is a bit small for larger volume measurements and Fahrenheit is much more granular than Celsius making it better suited for weather temperatures. I would rather computer monitors were measured in millimeters rather than rounding up to a the nearest inch.

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post #25 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post

If you change the 5 to 4-s you can get the outer dims for the iPhone4S. I was unable to find the 3GS.

Blueprint is an antiquated term related to how they used to copy original prints. The blue was how the paper changed color when exposed to ammonia. One can google it.

So the iPhone 5 is 8.68mm taller than the 4S (about 11/32")

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post #26 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


In every modern way this is a blueprint. It's not printed on blue paper via a special process but it doesn't have to be for the term and accepted definitions to be correct. It's been used in the non-literal sense since at least 1926.
blueprint |ˈblo͞oˌprint|
noun
• a design plan or other technical drawing.
• something that acts as a plan, model, or template.

That's why this isn't a blueprint though.  A blueprint traditionally is something that will allow you to reconstruct the entire thing in question.  That's why most of the time they are many many pages long for even simple things.  

 

This is instead a plan drawing or a "measured drawing" of the outside of the device only.  It shows nothing but the overall dimensions and placement of exterior features and is intended as a guide for accessory makers.  It isn't a blueprint because it doesn't describe all the pieces of the iPhone, merely what it looks like on the outside. 

post #27 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by jay-t View Post

I guess they did that for consistency reasons.

Could be, but I'm going with marketing reasons. They still list imperial standards on, at least, the US site. I think they went with metric because it sounded better to use.
Quote:
Up until now they never talked about the weight of the iPhone - and to be honest, it never was a light phone to begin with so why talk about it. Now it is. And showing in the keynote that it weighs 3.95 ounces would confuse everyone outside the US. So it had to be grams and the metric system in general. But that's just my reasoning...

It was also getting heavier with nearly every generation. Steve would have never let that happen¡ The one times it did decrease in weight it was only a 1.5% difference which isn't marketable.

iPhone - 135g
iPhone 3G - 133g (1.5% decrease YoY)
iPhone 3GS- 135g (1.5% increase YoY)
iPhone 4- 137g (1.5% increase YoY)
iPhone 4S- 140g (2.2% increase YoY)
iPhone 5- 112g (20.0% decrease YoY)

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #28 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

That's why this isn't a blueprint though.  A blueprint traditionally is something that will allow you to reconstruct the entire thing in question.  That's why most of the time they are many many pages long for even simple things.  

This is instead a plan drawing or a "measured drawing" of the outside of the device only.  It shows nothing but the overall dimensions and placement of exterior features and is intended as a guide for accessory makers.  It isn't a blueprint because it doesn't describe all the pieces of the iPhone, merely what it looks like on the outside. 

It's a bona fide blueprint for building a case or other accessories for this device. This isn't even a relatively new definition for this term.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #29 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

Three mics... where’s the 3rd?

 

1. One on the bottom as always.

 

2. One new one on the back.

 

3. There used to be one on the top—it’s gone, and now they say there’s one on the front instead. Where’s that one? Just curious for no good reason...

 

I’d hide it in the speaker grille, since that speaker isn’t on for speakerphone use anyway (I wouldn't think). But then, I’d hide the proxy sensor in that same slot too, for the sake of the white model only showing two “holes.” Even if it meant the speaker slot was part mesh and part not, it would still look cleaner than 3 holes. (And is the ambient light sensor really above the speaker now? That camera hole looks too small to do double duty.)

 

Actually, I’d put them ALL in one slightly-longer slot and not even have the camera stand out. Doesn’t matter... I’m getting black!

 

Totally agree.  It would be so much neater.  And at some point in the future, I'd like to see a display the turns white when powered off.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Top? You're thinking of the iPad, yeah?

 

No, the iPhone 4/4S had a mic on the top next to the headphone jack

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Taking the topic further off course, I prefer metric system for most small measurements up to about a arm's length. In my environment we find that the engineers have almost entirely abandoned the centimeter and never use fractional references to meter or kilometer. In the US one might say 'one and a half miles' where as in other countries instead of one and a half kilometers they would just say two kilometers. Your mileage may vary. I find liter is a bit small for larger volume measurements and Fahrenheit is much more granular than Celsius making it better suited for weather temperatures. I would rather computer monitors were measured in millimeters rather than rounding up to a the nearest inch.

 

I agree.  Millimeters all very easy to deal with for small sizes.

 

I am quite familiar with these "blueprints" as a close friend has designed a few iPhone 4/4S cases with SolidWorks.  Those blueprints are VERY helpful.  He already made an iPhone 5 mockup from leaked parts and is now onto the iPad mini and 4th gen iPad.

post #30 of 56

Are you guys seriously arguing over the term "blueprint"?   FFS . . . 

 

The picture shows "details about the iPhone 5." You can call it a "cheeseburger" and it won't change what you're seeing. 

post #31 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Are you guys seriously arguing over the term "blueprint"?   FFS . . . 

The picture shows "details about the iPhone 5." You can call it a "cheeseburger" and it won't change what you're seeing. 

Great! Now I want a cheeseburger.... with crumbled blue cheese.


PS: Is blue cheese really blue? :D

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #32 of 56
Chill people. We still cc: in our email, but most people these days don't even know what carbon paper is.
post #33 of 56
I'm not impressed by most aftermarket cases for iPhones. Most are not as well made as the iPhone itself, and look to provide only minimal protection from accidents.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #34 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Great! Now I want a cheeseburger.... with crumbled blue cheese.
PS: Is blue cheese really blue? :D

Is the blue moon really blue?

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post #35 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

That's why this isn't a blueprint though.  A blueprint traditionally is something that will allow you to reconstruct the entire thing in question.  That's why most of the time they are many many pages long for even simple things.  

This is instead a plan drawing or a "measured drawing" of the outside of the device only.  It shows nothing but the overall dimensions and placement of exterior features and is intended as a guide for accessory makers.  It isn't a blueprint because it doesn't describe all the pieces of the iPhone, merely what it looks like on the outside. 

Mixing terms I think. A measured drawing can be a blue print.

There WAS the original drawing(what ever, outline, component, assembly), typically ink on vellum. The 'prints', copies or 'blue prints' were made from the original(usually kept in the vault).

NOW, im would presume Apples is all digital 3d, a data base is the original part. And that is digital revision controlled etc.
Outline drawings, machine data, etc is all copied from that, then prints are inkjet, pdf'd from that.

This all occurred in about the last 15-20 years.... I know an eternity. But considering mechanical drawings(rulers etc) date back to davinci .... It is quite astonding. Just wait til 3dprinting takes off... Think star Trek replicators... Amazing.
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post #36 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Are you guys seriously arguing over the term "blueprint"?   FFS . . . 

The picture shows "details about the iPhone 5." You can call it a "cheeseburger" and it won't change what you're seeing. 

Hey, for us older tech folks it brings back found memories... Just having some fun.
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post #37 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by boeyc15 View Post


Mixing terms I think. A measured drawing can be a blue print.
There WAS the original drawing(what ever, outline, component, assembly), typically ink on vellum. The 'prints', copies or 'blue prints' were made from the original(usually kept in the vault).
NOW, im would presume Apples is all digital 3d, a data base is the original part. And that is digital revision controlled etc.
Outline drawings, machine data, etc is all copied from that, then prints are inkjet, pdf'd from that.
This all occurred in about the last 15-20 years.... I know an eternity. But considering mechanical drawings(rulers etc) date back to davinci .... It is quite astonding. Just wait til 3dprinting takes off... Think star Trek replicators... Amazing.

 

All I know is that when I was taking classes in this stuff (admittedly a long time ago), the teacher would ask the class "what's a blueprint?"  People would say a lot of different things and then he would say the real answer, which was always that it had nothing to do with the various printing processes.  "A blueprint in a schematic drawing that would allow one to recreate the object in question, or that completely describes the object in question."  Period.  

 

Whatever we drew, and regardless of the draftsmanship, we would lose marks if it wasn't "complete," and by complete he meant including every detail necessary to recreate the object in question. That's what I was taught anyway.  A blueprint is a schematic that completely describes an object, thus it's use in the vernacular as being a sort of source code for the object in question. It's called a blueprint because of the printing process, but that isn't it's actual definition, at least not originally. 

 

These couldn't be "blueprints" therefore unless they also had the inside measurements, as well as the measurements and complete views of every individual piece.  A blueprint needn't have isometric views, but it should have all the information and measurements necessary to recreate or describe the object in question.  This is not that, AFAICS. 

post #38 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by JupiterOne View Post

Chill people. We still cc: in our email, but most people these days don't even know what carbon paper is.

The iPhone phone icon shows a handset design of a phone from many decades ago.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

All I know is that when I was taking classes in this stuff (admittedly a long time ago), the teacher would ask the class "what's a blueprint?"  People would say a lot of different things and then he would say the real answer, which was always that it had nothing to do with the various printing processes.  "A blueprint in a schematic drawing that would allow one to recreate the object in question, or that completely describes the object in question."  Period.  

Whatever we drew, and regardless of the draftsmanship, we would lose marks if it wasn't "complete," and by complete he meant including every detail necessary to recreate the object in question. That's what I was taught anyway.  A blueprint is a schematic that completely describes an object, thus it's use in the vernacular as being a sort of source code for the object in question. It's called a blueprint because of the printing process, but that isn't it's actual definition, at least not originally. 

These couldn't be "blueprints" therefore unless they also had the inside measurements, as well as the measurements and complete views of every individual piece.  A blueprint needn't have isometric views, but it should have all the information and measurements necessary to recreate or describe the object in question.  This is not that, AFAICS. 

I've never heard of the term being defined so specifically, and I had a pretty strict drafting teacher, at least where grades were concerned, he was fun otherwise.

Even in the early-90s, my high school still used the ammonia print replication process for basic drafting, hand drawn using pencil, on vellum, with drafting arms. CAD was reserved for 2nd and 3rd year drafting. I think it's all CAD now, I really haven't been back there.
post #39 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I've never heard of the term being defined so specifically, and I had a pretty strict drafting teacher, at least where grades were concerned, he was fun otherwise.
Even in the early-90s, my high school still used the ammonia print replication process for basic drafting, hand drawn using pencil, on vellum, with drafting arms. CAD was reserved for 2nd and 3rd year drafting. I think it's all CAD now, I really haven't been back there.

In his last paragraph he writes "A blueprint needn't have isometric views, but it should have all the information and measurements necessary to [...] describe the object in question." It does exactly that. It describes every detail needed for case makers.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #40 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

iPhone - 135g
iPhone 3G - 133g (1.5% decrease YoY)
iPhone 3GS- 135g (1.5% increase YoY)
iPhone 4- 137g (1.5% increase YoY)
iPhone 4S- 140g (2.2% increase YoY)
iPhone 5- 112g (20.0% decrease YoY)

You are likely to post facts from reliable sources on the weight of the iPhone, for which I thank you. But does anyone know if a 16GB model is lighter than a 32GB or a 64GB model? Or are the amount of NAND modules, and their weight, the same but just with different capacity? The nerd in me wonders about this stuff...
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